THE MUDDLE FAMILIES

THE LINEAGE & HISTORY OF THE MUDDLE FAMILIES OF THE WORLD

INCLUDING VARIANTS MUDDEL, MUDDELL, MUDLE & MODDLE

 

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SUSSEX MUDDLES

[Ardingly Muddles] [Buxted Muddles]

[Framfield Muddles] [Mayfield Muddles]

[Waldron Muddles]

 

KENT MUDDLES

[Harrietsham Muddles]

 

DORSET MUDDLES

[Portland Muddles] [Wimborne Muddles]

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[Muddle Stories] [Related Families]

 

 

GENERAL NOTES

 

Pre 1752 dates:

With the change from the Julian to the Gregorian Calendar in 1752, New Year’s Day was moved back from the 25 March to the 1 January. In this history all pre 1752 dates between the 1 January and the 24 March, which came at the end of the year in the Julian Calendar, have been moved to be at the beginning of the following year. For example, 19 February 1625 in the Old Style Julian Calendar has been entered as 19 February 1626. This has been done to make the calculating of time periods simple and independent of whether dates are pre or post 1752. Also it was thought to be less confusing than the use of the standard double date notation, where the above example would be written as 19 February 1625/6, for those readers who are not familiar with its use.

 

Spelling of names:

The spelling of surnames within a family has been made consistent, unless it’s known that a deliberate change has been made to the spelling, particularly in more modern times. For more distant times, more than about 200 years ago, where some surnames have gradually changed over time, the most frequently used spelling at any time has been used, with a change being introduced at a particular generation to give consistency.

 

 

For Christian names in recent times, about the last 100 years, the spelling of the name as recorded or given by an informant has been used, even if this is not the normal spelling of the name, as frequently ‘odd’ spellings seem to have been used to make a name seem less common, unless there is other information to the contrary. For more distant times, where odd spellings, such as An for Ann occur, the modern version has been used. Where there are two, or more, accepted versions of a name, such as Ann & Anne, and Harriet & Harriett, the most frequently used version in the records for that person has been used.

In old records, where what would now be considered distinctly separate names were used for the same person, such as Agnes, Annis and Ann in the early 1600s, this has been noted in the section on that person, and where possible the most frequently used version taken as the person’s name.

For those persons whose names were recorded in Latin, the English version of a name has been used.

These are the general rules that have been used on names, but where it was considered that a slightly different treatment would give a more accurate rendering of a given situation; these rules have been ‘bent’.

For direct quotes from records the exact form of a name as it occurs in the record has been retained.

 

Abbreviations used for record repositories in footnotes:

ANZ

Archives New Zealand, Auckland & regional offices.

BL

British Library India Office Records, London.

BPMA

The British Postal Museum & Archive, London.

CCA

Canterbury Cathedral Archives, Canterbury, Kent.

CKS

Kent History & Library Centre, Maidstone, Kent.

CRO

Cornwall Record Office, Truro, Cornwall.

DHC

Dorset History Centre, Dorchester, Dorset.

DRO

Devon Record Office, Exeter, Devon.

ESRO

East Sussex Record Office, Lewes, East Sussex.

FHL

Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.

GL

Guildhall Library, London.

HRO

Herefordshire Record Office, Hereford, Herefordshire.

LAR

Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.

LRO

Lichfield Record Office, Lichfield, Staffordshire.

LMA

London Metropolitan Archives, London.

MA

Medway Archives, Strood, Kent.

NAA

National Archives of Australia, Canberra.

NARA

National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.

NMM

National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London.

NSWSA

New South Wales State Archives, Sydney, New South Wales.

TNA

The National Archives, Kew, London.

WSRO

West Sussex Record Office, Chichester, West Sussex.

 

Abbreviations used for publications:

SAC

Sussex Archaeological Collections.

SRS

Sussex Record Society.

 

Acknowledgements:

Lynda Mudle-Small generously supplied a large proportion of the facts and all the illustrations for the ‘Wimborne Muddles’ from her long term and extensive research into the history of her family. A number of the illustrations had been supplied to Lynda by her relative Margaret Lee.

Margaret Worrall supplied information and most of the illustrations for the Gillingham branch of the ‘Loose Muddles’ from her own research and family archives. The illustrations are a selection of excellent early family photographs that include the earliest know photograph of a Muddle family member.

Mary Dalton, Charlie Hicks, Sue Lake, Glenyss Muddle, Priscilla Pearce, Ian Robinson and Jill Zinzan all supplied information and many of the photographs for the ‘Portland Muddles’.

Irene Blackburn, Dearg Brown, Betty Cole, Richard Cordle, Ken Creed, Tim Draper, Patricia Henderson, Paul Macarthy, Graham Mitchell, Harry & Penny Muddle, Nigel & Susannah Muddle, Helen Harkness Ryan and Tony Woodward all supplied information and family photographs for the ‘Ardingly Muddles’.

Claire Freind, John & Jennifer Gearing, Dawn Geddes, Theresa Geer, Joy Head, Jean & Tony Hedger, Greg Jaques, Brian Jones, Nick Litton, Paula McConnell, Bill Matthews, Harold Moddle, Rodney Muddle, Debbie Smith, Mary Wells and Cate Young all supplied information and family photographs for the ‘Buxted Muddles’.

Jill Kell supplied information for the Biddenden Branch of the ‘Mayfield Muddles’ from her research into her family.

Beth Johnson supplied an extensive amount of information on the Medell branch of the ‘Framfield Muddles’ in the USA.

Many other members of the Muddle families have also been most helpful in supplying information and photographs.

 

Copyright © Derek Miller 2005-2013

Last updated 17 August 2013

 

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