THE MUDDLE FAMILIES

THE LINEAGE & HISTORY OF THE MUDDLE FAMILIES OF THE WORLD

INCLUDING VARIANTS MUDDEL, MUDDELL, MUDLE & MODDLE

 

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THE DORSET MUDDLE FAMILIES

THE PORTLAND MUDDLES

 

Introduction

William & Grace Muddleís Family

William & Harriet Muddleís Family

William & Eliza Muddleís Family

Robert & Mary Ann Muddleís Family

Interview of Clara Margaret Papps

Index of Family Members

Charts

 

 

William & Grace Muddleís Family

 

Chart of William & Grace Muddleís Family

 

William Muddle married Grace Pearce, though no marriage has been found, in about 1692. Grace is assumed to have been a widow as her will names two of her children, Alexander and Alice Pearce, whom she must have had before she married William Muddle. The will of Williamís uncle William Muddle of Winfrith Newburgh in Dorset, dated 31 December 1693, describes William as being a husbandman of the Isle of Portland and to have brothers John and Robert. This will left all Williamís lands and tenements in Winfrith Newburgh and elsewhere to his wife Anne for her life (she died in 1708) and then to his nephew William of Portland and on to his sons.[1] It was probably in about 1693 that William and Grace had their first child, John, whose baptism has not been found, but who is named in Graceís will. Their second child, William, was born at Portland in early 1696.

It was at about the time that his second son was born that William enlisted in the Royal Navy, enrolling as an able seaman on HMS Burford on 4 February 1696. As the Burford was at this time berthed at Chatham in Kent it seems likely that William had been enlisted by a recruiting party from the Burford. The Royal Navy would have been actively seeking recruits at this time as it was engaged in the final stages of the War of the Grand Alliance (1688 to 1697) in which England and a number of European allies were at war with France; for England this war was to ensure that there was no French-backed restoration of James II. William was probably at home for the baptism of his son on 9 February as he didnít join his ship until 23 April when it was anchored at The Downs, a naval anchorage off the Kent coast between Dover and Deal. This difference in time between enlisting and joining the ship seems to have been similar for many of the other members of the crew. The Burford then sailed round into the English Channel and during early May was in the area of Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight, before sailing to join the 7th Fleet at the island of Ushant in the mouth of the English Channel off the French coast on 14 May. The next day the Fleet went looking for enemy ships near the French port of Brest and gave chase to those they found.[2] The Burford was then at anchor in Tor Bay off the Devon coast from 24 May to 21 June before returning to Ushant on 30 June 1696, this being the same day that William made his will while serving on the Burford under the command of Captain Richard FitzPatrick. During late July and most of August the Burford was again anchored at Tor Bay until sailing to Spithead off Portsmouth where she was at anchor from 31 August. William had only served on the Burford for a few months when he was discharged on the 28 September 1696 while she was still at anchor at Spithead, so that he could join HMS Sunderland. The Masterís Log of the Burford for 28 September recorded that there had been a hard gale and dirty weather for 24 hours when sixty-eight men were transferred to the Sunderland.[3]

Williamís pay for his service on the Burford was £1 16s 1d, this was made up of the following deductions: £1 3s 4d for tobacco (William would have purchased tobacco on credit from the purser during the voyage); 8s 6d for the Chest (this was the Chatham Chest, which was a fund set up in 1588 after the Spanish Armada to pay compensation to injured, and pensions to permanently disabled, Royal Navy seaman; the money for the fund came from deductions of, originally 6d, and in Williamís time 1s per month, from the pay of Royal Navy seaman, and was kept in a large wooden chest at Chatham); 4s 3d for Greenwich Hospital (this was a deduction, which started the year William joined the navy, of 6d per month from Royal Navy seamenís pay to help pay for Greenwich Hospital that cared for sick and old seamen): Thus leaving William without any net wages.[4]

 

 

William joined the crew of the Sunderland at Spithead as an ordinary seaman on 29 September 1696, being one of the sixty-eight men transferred from the Burford. On 4 October the Sunderland set sail from Spithead, and for the next month she was recorded as sailing between the Lizard Peninsular in Cornwall and Faial in the Azores, which seems to mean that she must have been on patrol looking for enemy ships, particularly French privateers who were then active against commercial ships of the Grand Alliance. Then from 7 November she was recorded as sailing between the Lizard Peninsular and Madeira, meaning that she was now patrolling closer to the coasts of France, Spain and Portugal. On the 18 November the Sunderland was hit by a ferocious gale that took away much of her sail and topmasts, and three days later she set sail for England for repairs. On the 29 November she arrived at Spithead, and from 24 December 1696 to 20 February 1697 she was in Portsmouth Harbour, during part of this time she was in the docks being repaired. The Sunderland was then at anchor at Spithead until she set sail for Barbados on 6 March 1697. After sailing for nearly six weeks they arrived at Barbados on 16 April. From 1 May they were sailing between Barbados and Antigua and then onto Port Royal in Jamaica, where they arrived on 16 May. From the 23 May the Sunderland was recorded as sailing between Jamaica and Carthegine, which must be in the Caribbean but has not been identified.[5]

On 27 May 1697 William, having served on the Sunderland for eight months, was discharged at Barbados so that he could join HMS Bideford. Williamís pay while serving on the Sunderland was made up of deductions of 11s 8d for tobacco, 8s 6d for the Chest, 4s 3d for Greenwich Hospital, and 13s 6d for slop cloaths (cheap ready-made clothes purchased on credit from the purser during the voyage), leaving him again without any net wages.[6]

 

 

William joined the crew of the Bideford at Barbados on 28 May 1697. At this time the Bideford was stationed in Carlisle Bay, Barbados and spending about two weeks each month out cruising. On the 7 July the Bideford transferred several sick men to shore, and itís thought that William may well have been one of these, because he is recorded as becoming a runner (jumping ship) on 10 July 1697, after having served only about six weeks on the Bideford.[7] Around this time several crewmen are recorded as either dying or becoming runners; for several including William the place that this happened was not recorded, but for others it was recorded as being in Barbados. Williamís pay for the short time he was on the Bideford consisted of deductions of 1s 6d for the Chest and 9d for Greenwich Hospital, and as would be expected this time, again no net wages.[8] So all of William's time in the Royal Navy was during the last two years of the War of the Grand Alliance which ended with the Treaty of Ryswick on 20 September 1697.

What happened to William after he jumped ship is unknown, but his will was proved in London by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury on 9 January 1704, this will made his wife Grace his sole executrix and left her his whole estate including any property and pay, bounty or prize money that may be due to him.[9] No burial has been found for William at Portland so itís assumed that he probably never made it back to his family in England. Did he die in Barbados and Grace somehow get know of it and thus be able to have his will proved, or as seems more likely did something like the current seven year rule apply then, whereby a missing person could be declared dead for probate purposes if unheard of for a set amount of time, it was nearly seven years between William going missing and his will being proved. Did William possibly settle in Barbados, probably under a new name, or get involved in something more exotic such as joining one of the pirate ships that then operated in the Caribbean?

Twenty-five years after having William's will proved Grace died and was buried in Portland Churchyard on 25 December 1729. Graceís will dated 11 December 1729 and proved by Dorset Archdeaconry Court on 25 July 1730 made her daughter Alice her sole executrix and made the following bequests. To her son Alexander Pearce £10 of money and one Yard of Arable Land in Drape Field in a furlong there called Rattle Wall and one Yard more of Arable Land in West Field in a furlong called Trade. To her son John Muddle £10 of money and one featherbed and bolster and all the other bedclothes there unto belonging, together with one Yard of Arable Land in East Field in a furlong there commonly called and known by the name of Kingbary and all her Right or Share in Church Point. To her son William Muddle £10 of money and one featherbed and bolster and all the other bedclothes there unto belonging, together with Three Yards of Arable Land lying in Portland aforesaid in a Furlong there called Inmorshay. To her daughter Alice wife of Robert Pearce her Meadow Close of ground called Gorsslands.[10]

 

Their children were:

John 1693-1734  William 1696-1769

 

 

 

Graceís eldest child from her first marriage was Alexander Pearce. Alexander married Elizabeth Flew at Portland Church on 20 October 1709. They had one child born at Portland in 1712. When his mother died in 1729 Alexander inherited £10 of money and one Yard of Arable Land in Drape Field in a furlong there called Rattle Wall and one Yard more of Arable Land in West Field in a furlong called Trade.

 

 

Alexander and Elizabethís only child was Robert Pearce who was baptised at Portland Church on 6 October 1712.

 

 

Graceís second child from her first marriage was Alice Pearce. Alice married Robert Pearce at Portland Church on 2 Jan 1712. They had three children born at Portland between 1712 and 1721, the first of whom died in infancy. When her mother died in 1729 Alice was her sole executrix and inherited her Meadow Close of ground called Gorsslands.

 

 

Robert and Aliceís eldest child was Abel Pearce who was baptised at Portland Church on 8 November 1712. Abel died when only about 10 months old, and was buried in Portland Churchyard on 13 September 1713.

 

Robert and Aliceís second child was Abel Pearce who was baptised at Portland Church on 22 November 1717. Abel died on 25 July 1737 at the age of 19, and he was buried in St Andrewís Churchyard at Portland on 27 July 1737.

 

Robert and Aliceís third child was Grace Pearce who was baptised at Portland Church on 6 January 1721.

 

 

William and Graceís eldest child (Graceís third) was John Muddle who was born in about 1693. When he was about 25 years old John married Grace Hendy at Portland Church on 7 February 1719. They had six children born at Portland between 1719 and 1732, four of whom died in childhood. When his mother died in 1729 John inherited £10 of money and one featherbed and bolster and all the other bedclothes there unto belonging, together with one Yard of Arable Land in East Field in a furlong there commonly called and known by the name of Kingbary, and all her Right or Share in Church Point.

John died when he was about 40 years old, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 10 December 1734. John had made his will on 8 December 1734, two days before his burial, and in this will John made his wife Grace his sole executrix and left her all his real estate consisting of a house and farmland on the Isle of Portland held as copyhold of the Manor of Portland, and also all his personal estate. This will was proved by Dorset Archdeaconry Court on 5 November 1735 and an inventory of John's personal estate (moveable assets, not including any real estate), produced by Robert Pearce, William Muddle and Augustine Elliott, and dated 7 January 1735, was submitted to Dorset Archdeaconry Court. This inventory lists a range of household items such as beds, tables, chairs, trunks, pots, dishes, etc. and his clothes to a total value of £16 3s.[11]

An Inventory of All Such Goods of John Muddle of the Isle of Portland in the County of Dorset Late Deceased Taken Valued and Appraised this Seventh Day of January In the Year of our Lord one thousand Seven Hundred Thirty and four By whose Names are here Under Subscribed.

First two old fedder beds, three bolsters, three small pillows

& three old rugs, two pair of sheets, two pair blankets.                      £    s    d

Valued and Appraised at                                                                     3 : 10 : 0

And also one feal bedstead, one table board, one settle,

ten old chairs, six old tubs. Appraised at                                            1 : 02 : 0

And also for nine old barrels, three old flackets [two handle

basket or oval wash tub], two old pails, two old trunks,

and one old box. Appraised at                                                            1 : 00 : 6

And also for one old brass furnace, two small brass kettles, one

brass pot, two brass candlesticks, two pewter dishes. Appraised at  1 : 10 : 0

And also for twelve earthen dishes, four earthen quarts,

four earthen pints, two Rongges. Appraised at                                  0 : 05 : 0

And also for one small cock of wheat. Appraised at                          1 : 00 : 0

And also for his warn apparel. Valued and Appraised at                  7 : 10 : 0

And also for some other small implements of household,

that is to say one pair of bellows, one pair of tongs,

one frying pan & some other small things. In all Appraised at         0 : 05 : 6

                                                                                                       £16 : 03 : 0

Witnesses unto the above Appraised Monts this Seventh Day of January 1734

Robert Pearce

William Muddle

Augustine Elliott

Thirty-five years later Grace died and was buried in Portland Churchyard on 16 June 1770. Graceís will dated 8 November 1761 and proved by Dorset Archdeaconry Court on 3 March 1772 made her two sons Robert and William her executors. To her son Robert she left her dwelling house in the village of Fortuneswell on Portland; her one half acre and half a yard being in Portland aforesaid in a place called Wottledown; an equal share with his brother William of her part of a pasture close called Gerslands and her one half part of one over yard of arable land in Trade and also all her property of a way called Church Point; her table, chest and copper furnace; her utensils and implements of brewing as long as he continues to sell beer and ale, then to share them equally with his brother William. To her son William she left twenty guineas; her house and a garden plot in the village of Chesil on Portland; her garden plot lying to the north of John Allen's house in the village of Chesil; one Yard of arable land being in the East Field upon Kingbarry and also one over yard more of arable being in the Droop Field otherwise Leniesmill Field in a furlong there called Above Four Acres; an equal share with his brother Robert of her part of a pasture close called Gerslands and her one half part of one over yard of arable land in Trade and also all her property of a way called Church Point.[12]

 

Their children were:

Robert 1719-1773  William 1721-1804  John 1723-1724  John 1724-1737

Grace 1727-1730  Grace 1732-1737

 

 

 

John and Graceís eldest child was Robert Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 10 May 1719 . When he was about 31 years old Robert married Margaret in about 1750. They had seven children born at Portland between 1751 and 1762, three of whom died in childhood. In the Militia Ballot List of 1758 Robert was listed as a quarryman of Chesil on Portland.

When his mother died in 1770 Robert was to be joint executor with his brother William of her will, but only Robert was sworn to administer. Robert inherited according to the will: her dwelling house in the village of Fortuneswell on Portland; her one half acre and half a yard being in Portland aforesaid in a place called Wottledown; an equal share with his brother William of her part of a pasture close called Gerslands and her one half part of one over yard of arable land in Trade and also all her property of a way called Church Point; her table, chest and copper furnace; her utensils and implements of brewing as long as he continues to sell beer and ale, then to share them equally with his brother William.

Three years later Robert died at the age of 54, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 24 September 1773. Robertís will made on the 20 September 1773 and proved on 14 May 1774 by Dorset Archdeaconry Court described him as a yeoman of Portland; it made his wife Margaret his sole executrix and bequeathed his whole estate, including his dwelling house at Fortuneswell, quarry grounds, right in Church Point Gate and arable grounds, to Margaret.[13]

Twelve years after Robertís death Margaret died and was buried in Portland Churchyard on 7 February 1786. Margaretís will dated 1 February 1785 and proved by Dorset Archdeaconry Court on 21 March 1786 made her three surviving daughters (her sons had all died) joint executrixes of her will and made the following bequests to them:[14]

I Give unto my Three only Daughters Susanna the wife of Thomas Lano Elizabeth Muddle and Rebecca the now wife of John Muddle my Cloase of Meadow Land in the South Field containing by estimation four acres commonly called New Crafts to be equal divided between them share and share alike and freely to them to use or to sell to them and their heirs forever according to the Custom of the Island and Manor of Portland with the Appurtenances thereunto belonging - Item I do Give unto my Daughters Elizabeth Muddle and Rebecca Muddle the wife of John Muddle my Messuage Dwelling house Land or Tenement Stable Backhouse and Backsides with a Small Meadow Cloase all adjoining together in the village of Fortuneswell within the Island and Manor of Portland and to be equal divided between them share and share alike and freely to them to give or to sell to them and their heirs forever according to the Custom of the Island and Manor of Portland with the Appurtenances thereunto belonging Ė Item I do Give unto my Daughter Elizabeth Muddle my Pasture Cloase near Gerslings called New Cloase and the following Arable Land viz the one half of my acre in the South Field in a furlong called Bronscombe on the North Side thereof and one over yard or yard and half in the West Field in a furlong called Reap Lane and one yard in the Droop Field in a furlong called Ducks Stile and one yard more in the same field in a furlong called Abovecombe and my middle yard in Kingbarrow in the East Field and the one half of my acre in the Combe Field on the South Side in a furlong called Jobb Craft and also one yard more in the Court Field in a furlong called Trade Ė I do give unto my Daughter Susanna now the wife of Thomas Lano my Messuage Dwelling house Land or Tenement Backside Stable and Garden all adjoining to each other in the village of Southwell and my Meadow Cloase also near the village of Southwell called Dobins Door and also to my Daughter Susanna the following Arable Land viz the one half of my acre in the South Field called Bronscombe on the south part thereof my half acre and half yard in the West Field in a furlong called Row Barrow and my over yard or yard and half in the East Field in a furlong Broad Craft and my yard in the same East Field in a furlong called Kingbarrow by Mr Propers Wall and the one half of my acre in the Combe Field at Jobbs Craft at the north side and freely to her to give or to sell to she and her heirs forever according to the Custom of the Island and Manor of Portland with the Appurtenances thereunto belonging Ė Item I do Give unto my Daughter Rebecca the now wife of John Muddle my meadow cloase near the village of Southwell called Sheat and also to my Daughter Rebecca the following Arable Lands viz my over yard or yard and half in the South Field in a furlong called Twing Crafts and my half acre and half yard near the village of Southwell in a Incleafed Ground called Waddle Down and my half acre in the West Field in a furlong called Rersburrow and my yard in the East Field in the west part of a furlong called Kingbarrow and my yard in the Combe Field in a furlong called Under Lane and my over yard or a yard and half in a field called Torst and all to my Daughter Rebecca freely to her to give or to sell to she and her heirs forever according to the Custom of the Island and Manor of Portland and the Appurtenances thereunto belonging.

I also give to my Three Daughters Susanna the wife of Thomas Lano Elizabeth Muddle and my Daughter Rebecca wife of John Muddle my part or Right of a Quarry Cloase called Gerslings my Right of one half penny Rent in the Right wareunder Gerslings my Right in Church Point and my Right or way in the Court Field To haul stone in a furlong called Isade under a Wall This to my Three Daughters I give them share and share alike and to be divided between them and each alike of the Rights and the Appurtenances thereof and freely to them to give or to sell to them and their heirs forever according to the Custom of the Island and Manor of Portland.

 

Their children were:

Robert 1751-1754  Susannah 1753-1814  Robert 1755-1760

William 1756-1780  Jane 1757-1758  Elizabeth 1760-1823

Rebecca 1762-1803

 

 

Robert and Margaretís eldest child was Robert Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 27 October 1751. Robert died when only 2 years old, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 24 March 1754.

 

Robert and Margaretís second child was Susannah Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 12 February 1753. When she was 18 years old Susannah married Thomas Lano at Portland Church on 2 November 1771. They had at least six children born at Portland between 1772 and 1787. After September 1787 there were two couples at Portland called Thomas and Susannah Lano so it has been impossible to determine which of the next eleven baptisms of children to parents of this name belong to this Thomas and Susannah, but some almost certainly do. When her mother died in 1786 Susannah was joint executrix with her sisters Elizabeth and Rebecca of her will and inherited several properties on Portland as shown in the detail of the will given in the above section on her parents. Susannah was living at Wakeham when she died at the age of 61 (not 63 as given on her burial record), and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 12 January 1814.

 

 

Thomas and Susannahís eldest child was Susanna Lano who was baptised at Portland Church on 1 March 1772.

 

Thomas and Susannahís second child was Jenny Lano who was baptised at Portland Church on 6 February 1774.

 

Thomas and Susannahís third child was Robert Lano who was baptised at Portland Church on 13 October 1776.

 

Thomas and Susannahís fourth child was Thomas Lano who was baptised at Portland Church on 14 November 1779. Thomas died at the age of 16 and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 19 February 1796.

 

Thomas and Susannahís fifth child was Elizabeth Lano who was baptised at Portland Church on 10 November 1783.

 

Thomas and Susannahís sixth child was Ruth Lano who was baptised at Portland Church on 1 April 1787.

 

 

Robert and Margaretís third child was Robert Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 26 January 1755. Robert died when only 5 years old, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 24 January 1760.

 

Robert and Margaretís fourth child was William Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 16 May 1756. William died at the age of 24, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 21 November 1780.

 

Robert and Margaretís fifth child was Jane Muddle, known as Jenny, who was baptised at Portland Church on 24 August 1757. Jane died when only about 9months old, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 17 May 1758.

 

Robert and Margaretís sixth child was Elizabeth Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 9 November 1760. In 1784 when she was 23 years old Elizabeth had an illegitimate daughter. When her mother died in 1786 Elizabeth was joint executrix with her sisters Susannah and Rebecca of her will and inherited several properties on Portland as shown in the detail of the will given in the above section on her parents. Later that year Elizabeth, at the age 26, married 25-year-old Richard Flann at Portland Church on 28 October 1786. Richard was the son of John and Grace Flann, and he had been baptised at Portland Church on 14 June 1761. Richard and Elizabeth had five children born at Portland between 1787 and 1802, the first of whom died when only 2 years old. Richard was a quarryman and a month after the baptism of his fifth child he died, at the age of about 42, when he was shot dead by a navy press gang on the 2 April 1803. He was buried in Portland Churchyard on 6 April 1803. The following is a description of the events that lead to Richardís death:

The Easton Massacre, April 1803

In the 18th and 19th centuries, the lower ranks of the British armed forces were not seen as a good 'career move' for the average working man. The army recruited by offering 'the King's shilling' to anyone who signed up to 'follow the drum'. The navy had a far more direct method, they pressed men into service. In our more enlightened age, we would see their methods as little more than kidnapping, but at the time it could be sanctioned by a Magistrate's warrant.

Portland, being a Royal Manor, had a special arrangement by which the tenants would pay to the Lord of the Manor a 'Quit Rent', as a result of which they were relieved of any obligation to perform military service. This did not, however, prevent the tragic events which occurred in April 1803.

On Friday, 1st April 1803, the frigate Eagle, commander George Wolfe, anchored in Portland Roads. He immediately sent a boat ashore and Nicholas Way, son of John Way, was impressed. However, he was found to be exempt because he was the captain of a small vessel and was released again a couple of days later.

The following morning, at about 5 o'clock, a much larger party including 24 marines armed with muskets, bayonets and cutlasses were put ashore. They quickly impressed Henry Wiggatt and Nicholas Way the son of Elizabeth Way, taking them to be held at Portland Castle while they continued their work.

The alarm having now been raised, the inhabitants of Chesil escaped up the hill pursued by the press gang. On reaching the top of Reforne, they were met by the Constable of the Portland Court Leet, Mr Zachariah White. He stopped them and demanded what authority they had to impress the inhabitants of Portland. The press gang produced their warrant, but it was signed by the Mayor of Weymouth and not by a County >Magistrate, and was therefore invalid. This did not stop the press gang.

They reached Easton Square at about 6 o'clock where they were met by the massed ranks of the Portlanders determined to stop them by any means necessary. When the press gang seized Robert Bennett, the mob surged forward to rescue him. In the confusion that followed, the captain fired his pistol and the marines took this as their order to fire. Three Portlanders were shot dead, Alexander Andrews, Richard Flann and William Lano. A further two were wounded, Richard Bennett and Mary Way. Mary died of her wound on the 21st May.

The press gang returned to their ship with no further pressed men, other than the 2 they had taken first thing that morning. In St George's church there is a plaque commemorating this event. It reads:

To the memory of the following islanders

who were shot by the Press Gang

during its unlawful raid on the Royal Manor of Portland

in what was known as the Easton Massacre

on April 2nd 1803

ALEXANDER ANDREWS Quarryman

RICHARD FLANN Quarryman

WILLIAM LANO Blacksmith

and MARY WAY who died later of

wounds received in the same raid

This plaque was unveiled by

Rear Admiral G I PRITCHARD on April 23rd 1978

Twenty years later Elizabeth died in the Poorhouse at the age of 63 (not 62 as given on her burial record), and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 16 December 1823.

 

 

 

Elizabethís illegitimate daughter was Elizabeth Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 18 July 1784.

 

Richard and Elizabethís eldest child (Elizabethís second) was Thomas Flann who was baptised at Portland Church on 11 March 1787. Thomas died when only 2 years old, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 25 November 1789.

 

Richard and Elizabethís second child (Elizabethís third) was John Flann who was baptised at Portland Church on 21 December 1788.

 

Richard and Elizabethís third child (Elizabethís fourth) was Richard Flann who was baptised at Portland Church on 2 April 1795.

 

Richard and Elizabethís fourth child (Elizabethís fifth) was Elizabeth Flann who was baptised at Portland Church on 24 December 1797.

 

Richard and Elizabethís fifth child (Elizabethís sixth) was Grace Flann who was baptised at Portland Church on 7 March 1802.

 

 

Robert and Margaretís seventh child was Rebecca Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 15 January 1762. When she was 22 years old Rebecca married her 22-year-old second cousin John Muddle at Portland Church on 21 August 1784. See the section below on John Muddle for the rest of their lives and details of their family.

 

 

John and Graceís second child was William Muddle who was born at Portland in about 1721. No baptism has been found for William but he is named in his mother's will; itís possible that he comes elsewhere in the sequence of John and Graceís children, 1721 just being a best guess at his date of birth. William Muddle was described as a quarryman of the Island of Portland in a deed for the lease of a garden dated 15 April 1741 that is listed in A Calendar of the Dorset Deeds presented to the Field Club in 1909 by Mr E A Fry.

When he was about 22 years old William married 21-year-old Ann Schollar at Wyke Regis Church on 30 October 1743. Ann was the daughter of Richard and Deborah Schollar, and she had been baptised at Portland Church on 4 June 1722. William and Ann had eight children born at Portland between 1744 and 1763. In the Militia Ballot List of 1758 William was listed as a quarryman of Chesil on Portland.

When his mother died in 1770 William was to be joint executor with his brother Robert of her will, but only Robert was sworn to administer. William inherited according to the will: twenty guineas; her house and a garden plot in the village of Chesil on Portland; her garden plot lying to the north of John Allen's house in the village of Chesil; one Yard of arable land being in the East Field upon Kingbarry and also one over yard more of arable being in the Droop Field otherwise Leniesmill Field in a furlong there called Above Four Acres; an equal share with his brother Robert of her part of a pasture close called Gerslands and her one half part of one over yard of arable land in Trade and also all her property of a way called Church Point.

Ann died at the age of 74, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 12 June 1796. Eight years later William died at the age of about 83, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 30 October 1804. William's will dated 6 October 1802 and proved by Bristol Consistory Court on 22 November 1804 described William as a quarryman of Portland, and at probate his effects were valued at under £10. This will made his son William and his daughters Grace, Ann and Elizabeth his executors, and made the following bequests:[15]

First. I give unto my daughter Grace now wife of William Chick my dwelling house and backside and all thereunto adjoining freely to her to give or to sell according to the custom of the Isle and Manor of Portland.

Item. I give unto my Granddaughter Margery Chick daughter of my daughter Grace my best bed bolster and pillows that I now lays on and my sitting place in the third seat of the North Gallery of Portland Church freely to her as aforesaid.

Item. I give unto my Son Richard Muddle now lunatic the Interest of two Hundred pounds (that I have now on Mortlage [Mortgage] on the House and Lands of Thos Ayles) for and during his natural life and I do appoint my daughter Grace Chick and Thomas Read Soonest to Receive the same and to Convert it to the use of my son Richd Muddle as they shall think best.

Item. I give One Hundred pounds of the Money above Mentioned to my son Wm Muddle or his heirs if any after the death of My aforesaid Son Richard Muddle (if he should survive him) if not to go to my daughters with the other.

Item. I give one Hundred pounds of the Money above Mentioned to my three daughters that is to say My daughter Grace now wife of Wm Chick my daughter Ann now wife of Matthew Gardner and my daughter Elizabeth now wife of Isaac Dammer if share and share alike if they should survive my son Richard Muddle if not to return to their heirs.

Item. I give one fifth part of my right in Gosslands to my son-in-law Thos Read freely to him as aforesaid.

And all the rest of my effects that I die possest [possessed] of I give unto my four children or their heirs that is to say my Son Wm my Daughter Grace my Daughter Ann and my daughter Elizabeth share and share alike freely to them aforesaid.

 

Their children were:

Grace 1744-1825  Elizabeth 1746-1818  Ann 1749-1822

John 1751-1769  Jane 1754-1800  Richard 1757-1825

William 1758-1831  Rebecca 1763-1764

 

 

 

William and Annís eldest child was Grace Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 19 October 1744. When she was 19 years old Grace married William Chick in a tabernacle (meaning a temporary building) of Portland Church on 6 February 1764. They had nine children born at Portland between 1764 and 1789, two of whom died in childhood during May 1776. When her father died in 1804 Grace was one of his executors and inherited his dwelling house and a quarter share in the residue of his estate. She was also to inherit from her father a third share of £100 after the death of her brother Richard, but as Richard died after Grace this went to her heirs. Grace was a widow living at Wakeham when she died at the age of 81 and was buried in Portland Churchyard on 26 November 1825.

 

 

William and Graceís eldest child was Jane Chick who was baptised at Portland Church on 15 July 1764.

 

William and Graceís second child was Fin Chick who was baptised at Portland Church on 27 Apr 1766 .

 

William and Graceís third child was Grace Chick who was baptised at Portland Church on 3 October 1768.

 

William and Graceís fourth child was Ann Chick who was baptised at Portland Church on 3 March 1771. Ann died when she was only 5 years old, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 19 May 1776 just two weeks after her younger sister Mary.

 

William and Graceís fifth child was Mary Chick who was baptised at Portland Church on 30 January 1774. Mary died when she was only 2 years old, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 5 May 1776 just two weeks before her elder sister Ann.

 

William and Graceís sixth child was Margery Chick who was baptised at Portland Church on 6 April 1777. When her grandfather William Muddle died in 1804 Margery inherited his best bed bolster and pillows, and his sitting place in the third seat of the north gallery of Portland Church.

 

William and Graceís seventh child was Rebecca Chick who was baptised at Portland Church on 31 October 1779.

 

William and Graceís eighth child was Elizabeth Chick who was baptised at Portland Church on 29 August 1784.

 

William and Graceís ninth child was Ann Chick who was baptised at Portland Church on 26 July 1789.

 

 

William and Annís second child was Elizabeth Muddle who was born at Portland in about 1746. There are relatively few baptisms recorded at Portland in 1746 with what seem like gaps in the record, so this may account for there being no record of Elizabethís baptism, but she is named in her fatherís will. When she was about 25 years old Elizabeth married Thomas Flann at Portland Church on 10 November 1771. They had three children born at Portland between 1772 and 1775. Thomas died the year after the birth of their last child, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 21 February 1776. Seventeen years later Elizabeth, now about 47 years old, married Isaac Dammer at Portland Church on 6 April 1793. When her father died in 1804 Elizabeth was one of his executors and inherited a quarter share in the residue of his estate. She was also to inherit from her father a third share of £100 after the death of her brother Richard, but as Richard died after Elizabeth this went to her heirs. They were living at Chesil when Elizabeth died, at the age of 72, and was buried in Portland Churchyard on 19 September 1818. Twelve years later Isaac was living at Chesil when he died, at the age of 75, and was buried in Portland Churchyard on 27 August 1830.

 

 

 

Thomas and Elizabethís eldest child was John Flann who was baptised at Portland Church on 12 January 1772.

 

Thomas and Elizabethís second child was Mary Flann who was baptised at Portland Church on 8 August 1773.

 

Thomas and Elizabethís third child was Elizabeth Flann who was baptised at Portland Church on 9 April 1775.

 

 

William and Annís third child was Ann Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 29 January 1749. When she was 37 years old Ann married Matthew Gardener at Portland Church on 13 December 1786. They didnít have any children. When her father died in 1804 Ann was one of his executors and inherited a quarter share in the residue of his estate. She was also to inherit from her father a third share of £100 after the death of her brother Richard, but as Richard died after Ann this went to her heirs. Twenty years after their marriage Matthew died, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 25 November 1806. Sixteen years later Ann died in the Poorhouse at the age of 73, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 12 June 1822.

 

William and Annís fourth child was John Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 4 August 1751. John died at the age of 18, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 16 November 1769.

 

William and Annís fifth child was Jane Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 12 March 1754. When she was 23 years old Jane married 20-year-old Thomas Read at Portland Church on 17 January 1778. Thomas was the son of Thomas and Ann Read, and he had been baptised at Portland Church on 8 April 1757. Thomas was also the brother of Rebecca Read who married Janeís cousin William Muddle. Thomas and Jane didnít have any children. Jane died at the age of 46, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 10 October 1800. When his father-in-law William Muddle died in 1804 Thomas inherited a fifth part of Williamís right in Grosslands. Twenty-four years later Thomas was living at Weston when he died at the age of 67 (not 66 as given on his burial record), and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 31 July 1824.

 

William and Annís sixth child was Richard Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 2 January 1757. When he was 24 years old Richard married 22-year-old Margery Schollar at Portland Church on 11 October 1781. Margery was the daughter of Richard and Margery Schollar, and she had been baptised at Portland Church on 29 April 1759. They didnít have any children. Margery died at the age of 41, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 16 September 1800. When Richardís father made his will in 1802 he described Richard as then being a lunatic. Then when Richardís father died in 1804 his will left Richard the interest on £200 that had been given as a mortgage on the house and lands of Thomas Ayles, this interest was to be looked after for Richard by his sister Grace Chick and his brother-in-law Thomas Read. Twenty-one years later Richard was living at Chesil when he died, at the age of 69, and was buried in Portland Churchyard on 9 December 1825.

 

William and Annís seventh child was William Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 22 October 1758. When his father died in 1804 William was one of his executors and inherited a quarter share in the residue of his estate. He also inherited £100 from his father after the death of his brother Richard in 1825. William never married. The Dorset Poll Book of 1831 records him as a voter holding freehold land or houses at Portland that he occupied by himself, and that his vote for Ponsonby was rejected and not duly assessed. William was living a Chesil when he died at the age of 73, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 27 December 1831.

 

William and Annís eighth child was Rebecca Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 6 March 1763. Rebecca died when she was about 10 months old, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 30 January 1764.

 

 

John and Graceís third child was John Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 19 November 1723. Itís thought that John died soon after birth as his parents had another son called John just over a year later, and there is a gap in the Portland registers from late 1723 to early 1724 when this probably occurred.

 

John and Graceís fourth child was John Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 12 December 1724. John died when he was 12 years old, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 28 March 1737.

 

John and Graceís fifth child was Grace Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 26 November 1727. Grace died when she was only 2 years old, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 11 January 1730.

 

John and Graceís sixth child was Grace Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 3 November 1732. Grace died when she was about 5 years old, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 25 September 1737.

 

 

William and Graceís second child (Graceís fourth) was William Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 9 February 1696. When he was 25 years old William married Rebecca Schollard at Portland Church on 25 December 1721. They had one child, a son, born at Portland in 1724. When his mother died in 1729 William inherited £10 of money and one featherbed and bolster and all the other bedclothes there unto belonging, together with Three Yards of Arable Land lying in Portland aforesaid in a Furlong there called Inmorshay. William was one of the 118 men of Portland who signed the following petition as a result of the damage caused on the Isle of Portland by an earthquake on 16 December 1734:[16]

To the Right Hon'ble the Lords Commissioners of his Majesties Treasury.

The Humble Petition of the Inhabitants of the Island of Portland in the County of Dorset. Humbly Sheweth

That on Monday the sixteenth of December last in the morning a great and Sudden Shock of the Earth was felt near the Quarrys at the North End of the said Island by which the earth for more than a mile in length sunk away from the Clift near the Sea and carry'd with it the Way leading to the Piere, Overturned the said Piere, and broke and destroyed the Crane thereon, so that at present it is Impossible to carry down from the Quarry's or to Ship Stone as formerly, by which means his Majesty will loose entirely the Revenue of fourpence per pr Tunn paid by all persons who Shipped Stone off the said Piere; and also the Duty for all Stone raised in the Island and payable to his Maj'tie and the Inhabitants, will be in a great measure lost, and the latter consequently deprived of his Majesty's most gracious Bounty extended to them by his Grant of the 28th of July 1730 Untill the said Way and Piere is Repaired.

Therefore Your Petitioners most humbly pray that your Honour's will take this Unhappy Circumstance into your Consideration and Order that the same may be Repaired fit for Shipping Stone as formerly And they as in duty bound shall ever pray.

Even though William signed this petition itís thought that he was probably a mariner, like his father and his son, rather than a quarryman; possibly he was involved in the transporting of the stone by sea and thus had an interest in the repair of the road and crane used to get the stone from the quarries to the ships.

After 46 years of married life Rebecca died, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 19 March 1768. Eleven months later William died at the age of 73, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 13 February 1769.

 

 

 

William and Rebeccaís only child was William Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 12 July 1724. When he was about 18 years old William married Ann James, who was about 19. No record of their marriage has been found but Ann's mother, Alice James, in her will refers to her daughter Ann as the wife of William Muddle. Ann was the daughter of Thomas and Alice James and she had been baptised at Portland Church on 1 June 1723. William and Ann had five children born at Portland between 1743 and 1762, one of whom died in childhood.

IIn the Militia Ballot List of 1758 William was listed as a master of ship and sailor of Chesil on Portland. There is a large gap of ten years between the births of William and Ann's third and fourth children that might have been caused by William being away from home on lengthy voyage.

When her mother, Alice James, died in March 1762 Ann inherited a half share of her mother's Over Yard of arable land in the West Field called the Head Land of Well Land, the other half share went to Ann's brother Robert James.[17]

From at least 1760 to 1768 William was the captain of the merchant ship the William & Ann, and except for a voyage in 1763 across the Atlantic to Newfoundland, which is possibly an erroneous record, he was engaged in coastal shipping between London and the south-west coast of England, mostly to Weymouth, which was probably his home port.

The 29 July 1760 edition of The Public Ledger reported that on 24 July 1760 the William & Ann captain Muddell sailed from Weymouth for London. The 23 October 1760 edition of The London Chronicle reported that on 22 October 1760 the William & Anne captain Muddel sailed from Weymouth for London. The 26 March 1763 edition of Lloydís List reported that the William & Ann captain Mudeill sailed from Weymouth for Newfoundland. The 24 January 1764 edition of Lloyd's List reported that the William & Ann captain Muddell sailed from Weymouth on 21 January 1764 for London. The 1 February 1764 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 31 January 1764 the William & Ann captain William Muddle had arrived at London from Weymouth. The 18 February 1764 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 17 February 1764 the William & Ann captain Wm Muddle had been cleared outwards from the Port of London for Lyme. The 24 February 1764 edition of Lloyd's List reported that the William & Ann captain Muddell had arrived at Weymouth on 22 February 1764 from London. The 20 March 1764 edition of Lloyd's List reported that the William & Ann captain Muddell sailed from Weymouth on 17 March 1764 for London. The 6 April 1764 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 5 April 1764 the William & Ann captain Wm Muddle had arrived at London from Weymouth. The 1 May 1764 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 30 April 1764 the William & Ann captain Wm Muddle had sailed from London for Weymouth. The 27 June 1764 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 26 June 1764 the William & Ann captain Wm Muddle had been cleared outwards from the Port of London for Weymouth. The 10 July 1764 edition of Lloyd's List reported that the William & Ann captain Muddell sailed from Weymouth on 8 July 1764 for London.

The 19-22 January 1765 edition of The St Jamesís Chronicle or the British Evening-Post reported that on 18 January 1765 the William & Ann captain Muddle had sailed from Portsmouth. The 1 February 1765 edition of Lloyd's List reported that the William & Ann captain Meddle sailed from Portsmouth on 21 January 1765 for London. The 20 March 1765 edition of The Public Advertiser and the 22 March 1765 edition of Lloyd's List reported that the William & Ann captain Muddle had arrived at Dover from London and was bound westward. The 17 May 1765 edition of Lloyd's List reported that the William & Ann captain Muddle sailed from Weymouth for London. The 11 June 1765 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 10 June 1765 the William & Ann captain Wm Muddle had arrived at the Port of London from Weymouth. The 9 September 1765 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 7 September 1765 the William & Ann captain Wm Muddle had departed the Port of London for Weymouth. The 27 September 1765 edition of Lloyd's List reported that the William & Ann captain Muddle arrived at Weymouth on 22 September 1765 from London.

The 8 April 1766 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 7 April 1766 the William & Ann captain Wm Muddell had arrived at the Port of London from Weymouth. The 31 July 1766 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 30 July 1766 the [William &] Ann captain Wm Muddell had arrived at the Port of London from Weymouth. The 16 September 1766 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 15 September 1766 the William & Anne captain William Muddle had arrived at the Port of London from Weymouth. The 11 November 1766 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 8 November 1766 the William & Anne captain Muddle had arrived at Poole from London. The 17 March 1767 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 16 March 1767 the William & Ann captain Wm Muddle had been cleared outwards from the Port of London for Weymouth. The 3 December 1767 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 30 November 1767 the William & Ann captain Muddle had sailed from Weymouth for London. The 27 April 1768 edition of Lloyd's List reported that on 15 April 1768 the William & Ann captain Muddle had sailed from Weymouth for London. The 28 October 1768 edition of The Public Advertiser reported that on 27 October 1768 the William & Ann captain William Muddle had been cleared outwards from the Port of London for Weymouth.

William died when he was about 63 years old, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 24 May 1787. Twelve years later Ann died at the age of 75, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 26 February1799.

 

 

William and Annís eldest child was Rebecca Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 13 November 1743. When she was 41 years old Rebecca married widower John Comben at Portland Church on 20 November 1784. They didnít have any children. Rebecca died at the age of 59, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 2 September 1803. Five years later John died, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 11 December 1808.

 

William and Annís second child was Ann Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 12 December 1745. Ann never married. She was recorded as being a member of the Methodists at Portland on the Poole Circuit from 1798 to 1803.[18] She was living at Chesil when she died at the age of about 71 (not 74 as given on her burial record), and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 11 November 1816.

 

William and Annís third child was William Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 11 December 1748. William died at the age of 10, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 12 February 1759.

 

William and Annís fourth child was William Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 12 August 1759. When he was about 20 years old William married 20-year-old Rebecca Read at Portland Church on 5 July 1779 by licence. Rebecca was the daughter of Thomas and Ann Read, and she had been baptised at Portland Church on 11 March 1759. Rebecca was also the sister of Thomas Read who married Williamís cousin Jane Muddle. William and Rebecca had one child who was probably born in 1793 and died soon after birth. They probably later moved away from Portland as they are not buried there.

 

 

William and Rebeccaís only child was Ann Muddle who was probably born in early March 1793 and died soon after birth before she could be baptised. Ann was buried in Portland Churchyard on 5 March 1793.

 

 

William and Annís fifth child was John Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 17 January 1762. When he was 22 years old John married his 22-year-old second cousin Rebecca Muddle at Portland Church on 21 August 1784. When her mother died in 1786 Rebecca was joint executrix with her sisters Susannah and Elizabeth of her will and inherited several properties on Portland as shown in the detail of the will given in the above section on her parents. John and Rebecca had seven children born at Portland between 1784 (less than three months after their marriage) and 1803. Their last child was baptised in a Methodist Chapel at the same time that Johnís sister Ann was recorded as being a member of the Methodists. Rebecca died at the age of 41 about three weeks after giving birth to her last child and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 21 April 1803.

The Dorset Poll Book of 1807 records John as a voter holding freehold house and land at Portland that he occupied by himself, and that his vote for Pitt and Bankes was rejected and not duly assessed. Then four years later when he was 49 years old John Muddle, a mason, was one of numerous people that the 25 June 1811 will of John Talbot made tenants in common of his leasehold property in Weymouth, presumably with the intention of making them property owners and therefore having polling rights in Weymouth and Melcombe Regis. This will is Appendix 2 of the 1813 House of Commons Report from the Select Committee on the Weymouth & Melcombe Regis Election Petition. A similar will of 24 January 1812 of William Reynolds made John's son William Muddle one of many tenants in common of two other leasehold properties in Weymouth and Melcombe Regis with the same intentions. This will is Appendix 3 of the 1813 House of Commons Report from the Select Committee on the Weymouth & Melcombe Regis Election Petition.

Thirty-three years after Rebeccaís death John was living at Chesil when died at the age of 74 (not 73 as given on his burial record), and was buried in Portland Churchyard on 29 February 1836.

 

Their children were:

Jane 1784-1853  William 1787-1863  Rebecca 1790-?  Ann 1793-?

Robert 1797-1839  Margaret 1800-1891  John 1803-1803

 

 

 

John and Rebeccaís eldest child was Jane Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 20 November 1784. When she was 25 years old Jane married 22-year-old Alexander Chaddock at Portland Church on 10 February 1810. Alexander was the son of Robert and Ann Shaddock, and he had been baptised at Portland Church on 8 February 1788. Alexanderís surname was spelt Shaddock at his baptism, at his marriage and at the baptisms of his children, but had changed to being mostly spelt Chaddock by the time of the 1841 census with some later lapses back to the Shaddock spelling. For consistency the Chaddock spelling has been used throughout his family.

Alexander was a seaman and they lived at Chesil where they had seven children born between 1810 and 1825. In the census of 6 June 1841 they were living at Chesil with their three youngest children, and Alexander was a mariner. Alexander was living at Chesil when he died at the age of 58, and was buried in Portland Churchyard on 7 July 1846. In the census of 30 March 1851 Jane was described as being the widow of a fisherman and living in Chesil Street. Living with her were her two youngest sons, Frederick and Thomas, and also her widowed daughter Ann Bennett and her young daughter. Jane died at the age of 68, her death being registered in Weymouth registration district, which included Portland, during the 2nd quarter of 1853.

 

 

Alexander and Janeís eldest child was Ann Chaddock who was baptised at Portland Church on 23 September 1810. When she was 27 years old Ann married 27-year-old John Bennett at Portland Church on 3 December 1837. John was the son of Henry and Elizabeth Bennett, and he had been baptised at Portland Church on 17 June 1810. John and Ann initially lived at Chesil in Portland where they had one child, a daughter, born in 1838. In the census of 6 June 1841 they were living at Marden Well in Portland with their daughter, and John was working as a quarryman. They were again living at Chesil when John died at the age of 35, and was buried in Portland Churchyard on 30 August 1845. In the census of 30 March 1851 Ann and her daughter were living with her widowed mother, Jane Chaddock, and two of her brothers in Chesil Street.

 

 

John and Annís only child was Elizabeth Jane Bennett, known as Jane, who was baptised at Portland Church on 4 March 1838. In the census of 6 June 1841 Jane, at the age of 3, was living with her parents at Marden Well in Portland. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Jane, now aged 13, was living with her widowed mother in the home of her grandmother Jane Chaddock in Chesil Street in Portland.

 

 

Alexander and Janeís second child was Jane Chaddock who was baptised at Portland Church on 20 September 1812. When she was 19 years old Jane married 22-year-old John Marshalsay Mitchell at Portland Church on 4 February 1832. John was the son of John and Grace Mitchell, and he had been baptised at Portland Church on 21 January 1810. Johnís middle name was recorded as Marshalsay at his baptism, the baptism of his fourth child and on his headstone, but Mosseley at his marriage and the baptism of his second child.

John and Jane lived at Chesil where they had four children born between 1832 and 1839, the first, a daughter, died when only 2 days old. John was recorded as being a quarryman at the baptism of his three youngest children. In the census of 6 June 1841 they were living at Chesil with their three surviving children, all sons, and John was working as a quarryman. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 they were living at Chesil Street with their three sons; John was continuing to work as a quarryman and Jane was working as a dressmaker.

John died on 28 April 1859, at the age of 49, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard at Portland on 2 May 1859. In the census of 7 April 1861 Jane and her son Frederick were living at Spring Gardens in Portland, and Jane was continuing to work as a dressmaker. Seven months later Jane died on 9 November 1861, at the age of 49, and was buried with her husband in St Georgeís Churchyard. John and Janeís grave is marked by an inscribed headstone that also records the death of their eldest son on a voyage to London in 1858.

 

 

John and Janeís eldest child was Jane Shaddock Mitchell who was born at Chesil in Portland during April 1832. Jane died unbaptised when she was only 2 days old, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 21 April 1832.

 

John and Janeís second child was John Alexander Mitchell who was born at Chesil in Portland, and baptised at Portland Church on 21 July 1833. In the census of 6 April 1841 John, at the age of 7, was living with his parents at Chesil. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 John, now aged 17, was working as a quarryman and living with his parents in Chesil Street. John parentís headstone in St Georgeís Churchyard records that he died on a voyage to London in 1858, when he was about 25 years old.

 

John and Janeís third child was Henry William Mitchell who was born at Chesil in Portland, and baptised at Portland Church on 17 April 1836. In the census of 6 April 1841 Henry, at the age of 5, was living with his parents at Chesil. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Henry, now aged 15, was living with his parents in Chesil Street, and he was going to school.

 

John and Janeís fourth child was Frederick Thomas Mitchell who was born at Chesil in Portland, and baptised at Portland Church on 24 February 1839. In the census of 6 April 1841 Frederick, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at Chesil. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Frederick, now aged 12, was living with his parents in Chesil Street, and he was going to school.

 

 

Alexander and Janeís third child was John Richard Chaddock who was baptised at Portland Church on 12 March 1815. John married Mary Ann Russell Miller in about 1837. Mary Ann was the daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Miller, and she had been baptised at Portland Church on 19 October 1817. John and Mary Ann lived at Chesil in Portland where they had eight children born between 1839 and 1857, two of whom, both named Emma, died in childhood.

In the census of 6 June 1841 they were living at Chesil with their then two children, and John was working as a quarryman. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 they were living in the High Street at Chesil with their now four surviving children; John was continuing to work as a quarryman and they had Mary Annís sister Elizabeth Miller living with them. In the census of 7 April 1861 they were living at Mallams in Chesil with four of their children, and John was a quarryman working in the stone quarries. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 they were continuing to live at Mallams, now with their three youngest children and a granddaughter, and John was continuing to work as a quarryman. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were still living at Chesil; John was still a quarryman, and they had their widowed daughter-in-law, Mary Ann Chaddock, and her two sons living with them.

John died on the 10 July 1887, at the age of 72, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard at Portland. Six years later Mary Ann died on 18 September 1893, at the age of 75, and she was buried with her husband in St Georgeís Churchyard. Their grave, which also contains their son Alexander, who died in 1881 at the age of 29, is marked by an inscribed headstone.

 

 

John and Mary Annís eldest child was Jane Ann Chaddock who was born at Portland and baptised at Portland Church on 13 January 1839. In the census of 6 June 1841 Jane, at the age of 2, was living with her parents at Chesil in Portland. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Jane, now aged 12, was living with her parents in the High Street at Chesil, and she was going to school.

 

John and Mary Annís second child was Emma Goldring Miller Chaddock who was born at Portland in about January 1841. In the census of 6 June 1841 Emma, at the age of 5 months, was living with her parents at Chesil in Portland. Emma died at Chesil at the age of 8, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 28 February 1849.

 

John and Mary Annís third child was Joseph Goldrick Miller Chaddock who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1843. In the census of 30 March 1851 Joseph, at the age of 7, was living with his parents in the High Street at Chesil in Portland. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Joseph, now aged 17, was working as a quarryman in the stone quarries and living with his parents at Mallams in Chesil.

 

John and Mary Annís fourth child was Elizabeth Russell Chaddock who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1846. In the census of 30 March 1851 Elizabeth, at the age of 5, was living with her parents in the High Street at Chesil in Portland. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Elizabeth, now aged 15, was living with her parents at Mallams in Chesil, and she was going to school.

 

John and Mary Annís fifth child was Emma Goodridge Miller Chaddock who was born at Portland, and who was baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Portland on 15 March 1849. In the census of 30 March 1851 Emma, at the age of 2, was living with her parents in the High Street at Chesil in Portland. Emma died at Chesil at the age of 3, and she was buried in Portland Churchyard on 15 March 1852.

 

John and Mary Annís sixth child was Alexander Chaddock who was born at Portland, and who was baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Portland on 14 September 1851. In the census of 2 April 1871 Alexander, at the age of 19, was working as a quarryman and living with his parents at Mallams in Chesil. Alexander died on 5 March 1881, at the age of 29, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard at Portland in a grave that was later to contain both of his parents.

 

John and Mary Annís seventh child was Mary Ann Miller Chaddock who was born at Portland, and who was baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Portland on 14 May 1854. In the census of 7 April 1861 Mary Ann, at the age of 7, was living with her parents at Mallams in Chesil, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Mary Ann, now aged 17, was working as a dressmaker and living with her parents at Mallams in Chesil.

 

John and Mary Annís eighth child was Harriet Emma Chaddock who was born at Portland, and who was baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Portland on 6 December 1857. In the census of 7 April 1861 Harriet, at the age of 3, was living with her parents at Mallams in Chesil, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Harriet, now aged 13, was living with her parents at Mallams in Chesil, and still going to school.

 

 

Alexander and Janeís fourth child was Robert Chaddock who was baptised at Portland Church on 6 July 1817.

 

Alexander and Janeís fifth child was Isabella Rebecca Chaddock who was baptised at Portland Church on 9 January 1820. In the census of 6 June 1841 Isabella, at the age of 21, was working as a straw bonnet maker and living with her parents at Chesil. The following year, when she was 22 years old, Isabella married 25-year-old Edward Pearce at Portland Church on 3 December 1842. Edward was the son of Edward and Mary Pearce, and he had been baptised at Portland Church on 24 August 1817. Edward and Isabella had seven children born in Portland between 1843 and 1859, the third of whom died in 1847 when only 9 months old.

In the census of 30 March 1851 they were living at Weston in Portland with their then four surviving children, and Edward was a quarryman. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 they were living at Easton in Portland with their six surviving children, and Edward was continuing to work as a quarryman. In the census of 2 April 1871 they were continuing to live at Easton, now with five of their children, and Edward was still a quarryman.

Edward died on 27 January 1875, at the age of 57, and he was buried in the grave of his son in St Georgeís Churchyard in Portland on 30 January 1875. In the census of 3 April 1881 Isabella and just her spinster daughter Isabella were continuing to live at Easton. Fourteen years after Edwardís death Isabella died on 3 September 1889, at the age of 69, and she was buried with her husband in St Georgeís Churchyard. Their grave, which was to also receive the body of their spinster daughter Isabella in 1896, is marked by an inscribed headstone.

 

 

Edward and Isabellaís eldest child was Mary Jane Pearce who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1843. In the census of 30 March 1851 Mary, at the age of 8, was living with her parents at Weston in Portland, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Mary, now aged 18, was working as a dressmaker and living with her parents at Easton in Portland.

 

Edward and Isabellaís second child was Isabella Rebecca Pearce who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1845. In the census of 30 March 1851 Isabella, at the age of 6, was living with her parents at Weston in Portland, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Isabella, now aged 16, was working as a dressmaker and living with her parents at Easton in Portland. In the census of 2 April 1871 Isabella, at the age of 26, was working as a Tailoress and continuing to live with her parents at Easton. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Isabella, at the age of 36, was continuing to work as a tailoress and living with her widowed mother at Easton. Isabella never married, she died on 26 May 1896, at the age of 51, and she was buried with her parents in St Georgeís Churchyard in Portland. The grave is marked by an inscribed headstone.

 

Edward and Isabellaís third child was Alexander Chaddock Pearce who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1846. Alexander died on 22 March 1847 when only 9 months old, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard in Portland on 25 March 1847. His grave later contained both his parents and his sister Isabella, and is marked by an inscribed headstone.

 

Edward and Isabellaís fourth child was Alexander Chaddock Pearce who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1848. In the census of 30 March 1851 Alexander, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at Weston in Portland. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Alexander, now aged 12, was working as a quarrier and living with his parents at Easton in Portland. In the census of 2 April 1871 Alexander, at the age of 22, was working as a quarryman and continuing to live with his parents at Easton.

 

Edward and Isabellaís fifth child was Edward Pearce who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1850. In the census of 30 March 1851 Edward, at the age of 1, was living with his parents at Weston in Portland. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Edward, now aged 11, was working as a quarrier and living with his parents at Easton in Portland. In the census of 2 April 1871 Edward, at the age of 21, was working as a quarryman and continuing to live with his parents at Easton.

 

Edward and Isabellaís sixth child was Frederick William Pearce who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1854. In the census of 7 April 1861 Frederick, at the age of 7, was living with his parents at Easton in Portland, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Edward, now aged 17, was working as a quarryman and continuing to live with his parents at Easton.

 

Edward and Isabellaís seventh child was Ann Chaddock Pearce who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1859. In the census of 7 April 1861 Ann, at the age of 2, was living with her parents at Easton in Portland. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Ann, now aged 12, was living with her parents at Easton, and she was going to school.

 

 

Alexander and Janeís sixth child was Frederick William Chaddock who was baptised at Portland Church on 24 November 1822. In the census of 6 June 1841 Frederick, at the age of 18, was working as a shoemakerís apprentice and living with his parents at Chesil in Portland. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Frederick, now aged 28, was working as a cordwainer (shoemaker) and living with his widowed mother at Chesil Street.

 

Alexander and Janeís seventh child was Thomas Alexander Chaddock who was baptised at Portland Church on 4 September 1825. In the census of 6 June 1841 Thomas, at the age of 15, was working as a quarryman and living with his parents at Chesil in Portland. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Thomas, now aged 25, was working as a quarryman and living with his widowed mother at Chesil Street. When he was 26 years old Thomas married 19-year-old Jane Byatt at Portland Church on 30 May 1852. Jane was the daughter of Robert and Mary Byatt, and she had been baptised at Portland Church on 30 September 1832. They had three children born at Portland between 1854 and 1859. In the census of 7 April 1861 they were living at Chesil with their three children, and Thomas was working as a quarryman in the stone quarries. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 they were continuing to live at Chesil with their three children, and Thomas was continuing to work as a quarryman. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were still living at Chesil, now with their two youngest children and two lodgers, and Thomas was still a quarryman. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 they had moved to Easton on Portland where Thomas, at the age of 65, was now a licensed victualler; all their children had now left home and they had 19-year-old Rose Fowler as a live-in general domestic servant. After Thomas retired they moved back to Chesil and in the census of 31 March 1901 they were living at 10 Cove Cottages and Thomas was described as living on his own means. Thomas died on 16 September 1906, at the age of 81, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard on Portland. Six months later Jane died on 16 February 1907, at the age of 74, and she was buried with her husband in St Georgeís Churchyard. Their grave is marked by an inscribed headstone.

 

 

Thomas and Janeís eldest child was Mary Gibbs Chaddock who was born at Portland, and who was baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Portland on 18 May 1854. In the census of 7 April 1861 Mary, at the age of 6, was living with her parents at Chesil in Portland, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Mary, now aged 16, was continuing to live with her parents at Chesil, and she was still going to school.

 

Thomas and Janeís second child was Jane Chaddock who was born at Portland, and who was baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Portland on 21 September 1856. In the census of 7 April 1861 Jane, at the age of 4, was living with her parents at Chesil in Portland, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Jane, now aged 14, was continuing to live with her parents at Chesil, and she was still going to school. In the census of 3 April 1881 Jane, at the age of 24, was working as a dressmaker and still living with her parents at Chesil.

 

Thomas and Janeís third child was Elizabeth Chaddock who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1859. In the census of 7 April 1861 Elizabeth, at the age of 1, was living with her parents at Chesil in Portland. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Elizabeth, now aged 11, was continuing to live with her parents at Chesil, and she was going to school. In the census of 3 April 1881 Elizabeth, at the age of 21, was working as a dressmaker and still living with her parents at Chesil.

 

 

John and Rebeccaís second child was William Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 23 February 1787. When he was 25 years old William Muddle was one of about 200 people that the 24 January 1812 will of William Reynolds made tenants in common of two leasehold properties in Weymouth and Melcombe Regis, presumably with the intention of making them property owners and therefore having polling rights in Weymouth and Melcombe Regis. This will is Appendix 3 of the 1813 House of Commons Report from the Select Committee on the Weymouth & Melcombe Regis Election Petition. A similar will of 25 June 1811 of John Talbot had made William's father, John Muddle, one of many tenants in common of another leasehold property in Weymouth with the same intentions. This will is Appendix 2 of the 1813 House of Commons Report from the Select Committee on the Weymouth & Melcombe Regis Election Petition.

William was a mariner, possibly in the Royal Navy as he later served in the Coastguards, and he was at Dover in Kent in 1816 because he was a witness at the marriage of John Bennett to Harriet Hayward at St Mary the Virgin Church in Dover on 13 April 1816. This showed that William couldn't write his name as he just made his mark in the marriage register, and John Bennett must have been a close friend or colleague because William was to name his eldest son John Bennett Muddle. Two years later when he was 31 years old William married Harriet Maythram, who was about 20, at St James the Apostle Church in Dover on 21 June 1818. See the section headed ĎWilliam & Harriet Muddleís Familyí for the rest of their lives and details of their family.

 

John and Rebeccaís third child was Rebecca Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 28 February 1790.

 

John and Rebeccaís fourth child was Ann Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 10 March 1793.

 

John and Rebeccaís fifth child was Robert Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 19 February 1797. Robert was a mariner and had moved to London, when, at the age of 36, he married 29-year-old Mary Ann Barrett at St George the Martyr Church, Borough High Street, Southwark, London on 4 February 1833. See the section headed ĎRobert & Mary Ann Muddleís Familyí for the rest of their lives and details of their family.

 

John and Rebeccaís sixth child was Margaret Muddle who was baptised at Portland Church on 16 February 1800. When she was 23 years old Margaret married 25-year-old Robert Andrews at Portland Church on 18 October 1823. Robert was the son of Thomas and Rebecca Andrews, and he had been baptised at Portland Church on 18 November 1798. Robert was a quarryman and they had seven children born between 1824 and 1840, one of whom, a daughter, died in infancy. They were living at Chesil in 1824, at Easton between 1826 and 1829, then Chesil again between 1831 and 1832, and at Fortuneswell between 1835 and 1838.

In the census of 6 June 1841 they were living at Fortuneswell with their six surviving children and Robert was working as a quarryman. The following year their eldest daughter, Rebecca, died at the age of 17. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 they were living at Fortuneswell with three of their children, and Robert was continuing to work as a quarryman. In 1855 their youngest daughter, Isabella, died at the age of 17, leaving just one of their four daughters to grow into full adulthood. In the census of 7 April 1861 they were living at Fortuneswell with their widowed daughter, Jane Lano, and their youngest son, Ephraim Andrews, and Robert was working as quarryman in the stone quarries. Robert died on 28 April 1870 at the age of 71, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard in the grave that already contained three of his daughters. Their grave is marked by an inscribed headstone.

In the census of 2 April 1871 Margaret and her son Ephraim were living at Reforne Village in Portland, and Margaret was now an annuitant. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Margaret was living with the family of her remarried daughter, Jane Harrison, at 4 Cornwall Terrace, Buckland Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire, and she was still an annuitant. Margaret died at the age of 91, her death being registered in Lambeth registration district in London during the 1st quarter of 1891. Margaret would have still been living with the family of her daughter Jane Harrison, as shortly after Margaretís death in the census of 5 April 1891 Jane was living at 21 Burnley Road in Lambeth.

 

 

 

Robert and Margaretís eldest child was Rebecca Andrews who was baptised at Portland Church on 17 October 1824. In the census of 6 June 1841 Rebecca, at the age of 16, was living with her parents at Fortuneswell in Portland. Then the following year Rebecca died at Fortuneswell on 20 April 1842, at the age of 17 (not 18 as given on her burial record), and she was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard in Portland on 23 April 1842.

 

Robert and Margaretís second child was Robert William Andrews who was baptised at Portland Church on 17 December 1826. In the census of 6 June 1841 Robert, at the age of 14, was working as a quarryman and living with his parents at Fortuneswell in Portland. When he was 23 years old Robert married Elizabeth Stone in Weymouth registration district, which includes Portland, during the 2nd quarter of 1850. They had thirteen children born between 1850 and 1876, five of whom died in infancy, three during the late 1850s and the other two in 1866 and 1874.

In the census of 30 March 1851 they were living at Wakeham in Portland with their then one child, and Robert was a quarryman. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 they were living at Wakeham with their then three surviving children, and Robert was continuing to work as a quarryman in the stone quarries. Sometime between mid-1866 and mid-1867 they moved from Wakeham to Reforne Village in Portland. In the census of 2 April 1871 they were living at Reforne with five of their children, and Robert was a quarryman. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at Reforne with three of their children, and Robert was continuing to work as a quarryman. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at the Britannia Inn in Fortuneswell with four of their children; Robert was still a quarryman and they had 59-year-old farm labourer George Rendall as a boarder.

Robert died on 17 September 1896, at the age of 69, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard in Portland. Nine months later Elizabeth died on 21 June 1897, at the age of 68, and she was buried with her husband in St Georgeís Churchyard. Their grave, which also contains their eldest son, is marked by an inscribed headstone.

 

 

Robert and Elizabethís eldest child was Robert Stone Andrews who was born at Fortuneswell in Portland, and baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Portland on 21 July 1850. In the census of 30 March 1851 Robert, at the age of 9 months, was living with his parents at Wakeham in Portland. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Robert, now aged 10, was working as a stone quarrier and living with his parents at Wakeham. In the census of 2 April 1871 Robert, at the age of 20, was working as a quarryman and living with his parents at Reforne in Portland. In the census of 31 March 1901 Robert, at the age of 50, was publican at the Britannia Hotel in Fortuneswell and living with him were two barmaids, 25-year-old Annie Smedley and 22-year-old Rebecca White. Robert never married, he died on 12 March 1903, at the age of 52, and he was buried with his parents in St Georgeís Churchyard at Portland. The grave is marked by an inscribed headstone.

 

Robert and Elizabethís second child was Rebecca Andrews who was born at Wakeham in Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1853. In the census of 7 April 1861 Rebecca, at the age of 8, was living with her parents at Wakeham, and she was going to school.

 

Robert and Elizabethís third child was John Thomas Andrews who was born at Wakeham in Portland, and baptised at St Georgeís Church in Portland on 30 September 1855. John died at Wakeham when he was only 2 years old, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard in Portland on 22 September 1857.

 

Robert and Elizabethís fourth child was John Thomas Andrews who was born at Wakeham in Portland, and baptised at St Georgeís Church in Portland on 7 February 1858. John died at Wakeham when he was only 10 weeks old, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard in Portland on 13 March 1858.

 

Robert and Elizabethís fifth child was William John Andrews who was born at Wakeham in Portland, and baptised at St Georgeís Church in Portland on 6 March 1859. John died at Wakeham when he was only 9 weeks old, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard in Portland on 16 April 1859.

 

Robert and Elizabethís sixth child was Mary Andrews who was born at Wakeham in Portland in about 1860. In the census of 7 April 1861 Mary, at the age of 1, was living with his parents at Wakeham.

 

Robert and Elizabethís seventh child was Isabella Andrews who was born at Wakeham in Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1861. In the census of 2 April 1871 Isabella, at the age of 9, was living with her parents at Reforne in Portland, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Isabella, now age 19, was a live-in barmaid at Castledown in Portland working for publican William Hodder, who was the husband of her sister Rebecca. In the census of 5 April 1891 Isabella, at the age of 29, was working as a dressmaker and living with her parents at the Britannia Inn in Fortuneswell, Portland.

 

Robert and Elizabethís eighth child was Elizabeth Andrews who was born at Wakeham in Portland, and baptised at St Georgeís Church in Portland on 3 April 1864. In the census of 2 April 1871 Elizabeth, at the age of 7, was living with her parents at Reforne in Portland, and she was going to school.

 

Robert and Elizabethís ninth child was William Andrews who was born at Wakeham in Portland, and baptised at St Georgeís Church in Portland on 3 June 1866. William died at Wakeham when he was only 12 days old, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard in Portland on 12 June 1866.

 

Robert and Elizabethís tenth child was Ephraim Andrews who was born at Reforne in Portland, and baptised at St Georgeís Church in Portland on 7 July 1867. In the census of 2 April 1871 Ephraim, at the age of 3, was living with his parents at Reforne, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Ephraim, now aged 13, was working as a quarryman and living with his parents at Reforne. In the census of 5 April 1891 Ephraim, at the age of 23, was working as a quarryman and living with his parents at the Britannia Inn in Fortuneswell, Portland.

 

Robert and Elizabethís eleventh child was Albert Edward Andrews who was born at Reforne in Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1870. In the census of 2 April 1871 Albert, at the age of 9 months, was living with his parents at Reforne. Albert died at Reforne when only 4 years old, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard in Portland on 5 August 1874.

 

Robert and Elizabethís twelfth child was Beatrice Louisa Andrews who was born at Reforne in Portland, and baptised at St Georgeís Church in Portland on 7 September 1873. In the census of 3 April 1881 Beatrice, at the age of 7, was living with her parents at Reforne, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Beatrice, now aged 17, was living with her parents at the Britannia Inn in Fortuneswell, Portland.

 

Robert and Elizabethís thirteenth child was Clara Eveline Andrews who was born at Reforne in Portland, and baptised at St Georgeís Church in Portland on 9 April 1876. In the census of 3 April 1881 Clara, at the age of 5, was living with her parents at Reforne, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Beatrice, now aged 17, was a dressmakerís apprentice living with her parents at the Britannia Inn in Fortuneswell, Portland.

 

 

Robert and Margaretís third child was Jane Andrews who was baptised at Portland Church on 6 December 1829. Jane died when only 1 year and 11 months old, and she was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard in Portland on 16 October 1831.

 

Robert and Margaretís fourth child was Jane Andrews who was baptised at Portland Church on 18 November 1832. In the census of 6 June 1841 Jane, at the age of 8, was living with her parents at Fortuneswell in Portland. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Jane, now aged 18, was working as a dressmaker and continuing to live with her parents at Fortuneswell.

The following year, when she was 19 years old, Jane married 24-year-old John Lowman Lano at Portland Church on 1 August 1852. John was then a carpenter living at Easton in Portland. He was the son of Thomas and Margaret Lano; he had been born at Portland on 21 March 1828, and baptised at Portland Church on 20 April 1828. John and Jane had three children born in Weymouth registration district between 1852 and 1857, who all died in infancy.

Five years after their marriage and about six months before the birth of their third child John died in Southampton registration district in Hampshire on 22 April 1857, at the age of 29, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard at Portland on 26 April 1857 in the same grave as his three children. An inscribed headstone marks their grave. In the census of 7 April 1861 Jane, at the age of 28, was living with her parents at Fortuneswell in Portland.

Janeís second marriage, at the age of 32, was to widower James Harrison at Alverstoke Church near Gosport in Hampshire on 22 March 1865 by licence. James was a carpenter and the son of carpenter Thomas Harrison. James and Jane had five children; their first child was born at Gosport in Hampshire in 1866, the next two at Portland in 1868 and 1870, and the last two at Portsmouth in 1871 and 1873. In the census of 2 April 1871 they were living at 4 Cornwall Terrace, Buckland Road, Portsmouth with their then four children; James was a master carpenter and they had 15-year-old Jane Fritte as a live-in house servant. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 James was a clerk of works and away from home, but Jane and her five children were continuing to live at 4 Cornwall Terrace, and they had Janeís 81-year-old widowed mother, Margaret Andrews, living with them.

In the census of 5 April 1891 James was a caretaker boarding with John and Lovedey Shall at 5 Aruryn Cottages in Falmouth, Cornwall, and his youngest son, Alfred, was visiting him there. Jane and their other four children were now living at 21 Burnley Road in Lambeth, London. Janeís mother had probably continued to live with them since the last census as she died at Lambeth just before the census was taken. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 James and Jane and three of their children, now all adults, were living at 173 Anerley Road in Penge, London, and James was foreman of works at Trinity House.

 

 

 

John and Janeís eldest child was John Lowman Lano whose birth was registered in Weymouth registration district in Dorset during the 4th quarter of 1852. John died during January 1854 when only 15 months old, and he was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard at Portland in the same grave that was later to hold his two siblings and his father. An inscribed headstone marks their grave.

 

John and Janeís second child was Jane Lano whose birth was registered in Weymouth registration district in Dorset during the 4th quarter of 1854. Jane died on 18 July 1855 when only 8 months old, and she was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard at Portland on 21 July 1855 in her elder brotherís grave that was later to hold her sister and father. An inscribed headstone marks their grave.

 

John and Janeís third child was Isabella Andrews Lano whose birth was registered in Weymouth registration district in Dorset during the 4th quarter of 1857. Isabella died on 10 April 1860 when only 2 years and 6 months old, and she was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard at Portland on 21 April 1860 in the grave of her two elder siblings and her father. An inscribed headstone marks their grave.

 

James and Janeís eldest child (Janeís fourth) was James Harrison who was born at Gosport in Hampshire, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1866. In the census of 2 April 1871 James, at the age of 5, was living with his parents at 4 Cornwall Terrace, Buckland Road, Portsmouth, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 James, now aged 15, was living with his mother at 4 Cornwall Terrace, and he was still going to school. In the census of 5 April 1891 James, at the age of 25, was working as a 2nd division clerk in the Patent Office and living with his mother at 21 Burnley Road in Lambeth, London.

 

James and Janeís second child (Janeís fifth) was Jane Harrison who was born at Portland in Dorset, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1868. In the census of 2 April 1871 Jane, at the age of 3, was living with her parents at 4 Cornwall Terrace, Buckland Road, Portsmouth. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Jane, now aged 13, was living with her mother at 4 Cornwall Terrace, and she was going to school. In the census of 5 April 1891 Jane, at the age of 23, was living with her mother at 21 Burnley Road in Lambeth, London. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Jane, still unmarried at the age of 33, was living with her parents at 173 Anerley Road in Penge, London.

 

James and Janeís third child (Janeís sixth) was John Harrison who was born at Portland in Dorset, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1870. In the census of 2 April 1871 John, at the age of 1, was living with his parents at 4 Cornwall Terrace, Buckland Road, Portsmouth. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 John, now aged 11, was living with his mother at 4 Cornwall Terrace, and he was going to school. In the census of 5 April 1891 John, at the age of 21, was working as a 2nd division clerk in the Somerset House and living with his mother at 21 Burnley Road in Lambeth, London. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 John, still unmarried at the age of 31, was working as a 2nd division clerk in the Civil Service at Somerset House and living with his parents at 173 Anerley Road in Penge, London.

 

James and Janeís fourth child (Janeís seventh) was Robert Thomas Harrison who was born at Portsmouth in Hampshire, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1871. In the census of 2 April 1871 Robert, at the age of 3 months, was living with his parents at 4 Cornwall Terrace, Buckland Road, Portsmouth. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Robert, now aged 10, was living with his mother at 4 Cornwall Terrace, and he was going to school. In the census of 5 April 1891 Robert, at the age of 20, was working as an Australian merchantís clerk and living with his mother at 21 Burnley Road in Lambeth, London. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Robert, still unmarried at the age of 30, was working as a 2nd division clerk in the Civil Service at Somerset House and living with his parents at 173 Anerley Road in Penge, London.

 

James and Janeís fifth child (Janeís eighth) was Alfred Harrison who was born at Portsmouth in Hampshire, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1873. In the census of 3 April 1881 Alfred, at the age of 7, was living with his mother at 4 Cornwall Terrace, Buckland Road, Portsmouth, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Alfred, now aged 17, was visiting his father who was boarding at 5 Aruryn Cottage in Falmouth, Cornwall.

 

 

Robert and Margaretís fifth child was John Thomas Andrews who was baptised at Portland Church on 2 August 1835. In the census of 6 June 1841 John, at the age of 5, was living with his parents at Fortuneswell in Portland. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 John, now aged 15, was working as a quarryman and continuing to live with his parents at Fortuneswell.

When he was 25 years old John married 26-year-old Mary Way in Weymouth registration district, which includes Portland, during the 1st quarter of 1861. Mary was the daughter of Edward and Sarah Way, and she had been baptised at Portland Church on 5 October 1834. In the census of 7 April 1861 John and Mary were living at Mallams in Chesil and John was a stone quarrier. John and Mary had eight children born at Portland between 1862 and 1880. In the census of 2 April 1871 they were living at Mallams with their then four children; John was continuing to work as a quarryman and they had Joseph and Sarah Stone lodging with them. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 they were living in King Street in Fortuneswell with seven of their children.

Mary died on 3 March 1890, at the age of 55, and she was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard at Portland. In the census of 5 April 1891 John and his eldest daughter and four youngest sons were living at 16 King Street in Fortuneswell, and John was still a stone quarryman. John died on 9 February 1894, at the age of 58, and he was buried with his wife in St Georgeís Churchyard at Portland. Their grave is marked by an inscribed headstone.

 

 

John and Maryís eldest child was Margaret Sarah Andrews who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1862. In the census of 2 April 1871 Margaret, at the age of 9, was living with her parents at Mallams in Chesil, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Margaret, now aged 19, was working as a dressmaker and living with her parents in King Street in Fortuneswell. In the census of 5 April 1891 Margaret, at the age of 29, was working on her own account as a dressmaker and living with her widowed father and four youngest brothers at 16 King Street in Fortuneswell.

 

John and Maryís second child was John Thomas Andrews who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1864. In the census of 2 April 1871 John, at the age of 7, was living with his parents at Mallams in Chesil, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 John, now aged 17, was working as a quarryman and living with his parents in King Street in Fortuneswell.

 

John and Maryís third child was Edward W Andrews who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1866. In the census of 2 April 1871 Edward, at the age of 4, was living with his parents at Mallams in Chesil, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Edward, now aged 14, was visiting Joseph and Sarah Stone, who had been lodging with his parents in the 1871 census, at the Victoria Inn in Wyke Regis, Dorset, and he was going to school.

 

John and Maryís fourth child was Robert Andrews who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1869. In the census of 2 April 1871 Robert, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at Mallams in Chesil. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Robert, now aged 12, was living with his parents in King Street in Fortuneswell, and he was going to school. In the census of 5 April 1891 Robert, at the age of 22, was working as a stone quarryman and living with his widowed father at 16 King Street in Fortuneswell.

 

John and Maryís fifth child was Alfred William Andrews who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1871. In the census of 3 April 1881 Alfred, at the age of 9, was living with his parents in King Street in Fortuneswell, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Alfred, now aged 19, was working as a stone quarryman and living with his widowed father at 16 King Street in Fortuneswell.

 

John and Maryís sixth child was Isabella Mary Andrews who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1874. In the census of 3 April 1881 Isabella, at the age of 7, was living with her parents in King Street in Fortuneswell, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Isabella, now aged 17, was visiting Elizabeth Pratt at 8 Newcastle Street in Portsea, Hampshire.

 

John and Maryís seventh child was Ephraim Ernest Andrews who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1877. In the census of 3 April 1881 Ephraim, at the age of 3, was living with his parents in King Street in Fortuneswell. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Ephraim, now aged 13, was living with his widowed father at 16 King Street in Fortuneswell, and he was going to school.

 

John and Maryís eighth child was Albert James Andrews who was born at Portland, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1880. In the census of 3 April 1881 Albert, at the age of 1, was living with his parents in King Street in Fortuneswell. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Albert, now aged 10, was living with his widowed father at 16 King Street in Fortuneswell, and he was going to school.

 

 

Robert and Margaretís sixth child was Isabella Andrews who was baptised at Portland Church on 11 March 1838. In the census of 6 June 1841 Isabella, at the age of 3, was living with her parents at Fortuneswell in Portland. Isabella died at Fortuneswell on 20 June 1855, at the age of 17, and she was buried in St Georgeís Churchyard in Portland on 24 June 1855. Isabella was incorrectly recorded as Elizabeth in the burial register.

 

Robert and Margaretís seventh child was Ephraim Andrews who was born at Portland in about 1840. In the census of 6 June 1841 Ephraim, at the age of 8 months, was living with his parents at Fortuneswell in Portland. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Ephraim, now aged 10, was to living with his parents at Fortuneswell, and he was going to school. In the census of 7 April 1861 Ephraim, at the age of 20, was working as a stone quarryman and living with his parents at Fortuneswell. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Ephraim, still unmarried at the age of 30, was continuing to work as a quarryman and living with his widowed mother at Reforne Village in Portland.

 

 

John and Rebeccaís seventh child was John Muddle who was born at Portland on 27 March 1803. He was baptised by the Methodists on 3 April 1803, the baptism being recorded in the registers of both the Fortuneswell Wesleyan Chapel and the Weymouth Conygar Lane Wesleyan Chapel. John died when he was just under 4 months old, his mother having died about three weeks after he was born, and he was buried in Portland Churchyard on 22 July 1803.


[1] DHC Ad/Dt/W/1693/16 Will of William Muddle proved by Dorset Archdeaconry Court.

[2] TNA ADM 51/4133 Captainís Log Book for HMS Burford 18 March 1696 Ė 20 November 1696.

[3] TNA ADM 52/10 Masterís Log Books for HMS Burford 18 June 1691 Ė 20 November 1696.

[4] TNA ADM 33/194 Shipís Pay Book for HMS Burford 1 January 1695/6 Ė 20 November 1696.

[5] TNA ADM 52/99 Masterís Log Book for HMS Sunderland 26 January 1696 Ė 8 July 1697.

[6] TNA ADM 33/196 Shipís Pay Book for HMS Sunderland 23 January 1695/6 Ė 28 June 1699.

[7] TNA ADM 52/8 Masterís Log Book for HMS Bideford 25 October 1695 Ė 4 November 1698.

[8] TNA ADM 33/194 Shipís Pay Book for HMS Bideford 19 October 1695 Ė 4 November 1698.

[9] TNA PROB 11/474 Will of William Muddle proved by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury.

[10] DHC Ad/Dt/W/1730/45 Will of Grace Muddle proved by Dorset Archdeaconry Court.

[11] DHC Ad/Di/W/1735/21 Will & Inventory of John Muddle proved by Dorset Archdeaconry Court.

[12] DHC Ad/Dt/W/1772/44 Will of Grace Muddle proved by Dorset Archdeaconry Court.

[13] DHC Ad/Dt/W/1774/51 Will of Robert Muddle proved by Dorset Archdeaconry Court.

[14] DHC Ad/Dt/W/1786/45 Will of Margaret Muddle proved by Dorset Archdeaconry Court.

[15] DHC Bc/W/M/110 Will of William Muddle proved by Bristol Consistory Court.

[16] DHC D173412a Petition of the inhabitants of Portland.

[17] DHC Ad/Dt/W/1762/52 Will of Alice James proved by Dorset Archdeaconry Court..

[18] Robert Pearce Methodism in Portland and A Page of Church History, Appendix pp157-172.

 

Copyright © Derek Miller 2005-2015

Last updated 9 September 2015

 

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