THE MUDDLE FAMILIES

THE LINEAGE & HISTORY OF THE MUDDLE FAMILIES OF THE WORLD

INCLUDING VARIANTS MUDDEL, MUDDELL, MUDLE & MODDLE

 

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THE SUSSEX MUDDLE FAMILIES

THE ARDINGLY MUDDLES

 

Introduction

Thomas & Ursula Muddleís Family

William & Mary Muddleís Family

John & Mary Ann Muddleís Family

Henry & Clara Muddleís Family

Henry & Martha Muddleís Family

Frederick & Harriet Muddleís Family

William & Ann Muddleís Family

Edmund & Sarah Muddleís Family

William & Anne/Elizabeth Muddleís Family

Charles & Sarah/Mary Muddleís Family

Charles & Elizabeth Muddleís Family

George & Ann Muddellís Family

Edward & Phoebe Muddellís Family

Charles & Sarah Muddleís Family

Thomas & Elizabeth Muddleís Family

Index of Family Members

Charts

 

 

Charles & Sarah Muddleís Family

 

Chart of Charles & Sarah Muddleís Family

 

Charles Muddle married Sarah Davey at All Saintsí Church in Lindfield on 28 September 1784. They first lived at Lindfield where they had two children born in 1785 and 1787. They then moved to Ditchling where they had two more children born in 1791 and 1794. Charles was a cooper; he was described as such at the marriages of his two youngest children. On 15 March 1808 Sarah was one of the witnesses to the will of William Grames of Wivelsfield, husbandman.[1] Charles died at Ditchling, at the age of 79 (not 78 as given on his burial record), and he was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 7 July 1830.

When Sarahís brother Thomas Davey died in 1835 his will[2] left bequests to each of Sarahís four children that were to be paid when Thomasí housekeeper Ann Jupp died, which happened on 23 April 1851.[3] In the census of 6 June 1841 Sarah, now an 80-year-old widow, was living on the North Side of East End Lane in Ditchling in part of the house owned by her son Thomas, who lived with his family in the other part of the house, and living with her she had 80 year old glover William Davey, who was presumably a relative, and her 12-year-old granddaughter Susan Muddle, daughter of her son Thomas, who was probably helping her grandmother with the housework. Fourteen years after Charles' death, Sarah died at Ditchling, at the age of 83, and she was buried in St Margaret's Churchyard at Ditchling on 29 May 1844.

 

Their children were:

Charles 1785-1866  Hopestill 1787-1841  Mary 1791-1872  Thomas 1794-1879

 

 

 

Charles and Sarahís eldest child was Charles Muddle who was born at Lindfield, and baptised at All Saintsí Church in Lindfield on 20 October 1785. When he was about 17 years old Charles was recorded on the Sussex Militia List of 1803 as being an unmarried carpenter of Lindfield. When he was 26 years old Charles married Mary Haynes at All Saintsí Church in Lindfield on 31 March 1812. They initially lived at Lindfield, where in 1813 their only child was born, who only lived for two weeks. They then moved to Ditchling, as Charles was recorded in the 1828, 1833, 1839 and 1840 editions of Pigot & Co.'s Directory of Sussex as being a cooper of Ditchling. Then in the census of 6 June 1841 they were living in William Street in Brighton; Charles was a journeyman carpenter and they had 85-year-old Thomas Potterson lodging with them. Mary died in Brighton's St Peter's Parish at the age of 61, and was buried in St Margaret's Churchyard at Ditchling on 5 May 1845.

In 1851 Charles inherited a legacy from his motherís late brother Thomas Davey of £200 plus a share of any residue of Thomas Daveyís estate. In the census of 30 March 1851 Charles was a journeyman carpenter lodging with the family of butcher James Halman at 39 William Street in Brighton. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Charles was a carpenter lodging with the family of coach maker James Peacock at 46 Surrey Street in Brighton. Twenty-one years after Maryís death Charles died at Brighton, at the age of 80 (not 81 as given on his burial record), and he was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 20 May 1866.

 

 

Charles and Maryís only child was Charles Muddle who was born at Lindfield in late March 1813. (No baptism record has been found, but it seems fairly certain that this is Charles and Maryís child coming just a year after their marriage.) Charles died at Lindfield when only two weeks old, and he was buried in All Saintsí Churchyard at Lindfield on 11 April 1813.

 

 

Charles and Sarahís second child was Hopestill Muddle who was born at Lindfield, and baptised at All Saintsí Church in Lindfield on 3 July 1787. Hopestill never married. She died at Hurstpierpoint at the age of 53, and she was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 20 March 1841. Hopestill died intestate and administration of her estate should have been done by her mother who was then her next of kin, but it wasnít, and it was only after her motherís death in May 1844 that administration of Hopestillís estate, which was valued at under £200, was granted to her brother Thomas Muddle by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury on 26 September 1844.[4] If Hopestill had still been alive in 1851 she would have inherited a legacy from her motherís late brother Thomas Davey of £200 plus a share of any residue of Thomas Daveyís estate.

 

Charles and Sarahís third child was Mary Muddle who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 6 March 1791. In the census of 6 June 1841 Mary, at the age of 50, was a live-in servant to the household of clergyman James Garbett at the Rectory in Clayton. The following year Mary was a 51-year-old spinster working as a servant at Clayton when she married 45-year-old bachelor Henry William Ockenden who was a farmer and also from Clayton, at St John the Baptistís Church in Clayton on 19 December 1842. Henry was the son of William and Ann Ockenden; he had been born at Ditchling and baptised at St Margaret's Church in Ditchling on 9 June 1797. Henry and Mary didnít have any children as Mary was too old.

In 1851 Mary inherited a legacy from her motherís late brother Thomas Davey of £200 plus a share of any residue of Thomas Daveyís estate. In the census of 30 March 1851 they were living at Gooselease in Hurstpierpoint and Henry was a farmer in partnership with his father and brother. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 they were living in Clayton and Henry was now a grocer. In the census of 2 April 1871 they were living in London Road at Clayton (probably the same place as in 1861) and Henry was a shopkeeper.

Mary died at Clayton, at the age of 80, and she was buried in St John the Baptist's Churchyard at Clayton on 18 January 1872. Three months later Henry died at Clayton, at the age of 74, and he was buried in St John the Baptist's Churchyard at Clayton on 30 April 1872.

 

 

Charles and Sarahís fourth child was Thomas Muddle who was born at Ditchling in Sussex, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 14 June 1794. When he was 24 years old Thomas married 26-year-old Susanna Colvin Washington, also known as Susan, at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 26 August 1818. Susan was the daughter of George and Mary Washington; she had been born at Keymer in Sussex and baptised at St Cosmas and St Damian Church in Keymer on 22 July 1792. Thomas and Susan lived at Ditchling where they had four children born between 1819 and 1828, while Thomas was working as a cooper.

The 6 November 1820 edition of The Sussex Advertiser published a long list of those men in the Sussex Militia who had not turned up for training at Chichester during September and were considered deserters. One of those on the list was 35-year-old labourer William Buck of Brighton who was working for Thomas Muddle of Ditchling.

It seems that in mid-1827 Thomas was probably already in partial occupation of the house that he was to purchase in mid-1828, because in an advert in the 9 July 1827 edition of The Sussex Advertiser for the sale of property by auction on 21 July 1827, lot 3 was a copyhold dwelling house in two tenements, with gardens and orchards, in the occupation of Messers. Muddle and Davy and holden of the Manor of Ditchling Garden. It's not totally clear from this that the Mr Muddle was Thomas, or if it might possibly have been his father, and the Mr Davy was probably a relative of his mother.

Just five days after the birth of Thomas and Susan's last child, at the court of Ditchling Garden Manor held on 16 June 1828 it was recorded that for the purchase money of £140 Anthony Tanner sold to Thomas Muddle, a cooper of Ditchling, all that messuage with the coalhouse and garden thereto belonging, by estimate 30 perches, situate in Ditchling, being part of a tenement before Hardin's and before Earl's, paying 6d yearly rent to the Lord of the Manor. Abutting the road from Ditchling to East End on the south, to the other parts of the said tenement intended at that court to be surrendered to William Field on the east and west and to land of William Davies on the north, and Thomas Muddle was admitted on payment of a fine of 6d to the Lord of the Manor.

At the same court Thomas Muddle then conditionally surrendered (mortgaged) the above property to Jenny Tanner, a spinster of Ditchling, for £150 at 5% interest.

And at the same court for the purchase money of £140 Anthony Tanner sold to William Field a builder of Brighton, all that piece of garden ground, by estimation 20 perches, situate in Ditchling, abutting the road from Ditchling to East End on the south, to land of James Brown on the west, to land of William Davis on the north and to a garden and coalhouse which have been surrendered at that court to Thomas Muddle on the east. And also all that orchard with the stable and fellmongers shop (heretofore used as a barn), by estimation 30 perches, situate in Ditchling, being part of a tenement before Hardenís and before Earlís, paying 6d yearly rent. Abutting the said road to the south, to the premises at that court surrendered to Thomas Muddle on the west, to land of the said William Davis on the north and to a field at that court intended to be surrendered by Anthony Tanner to Jesse Kensett on the east, and William Field was admitted on payment of a fine of 6d to the Lord of the Manor.

And at the same court the quitrent of 6d payable on the above whole tenement late Tannerís and before Hardenís, was apportioned with 3d to the portion Thomas Muddle has been admitted to and 3d to the portion William Field has been admitted to.[5]

The 1832 Sussex Poll Book recorded that Thomas Muddle of Ditchling was a registered voter but had not voted in the election held on 22 December 1832 for Knights of the Shire (Members of Parliament) for the Eastern Division of Sussex. Thomas was eligible to be a voter because of his ownership of the property in East End Lane.

The 29 July 1833 edition of The Sussex Advertiser reported on the Ninth Annual Ditchling Gooseberry Show held on Monday 22 July 1833, which was for all garden produce, not just gooseberries, and listed among the prize-winners in the Cottagers of Ditchling section, Thomas Muddle for the third best vegetable.

Then seven years after his first property purchase, at a court of Ditchling Garden Manor held on 24 April 1835 for the purchase money of £58 William Field sold to Thomas Muddle, a cooper of Ditchling, all that orchard with the stable and fellmongers shop (heretofore used as a barn), by estimation 30 perches, situate in Ditchling, being part of a tenement late Tannerís before Hardenís and before Earlís, and part of a tenement paying 3d yearly rent. Abutting the road from Ditchling to East End to the south, to the land of Thomas Muddle on the west, to land of the late William Davis and now John Borrer esquire on the north and to a field of Jesse Kensett on the east, and Thomas Muddle was admitted on payment of a fine of 6d to the Lord of the Manor.

At the same court Thomas Muddle then conditionally surrendered (mortgaged) the above property to Jenny Tanner, a spinster of Ditchling, for £80 at 5% interest.

This property was one part of the portion sold to William Field in 1828 and at the same court the quitrent of 3d payable on the whole tenement, late Tannerís and before Hardenís, was apportioned with 2d to the portion Thomas Muddle has just been admitted to and 1d to the portion still held by William Field.[6]

On 17 May 1837 Thomas was one of the jurors at the inquest held by coroner Francis Harding Gell at The Bull in Ditchling into the killing of Amos Hemsley at Plumpton the previous day.[7] Later that year the 1837 Sussex Poll Book recorded that Thomas Muddle of Ditchling in Lewes Polling District had voted in the election held on 4 & 5 August 1837 for two Knights of the Shire (Members of Parliament) for the Eastern Division of Sussex, and that Thomas had voted for the Hon. Charles Compton Cavendish and Herbert Barrett Curteis Esq.

Then at a court of Ditchling Garden Manor held on 21 July 1838 Thomas Muddle conditionally surrendered (mortgaged) to Jenny Tanner all that messuage with the coalhouse and garden thereto belonging, by estimate 30 perches, situate in Ditchling, being part of a tenement late Tannerís and formerly Hardenís, paying 3d yearly rent. Abutting the road from Ditchling to East End on the south, to the tenement now or late of William Field on the east and west and to land now or late of William Davies on the north, for £100 at 5% interest, in addition to the existing mortgage of £150 at 5% interest on this property that Thomas had taken out with Jenny Tanner in 1828.[8]

 

 

John Tamplin Parsons, who lived next-door to Thomas Muddle and his family, was a shoemaker and parish clerk, and in his Parish Clerk's Memoranda Book recorded his shoemaker's account with Thomas Muddle from 10 March 1839 to 29 June 1841. During this period of just over two years Thomas spent nearly £6 on buying new boots and shoes for his family and having repairs done. There were three pairs of new shoes for his wife Susan at 5s 6d per pair, a pair of new boots for her at 7s 6d, new boots for himself and his son Thomas at 13s per pair and a pair of new boots for his son Charles at 17s 6d. There were also numerous repairs to boots for Thomas, his wife, and their four children, Mary, Thomas, Charles and Susan, and repairs to shoes for his wife; the cost of these repairs being anything from 2d to 3s 4d. From this it seems that only his wife wore shoes and the rest of the family only wore boots.[9]

At a court of Ditchling Garden Manor held on 29 October 1840 it was recorded that out of court on 2 September 1839 for the purchase money of £50 William Field sold to Thomas Muddle, all that piece of garden ground, by estimation 20 perches, situate in Ditchling, paying 1d yearly rent. Abutting the road from Ditchling to East End on the south, to land then or late of James Brown on the west, to land then or late of William Davis on the north and to a garden and coalhouse of Thomas Muddle, a brewer of Ditchling, on the east, and Thomas Muddle was admitted on payment of a fine of 6d to the Lord of the Manor. At this court Thomas Muddle was also one of the Homage, which was a jury of manorial tenants who were there to see that the business of the court complied with the Customs of the Manor.[10]

Thomas Muddle now owned all three parts of the plot sold by Anthony Tanner in 1828, and the Ditchling Tithe Map of 1840 with Apportionments of 1843 shows Thomas Muddle owning and occupying plot 528 that consisted of a house, garden and brewery occupying an area of 1 rood & 8 perches for which the Tithe Charge was 4 shillings per year. This was the property on the North Side of East End Lane in Ditchling that Thomas had purchased in three parts in 1828, 1835 and 1839, but the area given on the Tithe Map, which is considered to be accurate, shows that the estimated areas of the three parts given in the manorial records were almost twice their actual areas.

 

 

The Tithe Map and Apportionments also record Thomas Muddle as the occupier of four plots of land scattered around Ditchling that were owned by the Sprotts Charity. These were plot 441, which was a meadow of 1 acre, 3 roods & 29 perches called Spatham Field; plot 466, which was an arable field of 4 acres & 30 perches called Broomy Croft; plot 773, which was an arable field of 1 acre, 1 rood & 24 perches called Marlpit; and plot 831, which was a meadow of 1 acre, 1 rood & 34 perches called Beggers Bush. So Thomas must have by now become a farmer as well as a cooper and brewer.[11]

In the census of 6 June 1841 Thomas and Susan were living in part of the house owned by Thomas on the North Side of East End Lane in Ditchling. Living with them were; their eldest daughter Mary; Susanís father George Washington, their servant William Hemsley, and Mary and Thomas Clewer. Thomas described himself as a cooper, and living in the other part of the house was Thomasí mother and his daughter Susan.

The 14 April 1846 edition of The Sussex Advertiser reported that at the meeting of the Lewes Magistrates on 7 April Thomas Muddle and John Butcher were appointed Overseers of the Poor for Ditchling. Then on 24 June 1846 Thomas Muddle was appointed by the Postmaster General to be the Post Office Receiver for Ditchling.[12] It seems that Thomas must have then started running the Ditchling Post Office from his premises on the North Side of East End Lane. He was now, it seems, a cooper, brewer, farmer, Overseer of the Poor and Post Office Receiver.

Then at a court of Ditchling Garden Manor held on 8 November 1850 for the purchase money of £50 Thomas Muddle sold to Robert Boddington, a surgeon of Ditchling, all that piece of garden ground, by estimation 20 perches, situate in Ditchling, paying 1d yearly rent. Abutting the road from Ditchling to East End on the south, to land then or late of James Brown on the west, to land then or late of William Davis on the north and to a garden and coalhouse of the said Thomas Muddle on the east, and Robert Boddington was admitted on payment of a fine of 6d to the Lord of the Manor.[13] This was the portion of plot 528 that Thomas had purchased from William Field for £50 in 1840.

In the census of 30 March 1851 Thomas and Susan were still living in the house owned by Thomas in East End Lane, but now with just their youngest daughter Susan, and Leonard Hemsley, who was their live-in farm labourer, living with them. Thomas now described himself as a master cooper and farmer of 31 acres, who employed one man. The other part of the house owned by Thomas was now occupied by his married daughter Mary with her husband Walter Illman and their two sons. In the 1851 edition of the Post Office Directory of the Six Home Counties Thomas Muddle was listed as being a cooper and also the Post Office Receiver at Ditchling. And it was in 1851 that Thomas inherited a legacy from his motherís late brother Thomas Davey of £228 plus a share of any residue of Thomas Daveyís estate. Then in about 1852 Thomas started employing his 8-year-old grandson Robert Muddle as a farm labourer.

Then at a court of Ditchling Garden Manor held on 11 October 1853 for the purchase money of £150 Thomas Muddle sold to Thomas Ashdown, a grocer and brewer of Ditchling, all that orchard with the stable and fellmongers shop (heretofore used as a barn), by estimation 30 perches, situate in Ditchling, late Fieldís before Tannerís before Hardenís, paying 2d yearly rent. Abutting the road from Ditchling to East End to the south, to the land of the said Thomas Muddle on the west, to land late of John Borrer esquire on the north and to a field of Jesse Kensett on the east, and Thomas Ashdown was admitted on payment of a fine of 6d to the Lord of the Manor. And at the same court William Tanner, the executor of the late Jenny Tanner, acknowledges receipt of all the principal of £80 and interest due from Thomas Muddle on conditional surrender of 24 April 1835 for the above property of orchard, stable and fellmongerís shop.[14] This was the portion of plot 528 that Thomas had purchased from William Field for £58 in 1835 and which was to be later purchased by George Greenyer, who built a chapel on it. Thomas now owned just the central part of plot 528, which was the part that contained his house, and much later was to become known as Brewers.

In the 1855 edition of the Post Office Directory of the Six Home Counties, the 1858 edition of Melville & Co.ís Directory & Gazetteer of Sussex and the 1859 edition of the Post Office Directory of Sussex Thomas Muddle was listed as being a cooper and also the Post Office Receiver at Ditchling.

In the census of 7 April 1861 Thomas and Susan were still living in the house owned by Thomas in East End Lane at Ditchling that was now referred to as the Post Office. They had three of their grandsons, Robert and Thomas Muddle and George Illman, living with them, and Thomas now described himself as a master cooper and farmer of 32 acres, employing one man. The other part of the house owned by Thomas was listed in the census as being unoccupied, his daughter Mary and her family were now living in North Street.

†At a court of Ditchling Garden Manor held on 18 November 1864 it was recorded that out of court on 21 September 1864 Thomas Muddle conditionally surrendered (mortgaged) to William Tanner esquire of Patcham and Thomas Neve esquire of Benenden, the executors of the late Jenny Tanner, all that messuage with the coalhouse and garden thereto belonging, by estimate 30 perches, situate in Ditchling, and late Tannerís and before Hardenís, paying 3d yearly rent. Abutting the road from Ditchling to East End on the south, to the tenement now or late of William Field on the east and west and to land now or late of William Davies on the north, for £25 at 5% interest, in addition to the £200 at 5% interest still outstanding on the existing mortgages of £150 & £100 at 5% interest that Thomas had taken out on this property in 1828 and 1838.[15]

It seems that it was probably about this time that their son Thomas and his wife Eliza moved to Ditchling to help Thomas run his businesses because their son, who had been a cooper, was recorded as being a farmer in mid-1865. Their son and his wife probably lived in that part of the house owned by Thomas in East End Lane that was unoccupied in 1861. In the 1866 and 1867 editions of the Post Office Directory of Sussex Thomas Muddle was listed as being a cooper and the receiver for the Post & Money Order Office & Savings Bank at Ditchling, but itís not clear if these entries refer to the father or the son, because at the end of 1866 Thomas sells his house in East End Lane and the families all move to North Street in Ditchling, where in 1871 the son was recorded as the cooper and postmaster.

At a court of Ditchling Garden Manor held on 26 November 1869 it was recorded that out of court on 22 December 1866 William Tanner & Thomas Neve, the executors of Jenny Tanner, acknowledged in writing their satisfaction in the payment of all the principal and interest on three conditional surrenders by Thomas Muddleís on all that messuage with the coalhouse and garden thereto belonging, made on 26 June 1828 for £150, on 21 July 1838 for £100 and on 21 September 1864 for £25.[16]

At the same court it was recorded that out of court on 29 December 1866 Thomas Muddle sold to George Greenyer, a grocer of Ditchling, for the purchase money of £400, all that messuage with coalhouse and garden thereto belonging, by estimation 30 perches, situate in Ditchling, and late Tannerís and before Hardenís, paying 3d yearly rent. Abutting the road from Ditchling to East End on the south, to the tenement then or late of William Field on the east and west and to land then or late of William Davies on the north, and George Greener was admitted on payment of a fine of 6d to the Lord of the Manor. This was the portion of plot 528 that Thomas had purchased from Anthony Tanner for £140 in 1828.[17]

It must have been just days after Thomas had sold his house in East End Lane and the family had moved to North Street in Ditchling that Susan died at Ditchling, at the age of 74, and was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 11 January 1867. Ten months later Thomas was described as being a cooper, when, at the age of 73, he married 56-year-old widow Elizabeth Waller, whose maiden name was Harland, at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 27 November 1867. Elizabeth was the daughter of William and Mary Harland; she had been born at Clayton in Sussex and baptised at St John the Baptistís Church in Clayton on 24 November 1811.

In †the census of 2 April 1871 Thomas and Elizabeth were living on the East Side of North Street in Ditchling. Thomasí grandson George Illman was still living with them, together now with James Waller, Elizabethís son from her previous marriage, and two lodgers. Thomas was now described as being a farmer of 20 acres employing one boy. His son Thomas was living next-door in a house called The Limes and described as a cooper and postmaster, having, it is assumed, taken over these parts of his father businesses. Thomas died at Ditching, at the age of 85, and he was buried with his first wife in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 22 June 1879. Their grave is marked by an inscribed headstone.

The register of St Margaretís Church in Ditchling records that two babies, called John Richard and Myra, were baptised on 26 January 1880, their parents were recorded as being unknown, but said to be Michelet, and to be of unknown residence. A note pasted into the register next to these entries and signed by Thomas Hutchinson the vicar states ďThese two babies were brought stealthily into the Parish and left to be nursed by Mrs Muddle who professed not to know the place of their birth or their parentage. Under these circumstances they were conditionally baptised.Ē Elizabeth seems to be the only one who could be the Mrs Muddle living in Ditchling at this time, †and was she involved in the practice of baby farming?

In the census of 3 April 1881 Elizabeth, at the age of 69, was living at Golden Square, East Street, Ditchling; she was working as a laundress, and she had 75-year-old widower William Brown as a lodger. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Elizabeth was still living in East Street at Ditchling, but now had William Waller, her 48-year-old unmarried son from her first marriage living with her. In the census of 31 March 1901 Elizabeth, at the age of 89, was living at 1 School Cottages, East End Lane, Ditchling. Her son William Waller was still living with her, and now also her 23-year-old granddaughter Elizabeth Hopkins, and she had 83-year-old widower James Toft as a boarder. Elizabeth died at East Chiltington (did she end her days in Pouchlands Hospital?) at the age of 94, and she was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 13 December 1905.

 

Their children were:

Mary 1819-1894  Thomas 1820-1876  Charles 1825-1885  Susan 1828-1902

 

 

 

Thomas and Susanís eldest child was Mary Muddle who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 28 July 1819. In the census of 6 June 1841 Mary was living with her parents on the North Side of East End Lane in Ditchling. Then later that year when she was 22 years old Mary married 22-year-old labourer Walter Illman at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 2 November 1841. Walter was the son of Thomas and Mary Illman; he had been born at Ditchling and baptised at St Margaret's Church in Ditchling on 18 July 1819. Walter and Mary lived at Ditchling where they had ten children born between 1842 and 1860. Their first four children died when only very young babies.

Walter was recorded at his children's baptisms as being a labourer except in 1845 and 1846 when his occupation was given as carrier. In the census of 30 March 1851 Walter and Mary and their then two surviving children were living in part of the house owned by Mary's father in East End Lane at Ditchling, and Walter was working as a jobbing gardener. The other part of this house was still occupied by Mary's parents. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Walter and Mary were living in North Street at Ditchling with their four youngest children, and Walter was still a gardener. In the census of 2 April 1871 they were still living in North Street at Ditchling, now with three of their children, and Walter was continuing to work as a gardener. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 they were continuing to live in North Street at Ditchling, now with their youngest son, and their married daughter Sarah Ann Keam and her daughter where staying with them; Walter was now again described as being a jobbing gardener.

Walter died at Ditchling at the age of 70 (not 71 as given on his burial record), and he was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 20 November 1889. In the census of 5 April 1891 Mary was living with her now married son Henry and his family, in a cottage in East End Lane at Ditchling. Mary died at Ditchling at the age of 75 (not 76 as given on her burial record), and she was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 21 December 1894.

 

 

Walter and Maryís eldest child was Susan Illman who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 1 September 1842. Susan died at Ditchling when only four days old, and she was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 3 September 1842.

 

Walter and Maryís second child was Mary Ann Illman who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 9 June 1843. Mary Ann died at Ditchling when only one month old, and she was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 27 August 1843.

 

Walter and Maryís third child was Walter Illman who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 19 May 1844. Walter died at Ditchling when only four days old, and he was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 22 May 1844.

 

Walter and Maryís fourth child was Thomas Illman who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 8 August 1845. Thomas died at Ditchling when only five days old, and he was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 12 August 1845.

 

Walter and Maryís fifth child was George Washington Illman who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 19 December 1846. In the census of 30 March 18 51 George, at the age of 4, was living with his parents in East End Lane at Ditchling. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 George, now age 14, was staying with his grandparents, Thomas and Susan Muddle, at the Post Office in East End Lane at Ditchling, and he was working as a houseboy. In the census of 2 April 1871 George, at the age of 24, was continuing to live with his grandfather and now step-grandmother, who now lived on the East Side of North Street, and George was now working as a groom.

When he was 31 years old George married Maria Sabin in Lewes registration district during the 1st quarter of 1878. They had at least one child, a daughter, born at Keymer in 1880. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at 2 Park Mead Villas in Keymer with their daughter, and George was working as a gardener. George died at Keymer at the age of 38, and he was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 16 April 1885. In the census of 5 April 1891 Maria and her daughter were lodging in three rooms at 35 Bonchurch Road in Keymer, which was the home of Henry and Ellen Mitchell, and Maria was working as a cook.

 

 

George and Mariaís only known child was Lilly Maria Illman who was born at Keymer, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1880. She was baptised at St Margaret's Church in Ditchling on 9 September 1881. In the census of 3 April 1881 Lilly, at the age of 1, was living with her parents at 2 Park Mead Villas in Keymer. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Lilly, now aged 11, was, together with her widowed mother, lodging in three rooms at 35 Bonchurch Road in Keymer, and she was going to school.

 

 

Walter and Maryís sixth child was William Illman who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 9 July 1849. In the census of 30 March 1851 William, at the age of 1, was living with his parents in East End Lane at Ditchling. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 William, now age 11, was staying with his widowed grandmother, Mary Illman, in East Street at Ditchling, and he was working as a farm labourer. In the census of 2 April 1871 William, at the age of 21, was living with his parents in North Street at Ditchling, his grandmother having died in 1870, and he was now a gardener like his father. William died at Ditchling, at the age of 26, and he was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 9 April 1876.

 

Walter and Maryís seventh child was Sarah Ann Illman who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 11 April 1852. In the census of 7 April 1861 Sarah Ann, at the age of 9, was living with her parents in North Street at Ditchling, and she was going to school. Then in the census 2 April 1871 Sarah Ann, now aged 19, was a live-in cook to the family of schoolmaster William Barryman at 39 Brunswick Road in Hove, and her brother John was also there as a live-in servant. When she was 22 years old Sarah Ann married William John Keam in Lewes registration district during the 4th quarter of 1874. They had at least one child born at Chailey in 1875. In the census of 3 April 1881 Sarah Ann and her daughter were staying with her parents in North Street at Ditchling.

 

 

William and Sarah Annís only known child was Alice Mary A Keam who was born at Chailey, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1875. In the census of 3 April 1881 Alice, at the age of 5, was, together with her mother, staying with her grandparents, Walter and Mary Illman, in North Street at Ditchling.

 

 

Walter and Maryís eighth child was John Illman who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 24 December 1854. In the census of 7 April 1861 John, at the age of 6, was living with his parents in North Street at Ditchling and he was going to school. Then in the census 2 April 1871 John, now aged 16, was a live-in servant to the family of schoolmaster William Barryman at 39 Brunswick Road in Hove, and his sister Sarah Ann was also there as a live-in cook. When he was 25 years old John married Frances Gillam in Steyning registration district during the 1st quarter of 1880. Itís thought that they probably didnít have any children. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were both live-in servants to the family of widow Maria Young at 12 Brunswick Square in Hove, John was a butler and Frances was a housemaid. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 they were both live-in servants to the family of magistrate Thomas Cave at 4 Eastern Terrace in Brighton, John was a butler and Frances was a housemaid. In the census of 31 March 1901 they were living at 14 Trinity Street in Brighton, and John was working as a restaurant waiter.

 

Walter and Maryís ninth child was Anna Harriet Illman who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 6 December 1857. In the census of 7 April 1861 Anna, at the age of 3, was living with her parents in North Street at Ditchling and she was going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Anna, now aged 13, was still living with her parents in North Street at Ditchling and she was now going to school. In the census of 3 April 1881 Anna, at the age of 23, was a domestic cook and a pauper in Race Hill Workhouse at Brighton.

 

Walter and Maryís tenth child was Henry Charles Illman who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 2 December 1860. In the census of 7 April 1861 Henry, at the age of 5 months, was living with his parents in North Street at Ditchling. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Henry, now aged 10, was still living with his parents in North Street at Ditchling and he was now going to school. In the census of 3 April 1881 Henry, at the age of 20, was continuing to live with his parents in North Street at Ditchling, and he was now a gardener like his father.

When he was 21 years old Henry married 31-year-old Elizabeth Jane Hammond at St Margaret's Church in Ditchling on 24 December 1881. They were both then living at Ditchling where Henry was a gardener, and Elizabeth gave her age as 26. Elizabeth was the daughter of William and Elizabeth Hammond; she had been born in Brighton and baptised the Church of St Nicholas in Brighton on 24 February 1850. Henry and Elizabeth had one child born at Ditchling in 1886. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living in a cottage in East End Lane at Ditchling with their daughter; Henry's widowed mother was also living with them, and Henry was continuing to work as a gardener. Henry mother died in 1894 and in the census of 31 March 1901 Henry, Elizabeth and their daughter were living in North Road at Ditchling; Henry was a domestic gardener and they had 3-year-old Bertie Cherriman as a boarder.

Henry died at the age of 63 (not 61 as given on his death certificate), his death being registered in Brighton registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1924. Eight years later Elizabeth died at the age of 83, her death being registered in Cuckfield registration district during the 1st quarter of 1933.

 

 

 

Henry and Elizabethís only child was Annie Elizabeth Illman who was born at Ditchling in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1886. In the census of 5 April 1891 Annie, at the age of 4, was living with her parents in a cottage in East End Lane, Ditchling. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Annie, now aged 14, was living with her parents in North Road, Ditchling. In the census of 2 April 1911 Annie, at the age of 24, was a live-in housemaid to the family of brewery director John Thomas Aldridge at Rose Mount in Hassocks, Sussex.

When she was 39 years old Annie married her 1st cousin, 37-year-old Walter Percy Hammond, known as Percy, at St Cosmas & St Damian Church in Keymer, Sussex on 6 April 1926. They were both then living at 99 Parklands Road in Hassocks and Percy was a Regimental Sergeant Major. Percy was the son of William Thomas Hammond, the brother of Annie's mother, and his wife Ellen Elizabeth Baker, and he had been born at Brighton in Sussex on 17 June 1888.

Percy and Annie didn't have any children of their own but they did have foster children. There were two boys, John and Karl. John had been removed from his family and taken into care for stealing, which run in his family, and Karl had been abandoned by his mother as a baby. Percy and Annie had wanted to adopt Karl but they were not allowed to.

Another boy whom they either foster or who stayed with them as a boarder for several years was Frederick Henry Butler, who had been taken into care at the age of seven and looked upon Percy and Annie as his parents. While living with them Frederick went to Hassocks' School and later worked at Allwood Brothers Nursery in Hassocks.

Percy and Annie continued to live at 99 Parklands Road in Hassocks until they moved to Dunsinane, Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire where they are known to have been by early 1942, which was probably soon after they moved there; Percy having obtained the position of college porter. They were still living at Glenalmond in about 1954 when Frederick Butler's daughter remembers visiting them there. But it was probably soon after this, probably when Percy retired, that they returned to Sussex to live in Brighton.

They were living at 49 Ryde Road in Brighton when Annie died at Brighton on 14 January 1961, at the age of 74. Annie died intestate and administration of her estate, valued at £770 18s, was granted to Percy by Lewes Probate Office on 8 February 1961. Seventeen years later Percy died at Brighton, at the age of 90, his death being registered during the 4th quarter of 1978.

 

 

 

Thomas and Susanís second child was Thomas Muddle who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 10 September 1820. When he was about 20 years old Thomas married 28-year-old Eliza Carpenter at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 25 August 1840. They were both then living in Ditchling and Thomas was working as a cooper. Eliza was the daughter of William and Martha Carpenter, and she had been baptised at St Peter the Great Church in Chichester on 17 April 1812. Thomas and Eliza lived at Ditchling where Thomas worked as a cooper, and where they had three children, born between 1841 and 1846, the last two of whom died at the ages of 16 and 3.

In the census of 6 June 1841 they were living on the West Side of Ditchling High Street; Thomas was a journeyman cooper and Eliza was a milliner, and they had 20-year-old Mary Penfold, who was a milliner's apprentice, living with them. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 they were living in North Street at Ditchling, Thomas was still a journeyman cooper, but Eliza was now a dressmaker employing two apprentices. Their then two surviving children were living with them (though their daughter Emily was away visiting the Holford family at Scaynes Hill on census night), together with Eliza's widowed mother, Martha Carpenter, who was acting as the family housekeeper, and Eliza's sister Emily Carpenter, who was a journeywoman dressmaker, and Mary Ann Holford, who was one of Eliza's apprentices.

The cooperage business in Church Street, Uckfield that had been operated for many years by the Muddle family, who were distant relatives of Thomas, had passed to John & Sarah Gaston in mid-1837. John Gaston died in 1840 and his widow Sarah continued to run the business for the next eleven years until she sold it to Thomas in mid-1851, and as a result placed the following notice in the 1 July 1851 edition of The Sussex Advertiser:

Mrs Sarah Gaston.

COOPER, UCKF1ELD,

BEGS to return her grateful thanks to her numerous kind friends in Uckfield and its vicinity, for the support which has been so liberally bestowed upon herself and late husband for so many years, and to inform them that she has disposed of her business to Mr THOMAS MUDDLE.

All persons indebted to Mrs GASTON are requested to pay the amount to Mr THOMAS PENTRCOST, Church Street, Uckfield, who is authorised to receive the same, and by whom, likewise, all claims upon the estate will, if found correct, be settled.

Uckfield, June 24, 1851.

It seems that when Thomas first moved to Uckfield in mid-1851 Eliza didn't go with him, probably because of her dressmaking business. On the 28 October 1851 Eliza took a yearly tenancy from Robert Boddington on the cottage in Ditchling called the Corner House, and took in Francis Hallett, a dissenting preacher, as a lodger. Then in January 1852 Eliza wished to move to Uckfield and asked Richard Boddington to take Francis Hallett as the tenant in place of her, but he said it had to wait until the half year was up in April, so when she left Eliza paid Francis Hallett 50s as her portion of the half-year's rent up to April. This information all came out in Eliza's evidence at the County Court in Lewes on 23 November 1858 when Robert Boddington was trying to get Francis Hallett evicted from the Corner House, and it was reported in the 30 November 1858 edition of The Sussex Advertiser.

The Post Office Directory of the Six Home Counties for 1855, which would have been compiled from information gathered in 1854, listed Thomas Muddle as a cooper in Uckfield. This business seems to have been something of a failure and only lasted for three years before going bankrupt, as the 12 September 1854 edition of The Sussex Advertiser and the 26 September 1854 edition of The London Gazette published the following insolvency notice:

Whereas a Petition of Thomas Muddle, of Church-street, Uckfield, in the county of Sussex, Cooper, whose wife, Eliza Muddle, carries on the business of a Dressmaker and Milliner, an insolvent debtor, having been filed in the County Court of Sussex, at the County Hall, Lewes, and an interim order for protection from process, having been given to the said Thomas Muddle, under the provisions of the Statutes in that case made and provided, the said Thomas Muddle is hereby required to appear before the said Court, on the 3rd day of October next, at twelve of the clock at noon precisely, for his first examination touching his debts, estate, and effects, and to be further dealt with according to the provisions of the said Statutes; and choice of the creditors' assignees is to take place at the time so appointed. All persons indebted to the said Thomas Muddle, or that have any of his effects, are not to pay or deliver the same but to Mr. Edgar Blaker, Clerk of the said Court, at his office, at No. 211, High-street, Lewes, the Official Assignee of the estate and effects of the said insolvent.

The 1 October 1854 edition of Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette recorded that petitions were to be heard on 3 October 1854 at Lewes County Court concerning the insolvency of Thomas Muddle cooper of Uckfield, and then the 1 November 1854 edition of Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette recorded that final orders on his insolvency had been made by the court on 31 October 1854. The 7 November 1854 edition of The Sussex Advertiser reported on this last court hearing where some of the creditors alleged that there were several false entries in his schedule in order to bring his liabilities within £300, but the judge dismissed this objection and granted the final order.

After his bankruptcy Thomas and his family moved to Brighton and the 1858 edition of Melville & Co.'s Directory & Gazetteer of Sussex listed Mrs Muddle as a dressmaker at 41 Montpelier Street in Brighton, and the 1859 edition of Folthorp's Court Guide and General Directory for Brighton, Hove and Cliftonville listed Mrs T Muddle as a dressmaker at 41 Montpelier Street in Brighton. In the census of 7 April 1861 Thomas and Eliza were living at 41 Montpelier Street in Brighton; Thomas was a cooper and Eliza a dressmaker. Living with them was their niece Emma Carpenter, who was the daughter of Eliza's brother William, and she was working as an assistant, presumably to Eliza in her dressmaking business. They also had two lodgers who were both Oxford students. Thomas at this time was almost certainly working as a journeyman cooper and didn't have his own cooperage business.

Then the following year the 7 October 1862 edition of The London Gazette recorded that Thomas Muddle of 41 Ship Street in Brighton (presumably this is an error and should be 41 Montpelier Street) a milliner trading under the name Mudell was registered as a bankrupt and all his stock-in-trade, goods and personal effects put into trust for the benefit of his creditors. This was obviously Eliza's dressmaking business that had gone bankrupt but as a married woman her business would have legally been in her husband's name.

 

 

It was presumably after this second bankruptcy that Thomas and Eliza moved back to Ditchling and started to assist Thomas' father in his businesses of cooper, postmaster and farmer, and they probably lived in part of the house owned by Thomas' father in East End Lane at Ditchling. When his son married in 1865 Thomas was described as being a farmer. Then at the end of 1866 Thomas' father, at the age of 72, sold his house in East End Lane at Ditchling. The families must have then moved to North Street in Ditching because in the census of 2 April 1871 Thomas and Eliza were living at the Limes on the East Side of North Street in Ditchling; Thomas was now a cooper and postmaster, and Eliza was still a dressmaker. Living with them was 14-year-old Louisa Blackman, who was Eliza's apprentice, and living next door was Thomas's father who now gave just farmer as his occupation, so it seems that Thomas had probably taken over his father's businesses of cooper and postmaster when they all moved to North Street. In the 1874 edition of the Post Office Directory of the Six Home Counties Thomas Muddle was listed as being a cooper and also the receiver at the Post & Money Order Office & Savings Bank in Ditchling. Probably it was soon after this that Thomas and Eliza moved back to Brighton.

Thomas died at Brighton at the age of 55, and he was buried in St Margaret's Churchyard at Ditchling on 23 March 1876. Eliza was living at 30 Beaconsfield Road in Preston near Brighton when her spinster sister Emily Carpenter died there on 5 July 1879: Eliza was present at her sister's death and also registered her death. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Eliza and her orphaned grandson, Charles Mudell, were living with the family of labourer Richard Beard at 6 Princes Crest Road in Brighton, and Eliza was working as a schoolmistress. In the census of 5 April 1891 Eliza, at the age of 79, was still working as a schoolmistress, and she was lodging in two rooms with the family of provision assistant Charles Poring at 145 Sackville Road in Hove. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Eliza, who was now retired and living on her own means, was living in two rooms at 52 Rutland Road, Aldrington, Hove. Living in the other four rooms at this address were three spinster sisters, Sarah, Emma and Clara Carpenter, who were the unmarried daughters of Eliza's brother William. Eliza died at Aldrington at the age of 92, and she was buried (under the name Mudell) in St Margaret's Churchyard at Ditchling on 31 October 1904.

 

 

Thomas and Elizaís eldest child was Charles Muddle who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 26 September 1841. In the census of 30 March 1851 Charles, at the age of 9, was living with his parents in North Street at Ditchling and he was going to school. Charles had changed his name to Mudell and was working as a warehouseman when at the age of about 24 he married Isabella Laurence at Holy Trinity Church, Islington, London, on 1 August 1865. They had two children, born at Hatcham in the Greenwich registration district of London in 1866 and 1868. In the census of 2 April 1871 they were living at Eldon Cottage, Albert Road, Camberwell, London with their two sons; Charles was a commercial clerk and they had 16-year-old Ellen Walker as a live-in servant.

Charles became mentally ill and was admitted to Peckham House Lunatic Asylum in Camberwell on 8 December 1873 where he stayed for nearly four months until he was discharged on 30 March 1874, having had his illness relieved.[18]

Charles and Isabella were living at 14 Cloudesley Square in Islington when Charles died at Ditchling in Sussex on the 4 August 1875, at the age of 34. Charles died intestate and administration of his effects, which were valued at under £300, was granted to Isabella on 3 November 1875 by the Principal Probate Registry in London. Isabella was living at 9 Lower Tulse Hill, Brixton, Surrey, when she died on 13 April 1880 at the age of 39. Isabella died intestate, and it was not until 24 years after her death that administration of her effects, which were valued at £750, was granted to her son, Charles, on 17 March 1904 by London Probate Registry.

 

 

Charles and Isabellaís eldest child was Charles Lawrance Mudell who was born at Hatcham in the Greenwich registration district of London, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1866. In the census of 2 April 1871 Charles, at the age of 4, was living with his parents at Eldon Cottage, Albert Road, Camberwell, London. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Charles, who was now an orphan at the age of 14, was living with his widowed grandmother Eliza Mudell in the home of labourer Richard Beard at 6 Princes Crest Road in Brighton. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Charles, at the age of 24, was a grocerís assistant boarding with the family of George King at 17 Grafton Road, Islington, London. In the census of 31 March 1901 Charles, at the age of 34, was a fish hawker working on his own account, and boarding with the family of Charles King at 75 Hornsey Road in Islington. In 1904 Charles was described as being a fishmonger when he was granted administration of his motherís estate, 24 years after her death. In the census of 2 April 1911 Charles, at the age of 44, was a dried fishmonger working on his own account and living by himself in one room at 26 Durham Road, Finsbury Park North, Islington. Charles never married. He died at the age of 83, his death being registered in Islington registration district in London during the 4th quarter of 1949.

 

Charles and Isabellaís second child was George Herbert Mudell whose birth was registered in Greenwich registration district in London during the 4th quarter of 1868. In the census of 2 April 1871 George, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at Eldon Cottage, Albert Road, Camberwell, London. George died at the age of four, his death being registered in Camberwell registration district in London during the 4th quarter of 1872.

 

 

Thomas and Elizaís second child was Emily Eliza Muddle who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 4 June 1843. In the census of 30 March 1851 Emily, at the age of 8, was a visitor in the home of farmer Henry Holford at Walster Common, Scaynes Hill, but she presumably normally lived with her parents in North Street at Ditchling, where she was going to school. Emily died at Ditchling at the age of 16, and she was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 7 July 1859.

 

Thomas and Elizaís third child was Susan Matilda Muddle who was born at Ditchling, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 1 November 1846. Susan died at Ditchling when she was only three years old, and she was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 13 September 1849.

 

 

Thomas and Susanís third child was Charles Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 15 December 1825, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 2 April 1826. In the census of 6 June 1841 Charles, at the age of 15, was a live-in apprentice to butcher Charles Wood on the North Side of East End Lane in Ditchling. Charles Wood's house and butchers shop was on the northern corner of the junction between Ditchling High Street and East End Lane (plot 526 on the Ditchling Tithe Map) and only a few yards from the home of Charles Muddle's parents, who lived in the next house along East End Lane.

 

 

When he was 17 years old Charles married 19-year-old Mary Ellen Davey at St Michael and All Angels Church in South Malling near Lewes on 14 August 1843. Mary was the daughter of carpenter Thomas Davey and his wife Barbara; she had been born at Ditchling on 13 February 1824, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 6 June 1824. Charles and Mary gave their ages as 20 and 21 on their marriage certificate, and had probably gone to South Malling to marry because Mary had been carrying their first child for about four months, and as Charles was an apprentice he was not allowed to marry without his masterís permission. They lived in North Street at Ditchling, where Charles was a butcher, and where they had thirteen children born between 1844 and 1867. Three of their children died while babies and another child died when only ten years old.

In the census of 30 March 1851 Charles and Mary Ellen were living in North Street at Ditchling with their five children, and they had 14-year-old Jane Ashdown as their live-in house servant. Charles was a master butcher employing one boy, and Mary Ellen was a laundress.

The 14 June 1853 edition of The Sussex Advertiser reported that at the Lewes Magistrates Meeting held on 7 June 1853 Mr H J Bartlett, the Inspector of Weights and Measures summoned a number of traders in Ditchling for having deficient weights in their possession, including Charles Muddle who had a deficient 1lb weight for which he was fined 5s with 11s costs.

In the census of 7 April 1861 Charles and Mary Ellen were continuing to live in North Street at Ditchling, now with four of their daughters, and Charles was still a butcher and Mary Ellen was still a laundress. In the census of 2 April 1871 they were still living in North Street at Ditchling, now with their four youngest children; Charles was still a butcher, but Mary Ellen was now described as being a butcher's wife, so she had probably given up being a laundress and was helping Charles in his butcher's business.

Mary Ellen died at Ditchling on 19 April 1875 at the age of 51 (not 52 as given on her death certificate and burial record), and she was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 25 April 1875. In the census of 3 April 1881 Charles was living in North Street at Ditchling with his daughter Emily and son Albert, and he was described as being a pork butcher. Charles died at Ditchling on 7 April 1885 at the age of 59 (not 60 as given on his death certificate, headstone and burial record), and he was buried with his wife in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 12 April 1885. Their grave is marked by an inscribed headstone.

 

Their children were:

Robert 1844-1913  Thomas 1845-1879  William 1847-1858

Barbara Ellen 1849-1937  Edward 1850-1851  Alice Mary 1853-1936

Emily 1855-1855  Charles 1856-1856  Laura 1857-1924  Emily 1859-1916

George 1861-1915  Minnie 1863-1892  Albert 1867-1938

 

 

 

Charles and Mary Ellenís eldest child was Robert Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 1 January 1844, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 28 January 1844. In the census of 30 March 1851 Robert, at the age of 7, was living with his parents in North Street at Ditchling, and he was going to school.

It was probably in 1852, when he was 8 years old, that Robert started working as a farm labourer for his grandfather Thomas Muddle. The 24 May 1859 edition of The Sussex Advertiser reported that at the meeting of the East Sussex Agricultural Association held at the Star Hotel in Lewes on 17 May 1859, one of the 12 boys, out of 40 competitors under 16 years of age, awarded a 10s prize was 15-year-old Robert Muddle of Ditchling, who had been in the service of Thomas Muddle for 7 years. The prizes were to be presented at the Annual General Meeting held at the Riding School at Firle Place on 3 June 1859. In the census of 7 April 1861 Robert, at the age of 17, was living with his grandparents, Thomas and Susan Muddle, at the Post Office in East End Lane at Ditchling, and he was working as a farm labourer.

Robert was a farrier, when, at the age of 21, he enlisted for 12 years' service in the 16th Lancers at Westminster on 27 October 1864, as Private 716, and received a bounty of £1 and free kit. His army records describe him as being 5ft 7ľin tall, with a fresh complexion, grey eyes, brown hair and a smallpox scar. Robert was first stationed at Colchester but had transferred to Norwich by March 1865 when he spent 26 days in hospital with orchitis (inflammation of the testicles) and was treated with leeches. Then on 28 June 1865 he embarked for India, where, from 10 September 1865, he was stationed at Bangalore in southern India. While at Bangalore Robert was in hospital six times; the first time was for 11 days in November 1865 with dysentery, then in September 1867 it was 19 days with orchitis again. In May 1868 Robert was in hospital for 3 days, followed by 93 days from May to August 1869 with bubo (enlarged lymph nodes in groin or armpit from infection by gonorrhoea, syphilis, tuberculosis or plague). Then for 11 days in September 1869 Robert was in hospital suffering from the effects of the climate, and in June 1870 it was 5 days as the result of an accident.

From early 1872 Robert was stationed at Secunderabad, which is near Hyderabad in central India. Almost immediately he in hospital again; for 9 days with ague caused by malaria from 28 January to 5 February; for 13 days from the effects of the cold from 27 February to 2 March; and for 17 days with syphilis from 15 to 31 July. Then on 30 October 1872 Robert re-engaged with the 16th Lancers for a period of time that would give him a total of 21 years' service. He was soon back in hospital; for 8 days during November with ague caused by malaria, for which he was again treated with quinine. Robert then had almost 3 years free of illness before he was again in hospital; first with diarrhoea for 8 days during August 1875, and then for 24 days from 9 November to 2 December 1875 with syphilis.

In late 1876 Robert left India and arrived back in England on 8 January 1877. He was stationed at Shorncliff near Folkestone in Kent where he immediately applied for and became a Shoe Smith. While at Shorncliff he was in hospital for 10 days during August 1877 with an ulcer on his cornea. The following month he was transferred to Aldershot where he was stationed from 5 September 1877. While in Aldershot Robert was in hospital twice; for 56 days from 26 February to 23 April 1878 from the effects of the cold, and then for 12 days from 26 April to 7 May 1878 with an abscess.

Robert was 35 years old and had served in the 16th Lancers for 14 years when on 14 February 1879 he volunteered to join the 17th Lancers, which he did the following day. This change of regiment was presumably because the authorities were looking for suitable volunteers to bring the 17th Lancers up to full strength as they were about to be sent to fight in the Zulu Wars.

The 17th Lancers sailed for South Africa on 25 February 1879. Robert had been Private 2204 for his first 10 days in the 17th Lancers, but the day after they sailed he was again appointed as a Shoe Smith. The regiment arrived in Natal on 6 April 1879 and moved on into Zululand. The final battle of the Zulu War was at Ulundi on 4 July 1879 when about 20,000 Zulus surrounded the British infantry, which formed a square with the 17th Lancers at its centre. Then when the Zulu attack faltered the 17th Lancers and other cavalry were ordered to charge and decimated the fleeing Zulu warriors, pursuing them until not a single live Zulu was left on the Mahlabatini plain. Robert was awarded the South Africa 1877-1879 medal with 1879 clasp for his service in the Zulu War during 1879.[19]

 

 

Robert reverted to being a Private on 17 September 1879. Then on 19 October 1879 the 17th Lancers embarked on the troopship HMS Seraphis for India, arriving at Bombay on 11 November 1879. Three days later they were stationed at Mhow, which is 330 miles northeast of Bombay. On 19 February 1880 Robert was granted 3d good conduct pay. While at Mhow Robert was in hospital twice; for 12 days in September 1881 with ague; and then for 15 days in July and August 1882 with a boil. On 28 October 1882 Robert's good conduct pay was increased to 4d, and then on the 1 July 1883 he was promoted to Sergeant Farrier. The regiment then transferred to Lucknow, which is in the Ganges Plain 430 miles northeast of Mhow, where they were stationed from 23 January 1884. On 1 January 1885 Robert was recommended for another Good Conduct Medal by his Regimental Commanding Officer but this was not sanctioned.[20] Robert's 21 years of service was completed on 27 October 1885 but he opted to extend his service beyond 21 years. Robert had just one spell in hospital while in Lucknow; for 11 days during March 1890 with influenza during an epidemic.

 

 

The regiment then left India, embarking on HMS Seraphis on 9 October 1890, and arriving back in England on 3 November 1890. The following day they were stationed at Shorncliff in Kent. In the census of 5 April 1891 Robert was a Sergeant in the 17th Lancers at Shorncliff Camp. Robert was then transferred to Hounslow where he was stationed from 18 July 1891. He was in hospital there for 69 days, from 30 December 1891 to 7 March 1892, with inflammation of his neck glands. Robert, at his own request, was discharged on 17 March 1893, at the age of 49, after having served 28 years and 141 days. While in the army Robert gained a 4th class certificate of education, and he was described as being of regular habits, temperate and of good conduct.[21]

Two and a half years after leaving the army, when he was 52 years old, Robert married 37-year-old spinster Betsy Waller at St Margaret's Church in Ditchling on 30 November 1895. They were both then living in Ditchling where Robert was working as a smith, and the two witnesses to their marriage were Mabel and Eliza Mustchin, who were Betsy's half-sisters. Betsy was the daughter of Thomas Russell Waller and his wife Ann; she had been born at Ditchling and baptised at St Margaret's Church in Ditchling on 3 May 1857. Betsy's father Thomas Russell Waller died in 1862, at the age of 27, and her mother then married Henry Mustchin in 1869.

Robert and Betsy didn't have any children. In the census of 31 March 1901 they were living in West Street at Ditchling and Robert was working as a blacksmith. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at Wynn's Place, West Street, Ditchling; Robert was now retired and described himself as an army pensioner. Living with them was 9-year-old William Hodges who was going to school and described as a boarder; he had been born in Brighton and it's thought that he was probably a foster child. Wynn's Place was also known as Wing's Place or The Old House and at this time was divided into four tenements.

 

 

Robert died at Ditchling on 7 January 1913, at the age of 69, and he was buried in St Margaret's Churchyard at Ditchling on 11 January 1913. His grave was later used for two more burials; on 8 December 1921 Ann Mustchin, who was Betsy's widowed mother and probably living with Betsy, was buried there. Then nine years later 16-year-old Daisy May Cotton was buried there on 27 December 1930 and a small headstone with the inscription: In loving memory of my dear foster daughter 'Molly' Daisy Mary Cotton who died 23rd Dec 1931 aged 16 now marks this grave; note that there are two errors on this headstone, the deceased second name should be May and the year should be 1930. As Betsy would have had her husband and mother buried in this grave it seem certain that it was Betsy who had Molly buried there, and that Molly was therefore Betsy's foster daughter. Molly was the illegitimate daughter of 36-year-old widow Agnes Cotton, who worked as a hotel cook; she had been born at 50 Park Street in Brighton on 7 August 1914, and died in Pouchlands House at East Chiltington, which was Chailey Union Workhouse then functioning as the local hospital.

The 1924 edition of Kelly's Directory of Sussex lists Mrs Muddle as living at 6 High Street, Ditchling and it was about this time that she looked after the four young children of Lewis and Sarah Stenning while their mother was in hospital. This comes from a book by one of these children, John Stenning, in which he writes:[22]

My mother was suffering from an illness, she did not go out so much and was always nervy, breathless and tired. For a few weeks she had to go away and stay in for hospital treatment. My sisters Vena and Iris and my brother Dennis and I went to stay at six, High Street, Ditchling with an elderly lady called Mrs Muddle. It was pretty basic in those days. If we wanted to go to the toilet, we had to go through next door's kitchen to a loo at the top of the garden. Later we actually moved next door.

Vena had been born in 1915, Iris in 1917, John in 1919 and Dennis in 1921, and their mother died in 1927, so this must have happened between 1921 and 1927. This and the information on Daisy May Cotton and William Hodges indicates that Betsy was one of those women who looked after children both as long term foster children and as children in need of short term care, in the days before Official Social Services.

Twenty-one years after Robert's death Betsy was still living at 6 High Street in Ditchling when she died at the age of 77, and was buried in St Margaret's Churchyard at Ditchling on 14 November 1934. Betsy's grave is unmarked but further along in the same row as the grave in which she had buried her husband, mother and foster daughter.

 

 

Charles and Mary Ellenís second child was Thomas Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 16 September 1845, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 23 September 1845. In the census of 30 March 1851 Thomas, at the age of 5, was living with his parents in North Street at Ditchling, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Thomas, now aged 15, was staying with his grandparents, Thomas and Susan Muddle, at the Post Office in East End Lane at Ditchling, and he was working as a farm labourer. In the census of 2 April 1871 Thomas, at the age of 25, was a draperís porter lodging with Edward and Frances Wysnarll at 9 Cambridge Street in Brighton. Thomas never married. He died in Brighton Workhouse at the age of 34, and he was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 19 September 1879.

 

Charles and Mary Ellenís third child was William Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 15 August 1847, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 24 October 1847. In the census of 30 March 1851 William, at the age of 3, was living with his parents in North Street at Ditchling. William died at Ditchling at the age of ten, and he was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 18 April 1858.

 

Charles and Mary Ellenís fourth child was Barbara Ellen Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 5 August 1849, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 25 November 1849. In the census of 30 March 1851 Barbara, at the age of 1, was living with her parents in North Street at Ditchling. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Barbara, now aged 11, was continuing to live with her parents in North Street at Ditchling, and she was going to school. In the census of 2 April 1871 Barbara, at the age of 21, was a live-in general servant to the family of upholsterer George Walker at 146 Western Road in Brighton. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Barbara, at the age of 31, was a live-in cook to the family of widow Cecilia Newcome at 5 Atlingworth Street in Brighton.

In the census of the 5 April 1891 Barbara, at the age of 41, was the live-in housekeeper for widower Charles Brooker and his daughter at Sunnyside Lodge, Hillside, Montrose, Angus, Scotland. Charles was a coachman and probably working for Thomas Paton who was living in Sunnyside House. The following year when she was 42 years old Barbara married 38-year-old widower Charles Brooker at Holy Trinity Church in Worthing on 10 January 1892. They were both then living at Howard Street in Worthing, and Charles was a coachman. Charles had been baptised at Farnham Church in Surrey on 6 February 1853, the son of Edward and Mary Ann Brooker.

Charles and Barbara probably didnít have any children, and it seems likely that they separated. In the census of 31 March 1901 Charles was a bathchairman living at 45 Sloane Street in Brighton, and he had another bathchairman, 56-year-old widower Charles Jackson, as a boarder, whilst Barbara was a live-in cook to the household of Jennie Duval at 11 Lansdowne Place in Hove.

Charles died at the age of 49 (not 48 as given on his death certificate), his death being registered in Brighton registration district during the 2nd quarter of 1902. In the census of 2 April 1911 Barbara was a live-in cook to widow Amy Collier at Norfolk Lodge, Vallance Gardens, Hove. Also living there was a general domestic servant and two nurses, and a note on the census form stated that Amy Collier was suffering from chronic heart decease. Barbara died at the age of 88, her death being registered in Worthing registration district in Sussex during the 4th quarter of 1937.

 

Charles and Mary Ellenís fifth child was Edward Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 8 December 1850, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 23 February 1851. In the census of 30 March 1851 Edward, at the age of 3 months, was living with his parents in North Street at Ditchling. Edward died at Ditchling when only 11 months old, and he was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 10 December 1851.

 

Charles and Mary Ellenís sixth child was Alice Mary Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 10 February 1853, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 22 May 1853 . She was baptised as Alice Mary, but her birth was registered as just Alice. In the census of 7 April 1861 Alice, at the age of 8, was living with her parents in North Street at Ditchling, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Alice, now aged 18, was a live-in domestic servant to the family of John Izard at 31 Round Hill Crescent in Brighton.

When she was 26 years old Alice married 22-year-old John Williams at St Peter's Church in Brighton on 17 May 1879. Alice was then living at 5 Eaton Place in Brighton, and John was a carpenter living at 53 Hendon Street in Brighton. John was the son of John and Mary Williams; he had been born at Snodland in Kent and his birth registered during the 1st quarter of 1857. John and Alice had six children born at Brighton between 1880 and 1892. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at the Attree Arms, 81 St Georges Road, Brighton, with their then one child, and John was a carpenter and beer retailer. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at 31 Wood Street in Brighton with their now five children, and John was working as a carpenter.

John died at the age of 41 (not 44 as given on his death certificate), his death being registered in Brighton registration district during the 2nd quarter of 1898. In the census of 31 March 1901 as Alice was a widow living at 34 Regent Street in Brighton with her six children, and she was working as a cook. In the census of 2 April 1911 Alice was still living at 34 Regent Street in Brighton; she described herself as a housekeeper working on her own account at home and now had her four youngest children, who were all young working adults, living with her. Alice died at the age of 83, her death being registered in Brighton registration district during the 1st quarter of 1936.

 

 

 

John and Aliceís eldest child was Alice Mary Williams who was born at Brighton in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1880. In the census of 3 April 1881 Alice, at the age of 1, was living with her parents at the Attree Arms, 81 St Georges Road, Brighton. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Alice, now aged 11, was living with her parents at 31 Wood Street in Brighton, and she was going to school. In the census of 31 March 1901 Alice, at the age of 21, was working as a tailoress and living with her widowed mother and her five siblings at 34 Regent Street in Brighton.

 

John and Aliceís second child was Edith Ellen Williams who was born at Brighton in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1881. In the census of 5 April 1891 Edith, at the age of 9, was living with her parents at 31 Wood Street in Brighton, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Edith, now aged 19, was living with her widowed mother and her five siblings at 34 Regent Street in Brighton, and she was acting as their housekeeper as her mother was working as a cook.

 

John and Aliceís third child was John Albert R Williams who was born at Brighton in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1884. In the census of 5 April 1891 John, at the age of 6, was living with his parents at 31 Wood Street in Brighton, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 John, now aged 16, was working as a van guard and living with his widowed mother and his five siblings at 34 Regent Street in Brighton. In the census of 2 April 1911 John, at the age of 26, was working as a railway guard and living with his widowed mother and three of his siblings at 34 Regent Street in Brighton.

 

John and Aliceís fourth child was Charles James Williams who was born at Brighton in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1887. In the census of 5 April 1891 Charles, at the age of 3, was living with his parents at 31 Wood Street in Brighton. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Charles, now aged 13, was working as an errand boy and living with his widowed mother and his five siblings at 34 Regent Street in Brighton. In the census of 2 April 1911 Charles, at the age of 23, was working as a dairy roundsman and living with his widowed mother and three of his siblings at 34 Regent Street in Brighton.

 

John and Aliceís fifth child was William Williams who was born at Brighton in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1889. In the census of 5 April 1891 William, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at 31 Wood Street in Brighton. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 William, now aged 12, was living with his widowed mother and his five siblings at 34 Regent Street in Brighton. In the census of 2 April 1911 William, at the age of 22, was working as a dairy roundsman and living with his widowed mother and three of his siblings at 34 Regent Street in Brighton.

 

John and Aliceís sixth child was Minnie Nora Williams who was born at Brighton in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1892. In the census of 31 March 1901 Minnie, at the age of 8, was living with her widowed mother and her five siblings at 34 Regent Street in Brighton. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Minnie, now aged 18, was working as a dressmaker's assistant and living with her widowed mother and three of her brothers at 34 Regent Street in Brighton.

 

 

Charles and Mary Ellenís seventh child was Emily Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 25 November 1855, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 30 November 1855. Emily was only a young baby when she died at Ditchling, and was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 30 December 1855.

 

Charles and Mary Ellenís eighth child was Charles Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 8 October 1856, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 9 October 1856. Charles was only a young baby when he died at Ditchling, and was buried in St Margaretís Churchyard at Ditchling on 19 October 1856.

 

Charles and Mary Ellenís ninth child was Laura Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 5 August 1857, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 1 November 1857. In the census of 7 April 1861 Laura, at the age of 3, was living with her parents in North Street at Ditchling. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Laura, at the age of 13, was a live-in domestic servant to the family of printer and bookseller John Farncombe at 92 Eastern Road in Brighton. When she was 23 years old Laura married 23-year-old Henry Alfred James Streeter at St Peterís Church in Croydon on 24 June 1880. Laura was then living at Duppaís Hill in Croydon, and Henry was a plumber living at St Peterís Street in Croydon. Henry was the son of George and Rittey Streeter, and he had been baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Croydon on 5 July 1857.

In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living in Cliffe Road at Croydon and Henry was continuing to work as a plumber. They had six children born at Croydon between 1881 and 1897. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at 56 St Peters Street in Croydon with their then four children, and Henry was now a plumber and gas fitter. In the census of 31 March 1901 they were living at 9 Upper Coombe Street in Croydon with their six children, and Henry was now described as being a plumber and an employer working from home. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 they were still living at 9 Upper Coombe Street in Croydon, now with four of their children still at home, and Henry was still a plumber and an employer.

Henry died at the age of 58, his death being registered in Croydon registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1915. Nine years later Laura died at the age of 67, her death being registered in Croydon registration district during the 4th quarter of 1924.

 

 

Henry and Lauraís eldest child was Frederick Charles Streeter who was born at Croydon, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1881. In the census of 5 April 1891 Frederick, at the age of 10, was living with his parents at 56 St Peters Street in Croydon, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Frederick, now aged 20, was working as an apprentice electrician and living with his parents at 9 Upper Coombe Street in Croydon.

 

Henry and Lauraís second child was Amy Ellen Streeter who was born at Croydon, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1883. In the census of 5 April 1891 Amy, at the age of 8, was living with her parents at 56 St Peters Street in Croydon, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Amy, now aged 18, was living with her parents at 9 Upper Coombe Street in Croydon. In the census of 2 April 1911 Amy, at the age of 28, was working as a clerk and cashier in lady's underclothes and living with her parents at 9 Upper Coombe Street in Croydon. Amy never married. She died on 10 March 1955 at the age of about 72, and was buried in Croydon Cemetery in Mitcham Road in the same grave as her aunt Emily Muddle.

 

Henry and Lauraís third child was Beatrice Mary Streeter who was born at Croydon, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1885. In the census of 5 April 1891 Beatrice, at the age of 6, was living with her parents at 56 St Peters Street in Croydon, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Beatrice, now aged 16, was living with her parents at 9 Upper Coombe Street in Croydon. In the census of 2 April 1911 Beatrice, at the age of 26, was an unemployed shorthand typist and living with her parents at 9 Upper Coombe Street in Croydon. Beatrice never married. She died on 22 December 1949 at the age of 64, and she was buried in Croydon Cemetery in Mitcham Road in the same grave as her aunt Emily Muddle.

 

Henry and Lauraís fourth child was Ernest George Streeter who was born at Croydon, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1889. In the census of 5 April 1891 Ernest, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at 56 St Peters Street in Croydon. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Ernest, now aged 12, was living with his parents at 9 Upper Coombe Street in Croydon.

 

Henry and Lauraís fifth child was Herbert John Streeter who was born at Croydon, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1893. In the census of 31 March 1901 Herbert, at the age of 7, was living with his parents at 9 Upper Coombe Street in Croydon. The in the census of 2 April 1911 Herbert, now aged 17, was working as a law clerk and living with his parents at 9 Upper Coombe Street in Croydon.

 

Henry and Lauraís sixth child was Mabel Laura Streeter who was born at Croydon, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1897. In the census of 31 March 1901 Mabel, at the age of 4, was living with her parents at 9 Upper Coombe Street in Croydon. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Mabel, now aged 14, was going to school and living with her parents at 9 Upper Coombe Street in Croydon.

 

 

Charles and Mary Ellenís tenth child was Emily Muddle, also known as Emmie or Emma, who was born at Ditchling in Sussex on 24 August 1859, and baptised at St Margaret's Church in Ditchling on 4 December 1859. In the census of 7 April 1861 Emily, at the age of 1, was living with her parents in North Street at Ditchling. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Emily, now aged 11, was still living with her parents in North Street at Ditchling, and she was now going to school. In the census of 3 April 1881 Emily, at the age of 21, was living with her widowed father at North Street in Ditchling, where she was probably acting as his housekeeper. Emily's father died in 1885 and in the census of 5 April 1891 Emily, at the age of 31, was a live-in domestic servant to the family of widow Emily Tresiker at Audenby, Warham Road, Croydon, Surrey. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Emily, at the age of 41, was a live-in housemaid to retired solicitor and widower John Edwards at Allendale, Warham Road, Croydon. In the census of 2 April 1911 Emily, at the age of 51, was a live-in domestic servant to the family of company director John Middleton at The Elms, Morden Road, Morden near Croydon. Emily never married. She died at Croydon on 24 July 1916, at the age of 57, and she was buried in Croydon Cemetery in Mitcham Road on 27 July 1916, in a grave that was later used for two of the daughters of her sister Laura Streeter.

 

Charles and Mary Ellenís eleventh child was George Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 19 June 1861, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 12 February 1862. In the census of 2 April 1871 George, at the age of 9, was living with his parents in North Street at Ditchling, and he was going to school. George was a corn porter living at Croydon in Surrey when, at the age of about 18, he married 22-year-old Matilda Hickman at St John the Baptist Church in Croydon on 15 June 1879. Matilda was the daughter of Robert and Mary Ann Hickman, and she had been baptised at All Saints Church, Banstead, Surrey on 6 April 1856.

George and Matilda had seven children. Their first child was born at Mitcham in Surrey in 1880, and in the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at Tubbs Alley in Mitcham with their young daughter, and George was now a butcher. Their second child was born at Mitcham in 1885. They then moved to Carshalton in Surrey where their next five children were born between 1886 and 1895.

In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at Leavett's Cottage in Wrythe Lane at Carshalton with their then five children, and George was a gas stoker. They were still living there later that year when Matilda, at the age of 36, had a mental breakdown and on 22 December 1891 was admitted to Brookwood Asylum at Woking in Surrey on the authority of Justice of the Peace A Hyslop and the medical certificate signed by F S Moger. She was described as having attacks of mania that would last for two weeks. She stayed at Brookwood for four months until she was discharged on 29 April 1892, when she was described as having recovered from her illness.[23]

In the census of 31 March 1901 George and Matilda were living at Hope Cottage in Wrythe Lane with five of their children, and George was working as a general labourer. George was described as being a labourer when his three eldest children married between 1906 and 1910. In the census of 2 April 1911 George and Matilda were living at 7 Palmerston Road in Carshalton with two of their children, and George was working as a gardener's labourer.

George had been living at 7 Palmerston Road in Carshalton when he died at St Thomas' Hospital in Lambeth, London on 5 February 1915, at the age of 53, from asphixia, tetanic convulsion and injury to fingers trapped by a timber accident. An inquest into George's death was held by the Coroner for London on 9 February 1915. He was buried in Carshalton Churchyard. Eleven years later Matilda died in Epsom registration district on 26 September 1926, at the age of 70.

 

 

 

George and Matildaís eldest child was Charlotte Mary Muddle, known as Lottie, who was born at Mitcham in Surrey on 17 September 1880. In the census of 3 April 188 1 Charlotte, at the age of 7 months, was living with her parents at Tubbs Alley in Mitcham. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Charlotte now aged 10, was living with her parents at Leavettís Cottage in Wrythe Lane at Carshalton in Surrey. In late 1898 when she was about 18 years old Charlotte had an illegitimate daughter born in Epsom registration district, probably at her parentís home in Carshalton. This resulted in a paternity case at Croydon Court, which was reported in the Police Budget of 21 January 1899:

Boy and his Baby

At Croydon, George Vincent, 17, a millerís boy, of Mitcham, was summoned by Charlotte Muddle, a young domestic servant, also of Mitcham, to show cause &c.

The complainant stated that the child, a girl, was born on November 17, and the defendant was the father. She had known him for some years, and had ďwalked outĒ with him for some twelve months. She did not tell her mother of her condition until a month before the baby was born. Her mistress, however, knew of her condition, and she had also told the defendant.

Mr. Hood cross-examined the complainant as to her relations with other men, including her master. She admitted having been intimate with a man whom she named; but said that was three years ago. She had never told the defendant that her master was very fond of her and used to come into her bedroom. She never discussed her masterís affairs with Vincent. She did not go to the defendantís motherís house after October 13 because he refused to marry her, as he had promised, in September. They were to be married at a registry office. She could not say why marriage was not mentioned before September.

Mr. Judd (one of the magistrates) pointed out that they were not trying a breach of promise case.

The Magistrates eventually retired, and, on their return, the chairman said that, notwithstanding the several painful phases of the case, they were satisfied that the girl had established her claim on the defendant, who would pay 3s a week until the child was fifteen and 12s costs.

George didnít have to pay the 3s a week for too long, as his baby daughter died later that year, when less than a year old. In the census of 31 March 1901 Charlotte was living with her widowed uncle, Barnett Parfitt, at 20 Croydon Grove in Croydon. Also in the house were two male boarders, so itís probable that Charlotte was acting as housekeeper for her uncle and his boarders.

Barnett Parfitt, sometime called Barnard Parfitt, was the son of James and Harriot Parfitt and he had been born at Addington near Croydon in about 1831. In the 1841 census the Parfitt family were living almost next-door to the family of William and Mary Trunchion, which included daughters Mary Ann born in 1830 and Charlotte born in 1834. In 1851 Robert Hickman married Mary Ann Trunchion, these being the parents of Charlotte's mother, and in 1854 Barnett Parfitt married Charlotte Trunchion. Barnett's wife Charlotte died in early 1901 just before Charlotte Muddle was recorded as living with him in the 1901 census. The following year Barnett married widow Johanna Caroline Sophie Jenkins on 9 April 1902 and Charlotte Muddle and her sister Lily were two of the witnesses to the marriage. Johanna died in early 1911.

When she was 26 years old Charlotte married 25-year-old William Ashby at All Saints Church in Carshalton on 30 October 1906. William was then a gas fitter living at 36 Mill Lane in Carshalton, and Charlotte was living at 37 Mill Lane. William was the son of Joseph and Mary Ashby, and he had been born at Ramsgate in Kent on 3 April 1881. William and Charlotte initially lived in Croydon registration district where they had three children, all daughters, the first two were born in 1907 and 1909, In the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at 11 Stanley Road, Upper Wallington, Carshalton near Croydon with their two daughters; William was working as a gas inspector for a gas company and they had William's brother, 20-year-old Henry Ashby, living with them. Their third daughter was born in 1916 and died soon after birth. Then, probably in the 1920s, they moved to a semi-detached house in Broadstairs, Kent. During the Second World War they were evacuated to Caterham in Surrey. At the end of the war William and Charlotte and possibly their daughter Rosie returned to their home in Broadstairs, but their daughter Lily, who had a job in Croydon, went to live in Croydon.

William died at the age of 79, his death being registered in Thanet registration district, which includes Broadstairs, during the 3rd quarter of 1960. Thirteen years later Charlotte died in Thanet registration district on 2 March 1973, at the age of 92.

 

 

Charlotteís illegitimate daughter was Lilian Mary Muddle who was born on 17 November 1898 in Epsom registration district, probably at her maternal grandparentís home in Carshalton. Lilian died when only a few months old, her death being registered in Epsom registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1899.

 

William and Charlotteís eldest child (Charlotte's second) was Lily Elizabeth Ashby who was born in Croydon registration district in Surrey on 26 May 1907. In the census of 2 April 1911 Lily, at the age of 3, was living with her parents at 11 Stanley Road, Upper Wallington, Carshalton near Croydon. Lily moved to Broadstairs in Kent with her parents and then during the Second World War they were all evacuated to Caterham in Surrey. While living in Caterham Lily got a job in Croydon and after the war when the rest of the family returned to Broadstairs Lily went to live in Croydon. Then when she retired Lily went to live with her widowed mother in Broadstairs and continued to live in the family house after her mother's death in 1973. Lily never married. She died in Broadstairs Hospital, at the age of 88, her death being registered during November 1995, when her first name was recorded as Lilian.

 

William and Charlotteís second child (Charlotte's third) was Charlotte Rose Ashby, known as Rosie, whose birth was registered in Croydon registration district in Surrey during the 1st quarter of 1909. In the census of 2 April 1911 Rosie, at the age of 2, was living with her parents at 11 Stanley Road, Upper Wallington, Carshalton near Croydon. Rosie moved to Broadstairs in Kent with her parents and then during the Second World War they were all evacuated to Caterham in Surrey, returning to Broadstairs after the war. Rosie never married. She died at the age of 48, her death being registered in Bournemouth registration district in Dorset during the 2nd quarter of 1957.

 

William and Charlotteís third child (Charlotte's fourth) was Violet H Ashby whose birth was registered in Croydon registration district in Surrey during the 1st quarter of 1916. Violet died soon after birth, her death being registered in Croydon registration district during the 1st quarter of 1916.

 

 

George and Matildaís second child was Albert Charles Muddle who was born at Beddington Corner in Mitcham, Surreyon 15 March 1885. In the census of 5 April 1891 Albert, at the age of 6, was living with his parents at Leavett's Cottage in Wrythe Lane at Carshalton in Surrey. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Albert, now aged 16, was working as an errand boy and living with his parents at Hope Cottage in Wrythe Lane.

 When he was 24 years old Albert married 23-year-old Mary Broadhurst at All Saints Church in Carshalton on 4 October 1909. They were both then living at 37 Mill Lane in Carshalton, and Albert was a grocer's assistant. Mary was the daughter of shepherd Thomas Broadhurst and his wife Sarah; she was one of twin girls born at Hill Barn, Farmington, Gloucestershire on 12 January 1886. Albert and Mary had eight children born in Carshalton between 1910 and 1930. In the census of 2 April 1911 Albert and Mary, with their then only child, were living at 1 Clara Villas, West Street, Carshalton, and Albert was continuing to work as a grocer's assistant.

 

 

During the First World War Albert served as Private 40282 in the South Wales Borderers and also as Private 57455 in the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. He was at the Battle of the Somme and for his service during the war he was awarded two campaign medals; the Victory Medal and the British War Medal.[24] After the war Albert worked for a corn and seed merchant in Carshalton before, in the early 1920s, he became secretary of the Carshalton Ex-Servicemenís Housing and Provident Society, which subsequently developed into the Nibloc Syndicate Ltd., that built much housing in Carshalton; he held this position until his death. Albert was active in ex-servicemenís organisations, particularly the British Legion. He was also involved in the development of Carshalton Athletic Football Club between the two world wars, and was a member of the Freemasons, being a Brother of Ember Lodge, No. 2540, Surbiton, and a Companion of Ember Chapter.

In 1929 they moved from 1 Clara Villas, West Street, Carshalton to Beau Monde, Willis Avenue, Banstead Road, Carshalton, where they were listed as still living in the London Telephone Directory of 1939 and 1953. They had a holiday home, also called Beau Monde, at Elmer Sands, Middleton-on-Sea near Bognor Regis on the Sussex coast.

When Mary's father died the 6 October 1934 edition of The Cheltenham Chronicle and Gloucestershire Graphic reported that Mr & Mrs Muddle were two of the mourners at the funeral of 82-year-old Thomas Broadhurst of Windrush, that took place at St Lawrence's Church, Wyck Rissington.

Albert was described as a contractor when he was one of the two executors who had the will of Amos Dexter proved in 1937. Amos Dexter described himself as a carter contractor in the 1911 census and was living at Beddington in Surrey when he died in late 1936, so he was probably a business associate and possible friend of Albert.

 

 

Albert died in the War Memorial Hospital in Carshalton on 18 October 1951, at the age of 66, from acute myocoiditis, peritonitis and acute appendicitis. Albertís funeral was at Croydon Crematorium on 24 October 1951. His obituary was published in the Wallington & Carshalton Herald on 26 October 1951:

EX-SERVICE MEN LOSE A FRIEND

Mr. Albert Muddle Dies After Operation

By the death of Mr. Albert Charles Muddle, of Wallis-avenue, which took place in Carshalton War Memorial Hospital on Thursday last, the district loses an active and useful citizen and one who in an unostentatious way has been connected with many local organisations.

After an apparently successful internal operation about three weeks ago, complications supervened, and death followed.

Mr. Muddle was born in Wallington 66 years ago, the son of Mr. George Henry Muddle, a master butcher, who soon moved to Carshalton. Educated mainly at Mitcham, he began his business career in the grocery trade. On returning from military service in the Kaiser War with the South Wales Borderers, Mr. Muddle entered the employment of Messrs. R. E. Johnson and Son, corn and seed merchants, of High-street and Pound-street.

WORKED FOR EX-SERVICEMEN.

But in the early 20ís his lifeís work may be said to have commenced. His genius for figures and flair for reading legal enactments (of which there were many in the post-war period) fitted him peculiarly for the position of secretary of the Carshalton Ex-Servicemenís Housing and Provident Society, which subsequently developed into the Nibloc Syndicate Ltd., and this position he held until he died.

Starting with a couple of houses on Wrythe Green, which were built with money advanced by County Cllr. E. H. Rickards, the society grew apace. It developed Colston-avenue, which had recently been cut through from Westmead-road to West-street, built many houses in West-street, and developed the Byron Orchard Estate. Indeed the story of the growth of the district between the two wars is closely identified with that of Nibloc.

In Spite of the demands which a growing new business made on his time and energies, Mr. Muddle found time to take an active part in other concerns, but they were almost all primarily linked with the ex-Service movement. There was the project of a new Ex-Service Club in West-street, which was built by money from the Canteen (Byng) Fund, and of which Mr. Muddle had been treasurer since its inception.

HELPED RE-FORM THE ďROBINSĒ.

Then there was the reformation of Carshalton Athletic Football Club as a senior team. This proved a long and costly process and occupied the whole of the period between the two world wars, the second of which almost defeated local footballers of this cherished ambition. Mr. Muddle was treasurer throughout the whole of the period and was one of those who put quite a lot of money as well as of effort into the project.

But the British Legion was the ex-Service movement that was Mr. Muddleís principal concern. Here again he took up the treasurership, as well as that of the United Services Fund Committee, which was the organisation for the relief of war distress, and which, on the winding-up of the U.S.F., carried on as the Benevolent Committee of the Legion.

Mrí Muddle had other activities too, these including the supervision of the finances of Mill-lane Mission and the large slate club which is one of the missionís biggest jobs. He had also been a member for many years of the local Lodge of Freemasons.

He is survived by a widow (formerly Miss Mary Broadhurst, of Gloucester) and a family of three sons and five daughters, all of whom are married.

The funeral, which took place at Croydon Crematorium, Mitcham-road, on Wednesday afternoon, will be reported in our next issue.

After Albert's death Mary went to live with the family of her daughter Eva Bruce in Erskine Road, Sutton. Then ten years after Albert's death Mary died in the War Memorial Hospital in Carshalton on 3 September 1961, at the age of 75.

 

 

 

Albert and Maryís eldest child was Albert George Robert Muddle, known as Albi by the family and Bert by friends and colleagues, who was born at Carshalton in Surrey on 9 February 1910. In the census of 2 April 1911 Albert, at the age of 1, was living with his parents at 1 Clara Villas, West Street, Carshalton.

When he was 21 years old Albert married 22-year-old Doris Winifred Allbone at All Saints Church in Carshalton on 12 December 1931. Albert was then a carpenter living with his parents at Beau Monde, Willis Avenue, Banstead Road, Carshalton, and Doris, who had been born on 8 June 1909, was a punnett maker living at 160 Green Wrythe Lane, Carshalton. They had two children; the first was born in Epsom registration district during 1933, and the second in Carshalton, Surrey during 1944

It was in about the mid-1930s that Albert had in an accident in which his entire left arm was very badly lacerated, this took a long time to heal and he couldn't use the arm for quite some time, which resulted in him not being fit enough to serve in the armed forces during the Second World War.

By 1947 Albert was a civil servant working in Uganda, when his wife and two children, who had been living at Seabreeze, Manor Lane, Selsey, sailed 1st class on the Dominion Monarch of the Shaw Savill & Albion Line from London on 31 May 1947 bound for Mombassa to join him in Uganda.[25] Then seventeen months later all four of them sailed 1st class on the Mantola of the British India Steam Navigation Line from Mombassa and arrived at Plymouth on 22 October 1948. On the passenger list Albert was described as a civil servant and Doris as a housewife, and it stated that they would be living at 2 Orchard Land Cottage in Burstall near Ipswich.[26] After five months in England they all sailed tourist class on the Llangibby Castle of the Union Castle Line from London on 8 April 1949 bound for Mombassa on their way back to Uganda. On this passenger list Albert stated that he was a supervisor.[27] Then after three years in Uganda Albert, Doris and their daughter sailed 1st class on the Rhodesia Castle of the Union Castle Line from Mombasa and arrived at London on 2 July 1952. On the passenger list Albert was described as a civil servant and Doris as a housewife, and it stated that they would again be living at 2 Orchard Land Cottage in Burstall near Ipswich.[28] Their son was now 19 years old and working for the Post & Telecommunications Administration, Entebbe, Uganda.

In late 1952 or early 1953 Albert, Doris and their daughter flew back to Uganda on a BOAC Comet, the first British jet airliner that had entered service in mid-1952. Then after two years in Uganda they sailed 1st class on the Boschfontein of the Holland Afrika Line from Mombasa to arrive at Southampton on 13 March 1955. On the passenger list Albert was again described as a civil servant and it stated that they would this time be living at 8a Willis Avenue in Sutton, Surrey.[29] After 3Ĺ months in England the three of them sailed 1st class on the Warwick Castle of the Union Castle Line from London on 30 June 1955 bound for Mombasa on their way to Uganda. On the passenger list Albert was described as a manager and civil servant.[30] After just under three years in Uganda Albert, Doris and their daughter sailed cabin class on the Rhodesia Castle of the Union Castle Line from Mombasa and arrived at London on 19 April 1958. On the passenger list Albert was described as a civil servant and it stated that they would be living at Rectory Cottage in Woodmancote near Henfield, Sussex.[31] After five months in England the three of them sailed tourist class on the Warwick Castle of the Union Castle Line from London on 16 September 1958 bound for Mombasa on their way to Uganda. On the passenger list Albert was still described as a civil servant.[32] This was their last tour in Uganda and they returned to England in about 1961.

Albert was a civil engineer and his job title in the Ugandan colonial administration was Superintendent of Works. On each tour of duty he was posted to different places 'up country' to towns such as Jinja, Tororo and Sorroti where he was overseeing large teams of African and Asian workers building new towns, government offices and roads. Then he was in Entebbe where he was in charge of the building of Entebbe Airport, and finally on the last two tours he was in the capital Kampala. In 1953 the Governor of Kampala, Sir Andrew Cohen, had Albert wallpaper rooms in Government House that the Queen Mother and Princess Margaret were to use on their visit to Uganda during July 1953, as Albert was the only person in the country who knew how to hang wallpaper.

On their final return to England in about 1961 Albert retired and they lived at Milton Avenue, Sutton, Surrey then Wittering, Sussex and then Upper Beeding, Sussex. In 1967 they were living at Great Stukeley Stores, 25 Church Road, Great Stukeley, Huntingdon, where they were the proprietors of this shop for a few years. In late 1979 or early 1980 they moved to Kings Lynn in Norfolk where they lived at 55 Goodwins Road. Doris died at Kings Lynn on 6 November 1994, at the age of 85. Then six years later Albert died at Kings Lynn on 22 May 2000, at the age of 90.

 

 

Albert and Maryís second child was Daisy Ellen Muddle who was born at Carshalton in Surrey on 23 November 1911. When she was 22 years old Daisy married 40-year-old John Albert C Nash, known as Jack, in Carshalton during the 3rd quarter of 1934. Jack was the son of Charles and Mary Nash, and he had been born at Carshalton in Surrey on 3 June 1894. Jack and Daisy had one child born in 1946. When her father died in 1951 Daisy was living at 28 Oaks Way, Carshalton, Surrey. Jack died at the age of 81, his death being registered in Hove registration district in Sussex during the 1st quarter of 1976. Thirty-three years later Daisy died on 1 July 2009, at the age of 97, and she was cremated at the North East Surrey Crematorium in Morden on 16 July 2009.

 

 

Albert and Maryís third child was George Henry Muddle who was born at Carshalton in Surrey on 23 September 1913. George attended Carshalton Council Boys' School in Camden Road, which he left on 21 December 1927, at the age of 14. On leaving his headmaster J Edgar Bradley gave him a reference that he could show to prospective employers that as well as the standard statements that would have been given about any good pupil said that George was especially good at arithmetic, penmanship and woodwork, and that he was well-spoken, quiet-mannered, painstaking lad whom he strongly recommended.

 

 

When he was 22 years old George married 22-year-old Constance Edith Newen, known as Connie, at Holy Trinity Church in Wallington, Surrey on 14 December 1935, followed by a reception at the Guides' Hall, Wallington Green. George was then a plumber living with his parents at Beau Monde, Willis Avenue, Carshalton, and Constance was living with her parents at 38 Manor Road, Wallington. Constance was the daughter of John Conrad and Florence Ada Newen and she had been born in Grimsby registration district, Lincolnshire on 20 March 1913. Her surname was originally Neuendorff, but the family changed the name to Newen at the time of the First World War, both her parents' families being of German origin.

During the Second World War George was in the REME (Royal Electrical & Mechanical Engineers) and he served in the Gold Coast, West Africa where he maintained and repaired motorcycles. After the war George returned to being a plumber and lived with Connie at 21 Paget Avenue in Sutton, Surrey. They had one child, a daughter, born in 1947.

 

 

George continued to work as a plumber until in 1957 they moved to Burgess Hill in Sussex, where they had a newsagents and sweet shop that Connie ran for a few months before George gave up being a plumber and became a shop proprietor. It was the changes they would have to make with the introduction of Value Added Tax in 1983 that made them decide to retire and sell their home and shop in Burgess Hill and move to the Sussex coast at Ferring near Worthing.

Constance died at her home, 8 Highdown Close, Ferring on 21 October 1988, at the age of 75. Eight months later George was still living at 8 Highdown Close when he died in Worthing Hospital on 19 June 1989, at the age of 75, from a stroke. He was cremated at Worthing Crematorium on 26 June 1989.

 

 

Albert and Maryís fourth child was Eva May Muddle who was born at Carshalton in Surrey on 21 September 1915. When she was about 18 years old Eva married 19-year-old Herbert E Bruce, known as Bert, in Epsom registration district during the 4th quarter of 1933. Herbert's birth had been registered in Epsom registration district in Surrey during the 1st quarter of 1914. Bert and Eva had two children; the first born in Epsom registration district in 1934 and the second in Mid-East Surrey registration district in 1937. They were living in Erskine Road, Sutton when they had Eva's widowed mother living with them in the late 1950s until her death in 1961. Bert died at the age of 55, his death being registered in Sutton registration district in Surrey during the 1st quarter of 1969. Forty years later Eva died on 27 February 2009, at the age of 93.

 

Albert and Maryís fifth child was Muriel Muddle who was born at Carshalton in Surrey on 3 November 1918. Murial attended Carshalton West School and then worked as a shorthand typist. Then, when she was 21 years old, Muriel married 22-year-old George William Wright at Ruskin Road Methodist Church in Carshalton, Surrey on 9 May 1940. George was the son of Edmund and Florence Wright and he had been born at Balham in London on 29 April 1918.

George had joined the Territorial Army before the outbreak of the Second World War and reported for active service on 1 September 1939, two days before the declaration of war. He joined the 140 London Field Ambulance of the Royal Army Medical Corps and served, unarmed, throughout the war as a Nursing Officer. He was on the front line for the invasion of Sicily and Italy and was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field. Muriel spent the war working for the Ministry of Food.

After the war, George took advantage of the educational opportunities available for ex-servicemen and trained as a teacher. He then had a long, successful career teaching Physics and Mathematics, and became the Head of Science at Wilson's School on the Roundshaw estate in Wallington, Surrey. He played football as a young man and was a long standing member of Surrey Grove Cricket Club at Poulter Park, alongside his brother-in-law Fred Muddle.

George and Muriel had two children, both daughters; the first born in Mid-East Surrey registration district in 1948 and the second in North-East Surrey registration district in 1951. After bringing up her daughters, Muriel went into School Administration and spent a number of years as the School Secretary at Nonsuch Grammar School for Girls in Cheam.

George and Muriel lived for some 50 years in Carshalton Beeches, very close to Muriel's childhood home at Beau Monde, Willis Avenue, Banstead Road, Carshalton, before moving to a retirement property near to their two daughters. Then in about October 2010 they went to live with their daughter Rosemary. George died at Felbridge on 23 April 2011, at the age of 92, just a few days short of his 93rd birthday and their 71st Wedding Anniversary. His funeral was at the Surrey & Sussex Crematorium, Balcombe Road, Crawley on 12 May 2011. Muriel continued to live with her daughter Rosemary, dying at her daughter's home on 21 October 2012, at the age of 93. Her funeral was on 1 November 2012 with a church service at St John Church in Felbridge.

 

 

Albert and Maryís sixth child was Frederick Charles Muddle, known as Fred, who was born at Carshalton in Surrey on 31 October 1920. During the Second World War Fred served in the Royal Navy. He was called-up in 1941 and trained to be a Gunner on armed merchant ships. He first served on a coaster sailing between England and Ireland before being transferred to the larger SS Baron Elphinstone at Avonmouth on 23 March 1942, sailing to the Mediterranean then through the Suez Canal to East Africa. She then sailed from LourenÁo Marques, Mozambique on 17 September 1942 and stopped off at Trinidad where Fred transferred to the Canadian ship SS Elgin and sailed up to Canada. The Baron Elphinstone continued her voyage to arrive at New York on 17 November 1942 where Fred was shown on the crew list as a Deckhand but crossed out with the note that he had transferred to another ship at Trinidad.[33]

The USA immigration authorities recorded Fred as a Gunner on the crew list of the Elgin when she arrived at Oswego, on the Lake Ontario Coast of New York State on 1 October 1943 from Port Alfred, Quebec, Canada. Fred had joined this voyage at Montreal on 12 June 1943 and had been a member of the crew on the last voyage of the Elgin to the USA. On the crew list Fred was described as being 5ft 8ins tall and weighing 143lbs.[34] When the ports of the Great Lakes froze up during the winter the Elgin stop sailing and Fred had six weeks ashore before sailing on a converted aircraft carrier back to England. There he joined the SS Antenor, which was a Blue Funnel liner that had become a troop carrier, and while Fred served on her she carried American troops across the English Channel as part of the 1944 invasion of Normandy and also took troops to Africa. Fred was demobbed in 1946 when the Antenor returned to commercial service.

 

 

When he was 26 years old Fred married 23-year-old Margaret Florence Fisher, known as Peggy, at Corpus Christi Roman Catholic Church, Brixton Hill, Brixton, London SW2 on 13 April 1947. Fred was then a cellulose sprayer living at 8a Willis Avenue in Sutton, and Peggy was a chemist shop assistant living at 18 Crownstone Court, London SW2. Peggy was the daughter of Stanley Clowes and Alice Fisher, and she had been born in Handsworth, Birmingham on 20 June 1923. Fred and Peggy first lived with Fred's parents at Beau Monde in Willis Road and then in 1952 they moved to Milton Close in Sutton. They adopted two children in the late 1950s / early 1960s.

After his discharge from the Royal Navy Fred had returned to his old job as a coach paint sprayer and remained in that occupation until his retirement. He was working for Lucas, whose back entrance was in New Park Road, Brixton, London SW2 so their front entrance was probably on Brixton Hill, when he met Peggy working in her father's chemist shop on Brixton Hill. Fred continued to work for Lucas when they moved to Gaskarth Road in Balham, London SW12 and then later worked at Robson Engineers at Gypsy Hill.

Cricket was a major part of Fred's life, he played for Surrey Grove Cricket Club at Poulter Park, as did his brother-in-law George Wright and his lifelong friend Dennis Butler. Peggy died in Atkinson Moreley Hospital, Wimbledon, London SW20 on 25 March 1994, at the age of 70.

 

 

Albert and Maryís seventh child was Jean Muddle who was born at Carshalton in Surrey on 18 August 1922. The day before her 24th birthday Jean married 42-year-old divorcee Edward Henry Charles Learwood, known as Ted at the Methodist Church, Ruskin Road, Carshalton on 17 August 1946. Edward was the son of Edward Henry John Learwood and his wife Kate; he had been born at Hammersmith in Fulham registration district, London on 8 February 1904, and his birth registered with the name Edward Charles Henry Learwood. Edward's first marriage had been to Grace Elizabeth Reeves and they had four children before their marriage ended in divorce.

Edward and Jean moved into 17 St Normans Way, East Ewell, Surrey in about 1947 and their only child, a son, was born there in 1950. When they married Edward was a manager at an engineering works and then when he died at his home, 17 St Normans Way, on 14 May 1958, at the age of 54, he was a manager at a light engineering works. After Edward's death Jean had a number of different jobs, starting with bar work, then working at a confectioners and tobacconists, and finally finishing work in her 79th year at a small cash and carry warehouse in the wines, spirits and tobacco department. Fifty-one years after Edward's death Jean was still living at 17 St Normans Way when she died there on 4 March 2009, at the age of 86.

 

 

Albert and Maryís eighth child was Joyce Mary Muddle who was born at Carshalton in Surrey on 27 February 1930. When she was 21 years old Joyce married 21-year-old Roy Vincent Chapman at the Methodist Church, Ruskin Road, Carshalton on 8 September 1951. Roy had been born in Camberwell registration district in Surrey on 9 March 1930. Roy and Joyce had two children born in North-East Surrey registration district in 1953 and 1954.

 

 

 

George and Matildaís third child was Laura Lily Muddle, known as Lily, who was born at Carshalton in Surrey on 31 May 1886. In the census of 5 April 1891 Lily, at the age of 4, was living with her parents at Leavett's Cottage in Wrythe Lane at Carshalton. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Lily, now aged 14, was a live-in housemaid to the family of stockbroker Percy Smith at Fernside, Brighton Road, Sutton, Surrey.

When she was 23 years old Lily married 23-year-old Harry Dixon at All Saints Church in Carshalton on 12 March 1910. Harry was then a cab driver living at 45 Beulah Road, Sutton, and Lily was living at Mill Lane in Carshalton. Harry was the son of John and Jane Dixon; he had been born at Cuddington in Surrey and his birth registered during the 2nd quarter of 1886.

In the census of 2 April 1911 Harry and Lily were living at 13 Montague Terrace, Collingwood Road, Sutton and Harry was working as a cab driver. They had six children; the first three born in Epsom registration district between 1911, 1913 and 1915; the fourth born in Wandsworth registration district in 1916; and the fifth and sixth in Croydon registration district in 1917 and 1918. They were living at 22 Bridport Road in Thornton Heath just to the north of Croydon when their third child died in a house fire on 29 December 1917, when she was not quite 3 years old.

They continued to live at Thornton Heath. Harry died at the age of 76, his death being registered in Croydon registration district during the 1st quarter of 1963. Eleven years later Lily died in Croydon registration district on 21 January 1974, at the age of 87.

 

 

Harry and Lilyís eldest child was Lily R Dixon whose birth was registered in Epsom registration district in Surrey during the 4th quarter of 1911.

 

Harry and Lilyís second child was Ellen K Dixon whose birth was registered in Epsom registration district in Surrey during the 3rd quarter of 1913.

 

Harry and Lilyís third child was Frances May Dixon, known as May, whose birth was registered in Epsom registration district in Surrey during the 1st quarter of 1915. May died in a house fire in Croydon registration district on 29 December 1917, when she was not quite 3 years old. She was buried in grave 26252 of Queen's Road Cemetery in Croydon on 2 January 1918.

 

 

Harry and Lilyís fourth child was Jenny Violet Dixon, known as Violet, whose birth was registered in Wandsworth registration district in London during the 2nd quarter of 1916.

 

Harry and Lilyís fifth child was Harry J Dixon whose birth was registered in Croydon registration district in Surrey during the 3rd quarter of 1917.

 

Harry and Lilyís sixth child was Arthur E Dixon whose birth was registered in Croydon registration district in Surrey during the 4th quarter of 1918.

 

 

George and Matildaís fourth child was George Henry Muddle who was born Carshalton in Surrey on 14 February 1889. In the census of 5 April 1891 George, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at Leavett's Cottage in Wrythe Lane, Carshalton. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 George, now aged 12, was living with his parents at Hope Cottage in Wrythe Lane. In the census of 2 April 1911 George, at the age of 22 was working as a carpenter for a builder and living with his parents at 7 Palmerston Road in Carshalton. George became a follower of the Plymouth Brethren, a conservative evangelical Christian movement, and his three future wives were also followers.

When he was 25 years old George married 26-year-old Rose Inchcomb at the Plymouth Brethren Meeting House of West Street Hall in Carshalton during the 3rd quarter of 1914. Rose was the daughter of Charles and Jane Inchcomb; she had been born in Clapham in London and her birth registered during the 4th quarter of 1887. George and Rose didn't have any children. Rose died of heart failure in Croydon registration district in Surrey on 5 December 1920, at the age of 33. She was buried in grave 342C of Bandon Hill Cemetery at Wallington in Surrey on 9 December 1920.

Two years later George, at the age of 34, married 33-year-old Emily Cave at the Plymouth Brethren Meeting House of West Street Hall in Carshalton during the 2nd quarter of 1923. They had one child born in Croydon registration district during 1930. Emily died in Worthing registration district in Sussex on 14 June 1969, at the age of 79, and she was buried in Littlehampton Cemetery.

Four years later George, at the age of 84, married 73-year-old spinster Muriel Murliss Clarke at the Plymouth Brethren Meeting House of West Street Hall in Carshalton during the 1st quarter of 1973. Muriel had been born at Sutton in Surrey on 18 March 1900. Eight years later George died suddenly at home in Rustington near Littlehampton in Sussex on 2 August 1981, at the age of 92. He was buried with his first wife in Bandon Hill Cemetery at Wallington in London. Then the following year Muriel had been living at 9 Parry Drive in Rustington when she died in Littlehampton Hospital on 5 January 1982, at the age of 81, from heart failure. Muriel was buried with George and Rose in Bandon Hill Cemetery at Wallington in London. Muriel's death certificate described her as the widow of George Henry Muddle a builder. George had originally been a cabinet maker but later became a foreman builder for a house building company.

 

 

George and Matildaís fifth child was Mary Ellen Muddle, known as Nellie, who was born at Carshalton in Surrey on 19 November 1890. In the census of 5 April 1891 Nellie, at the age of 4 months, was living with her parents at Leavett's Cottage in Wrythe Lane at Carshalton. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Nellie, now aged 10, was living with her parents at Hope Cottage in Wrythe Lane.

Later Nellie worked for her widowed uncle Barnett Parfitt at 20 Croydon Grove in Croydon, Surrey, probably either taking over as his housekeeper from her elder sister Charlotte when she married in 1906, or after Barnett's second wife died in early 1911. In the census of 2 April 1911 Nellie, at the age of 20, was a live-in general domestic servant to 79-year-old widower Barnett Parfitt at 20 Croydon Grove in Croydon. When Barnett died on 28 July 1917, at the age of 86, Nellie was present at his death at 20 Croydon Grove and registered his death two days later. Barnett left Nellie his house at 20 Croydon Grove.

Then two years later when she was 28 years old Nellie married 28-year-old Arthur Williamson at Christ Church in Croydon on 26 July 1919. Arthur was then a cashier living at 23 Thorp Road in Wallington, and Nellie was living at 20 Croydon Grove in Croydon. Arthur was the son of Alfred and Jane Sophia Williamson, and his birth had been registered in Chorlton registration district near Manchester during the 1st quarter of 1891. Nellie met Arthur at the end of the First World War when he was stationed in the Croydon area. They lived at Croydon where they had one child, a son, born in 1921.

Arthur died at Croydon on 26 January 1947, at the age of 56. Thirty years later Nellie died at the age of 86, her death being registered in Croydon registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1977.

 

 

George and Matildaís sixth child was Robert Barnett Muddle who was born at Carshalton in Surrey, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1893. In the census of 31 March 1901 Robert, at the age of 8, was living with his parents at Hope Cottage in Wrythe Lane at Carshalton. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Robert, now aged 18, was working as a baker's roundsman and lodging with baker George Gater at 1 York Road in Croydon, Surrey.

When he was 23 years old Robert married Elizabeth Alice Carter, who was about 22 years old, in Croydon registration district in Surrey during the 4th quarter of 1916. Elizabeth had been born in Wandsworth registration district in London on 20 October 1894. Robert and Elizabeth had two children born in Croydon registration district in 1929 and 1930.

Robert died in Croydon registration district on 25 February 1948, at the age of 55, and he was buried in Addington Churchyard near Croydon. Forty years later Elizabeth died at the age of 93, her death being registered in Bromley registration district in London during March 1988.

 

 

George and Matildaís seventh child was Rose Muddle who was born at Carshalton in Surrey on 14 January 1895. In the census of 31 March 1901 Rose, at the age of 6, was living with her parents at Hope Cottage in Wrythe Lane, Carshalton. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Rose, now aged 16, was not working and living with his parents at 7 Palmerston Road in Carshalton. Rose never married. She died at the age of 79, her death being registered in Croydon registration district in Surrey during the 3rd quarter of 1974.

 

 

 

Charles and Mary Ellenís twelfth child was Minnie Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 2 August 1863, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 4 October 1863. In the census of 2 April 1871 Minnie, at the age of 7, was living with her parents in North Street at Ditchling, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Minnie, now aged 17, was a live-in housemaid for widowed solicitor John Allan Edwards at Allen Dale, Wareham Road, Croydon, Surrey.

When she was 26 years old Minnie married 29-year-old James Hews at Holy Trinity Church in Worthing on 25 December 1889. They were both then living in Holy Trinity Parish in Worthing and James was a coal merchant. James was the son of James and Ellen Hews, he had been born at Kirdford in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St John the Baptist in Kirdford on 12 February 1860. James and Minnie had one child, a son, born at Worthing in 1890. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at 5 Howard Street, Broadwater, Worthing with their young son, and James was still a coal merchant. The following year Minnie died in East Preston registration district, which includes Broadwater, on 19 May 1892, at the age of 28.

Seven years later James, at the age of 39, married 31-year-old Harriet Emily Trimm in East Preston registration district during the 4th quarter of 1899. Harriet was the daughter of Aine and Sarah Trimm, she had been born at Moor Crichel in Dorset and baptised at the Parish Church of St Mary in Moor Crichel on 29 November 1868. James and Harriet had three children; the first, a son, born at Worthing in 1900. In the census of 31 March 1901 they were living at 5 Howard Street with their young son and James' son from his first marriage, and James was a coal merchant working on his own account. Their other two children were born at Worthing in 1902 and 1903.

James died at the age of 50, his death being registered in East Preston registration district during the 1st quarter of 1910. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Harriet and her three children were living at Crichel, Browning Road, Worthing; Harriet was now living on private means and she had her niece, 18-year-old Edith Greenfield, who was a general domestic servant, living with her. Harriet died at the age of 89, her death being registered in Worthing registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1958.

 

 

 

James and Minnieís only child was James Hews who was born at Worthing in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1890. In the census of 5 April 1891 James, at the age of 5 months, was living with his parents at 5 Howard Street, Broadwater, Worthing. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 James, now aged 10, was living with his father and stepmother at 5 Howard Street.

 

James and Harrietís eldest child (Jamesí second) was Douglas Aine Hews who was born at Worthing in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1900. In the census of 31 March 1901 Douglas, at the age of 8 months, was living with his parents at 5 Howard Street, Broadwater, Worthing. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Douglas, now aged 10, was going to school and living with his widowed mother at Crichel, Browning Road, Worthing.

 

James and Harrietís second child (James' third) was Ruby Hews who was born at Worthing in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1902. In the census of 2 April 1911 Ruby, at the age of 9, was going to school and living with her widowed mother at Crichel, Browning Road, Worthing.

 

James and Harrietís third child (James' fourth) was Edgar Frank Hews who was born at Worthing in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1903. In the census of 2 April 1911 Edgar, at the age of 7, was going to school and living with his widowed mother at Crichel, Browning Road, Worthing.

 

 

Charles and Mary Ellenís thirteenth child was Albert Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 24 January 1867, and baptised at St Margaretís Church in Ditchling on 10 July 1867. In the census of 2 April 1871 Albert, at the age of 4, was living with his parents in North Street at Ditchling, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Albert, now aged 14, was living with his widowed father at North Street in Ditchling, and he was described as being a shop boy, presumably he was working in his fatherís butcherís shop. In the census of 5 April 1891 Albert, at the age of 24, was a police constable lodging with the family of fellow police constable James Maskell at 36 Belgrave Terrace in Brighton. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Albert, at the age of 34, was a live-in lunatic attendant at St George the Martyr Southwark Workhouse, Mint Street, Borough, London.

When he was 35 years old Albert married 42-year-old spinster Emily Willsmore, at St John's Church at East Dulwich in the Parish of Camberwell, London, on 1 October 1902. They were both then living at the Constance Road Workhouse in East Dulwich, where Albert was the Poor Law Labour Master. Emily was the daughter of Joseph and Mary Ann Willsmore; she had been born at Halstead in Essex and her birth registered during the 1st quarter of 1860. Albert and Emily didn't have any children.

They later moved to Bath in Somerset and Albert became the publican at the Edinburgh Arms own by the Bath Brewery; the 27 February 1908 edition of The Bath Chronicle reporting that on 21 February 1908 the Bath Licensing Justices approved the transfer of the license of the Edinburgh Arms from J T Cawdrin to Albert Muddle. Then eighteen months later the 19 August 1909 edition of The Bath Chronicle reported that on 13 August 1909 the Bath Licensing Justices approved the transfer of the license of the Edinburgh Arms from Albert Muddle to Jabez Henry Dainton.

Albert then became publican at the Manvers Arms in Bath and the 30 September 1909 edition of The Bath Chronicle reported that on 25 September 1909 Albert Spanswick was before Bath Magistrates charged with being disorderly on licensed premises and Albert Muddle, the licensee, gave evidence as to his disorderly behaviour resulting in him being fined 13s with 7s costs. Then the 27 January 1910 edition of The Bath Chronicle recorded that Albert Muddle, licensee of the Manvers Arms in Bath, was a witness when Arthur Flower was before the Bath Magistrates charged with refusing to quit the licensed premises known as the Manvers Arms on Saturday 22 January when ordered to do so by the licensee, and being drunk and disorderly in Newark Street. Albert stated that the prisoner came to his house on Saturday evening under the influence of liquor, so he refused to serve him and asked him to leave, which he refused to do. The police were called and the prisoner taken into custody. Arthur Flower was fined 10s or seven days in goal for each offence.

The 1911 edition of the Post Office Bath Directory listed Albert Muddle as the publican at the Manvers Arms, 10 Philip Street, Bath. But this must have been based on 1910 information and right at the end of their time in Bath before they moved the 15 miles east to Calne in Wiltshire, because in the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at 33 The Green in Calne, which was a beershop where Albert was the managing publican and Emily was assisting him in the business. The 1911 and 1915 editions of Kelly's Directory of Wiltshire have Albert Muddle listed as a beer retailer at 33 The Green in Calne. Then the 1917 edition of the North Wilts and District Directory listed A Muddle as living at The Green in Calne, and the 1920 edition of the Kelly's Wiltshire Directory listed Albert Muddle as a beer retailer at 33 The Green in Calne.

Albert died at the age of 71, his death being registered in Devizes registration district in Wiltshire during the 1st quarter of 1938. A few months later Emily died at the age of 78, her death being registered in Chippenham registration district in Wiltshire during the 3rd quarter of 1938.

 

 

Thomas and Susanís fourth child was Susan Muddle who was born at Ditchling on 11 June 1828, and baptised at St Margaret's Church in Ditchling on 22 August 1828. In the census of 6 June 1841 Susan, at the age of 12, was living with her grandmother, Sarah Muddle, who was an 80-year-old widow, in part of the house owned by her father on the North Side of East End Lane in Ditchling. Her parents lived in the other part of the house and Susan was probably living with her grandmother so that she could help her with her housework.

In the census of 30 March 1851 Susan, at the age of 22, was living with her parents at their home in East End Lane at Ditchling. Then three days later, at the age of 22, Susan married widower George Kemp at St Pancras Parish Church, Euston Road, St Pancras, Middlesex, on 2 April 1851. George was then a cooper living in Aldenham Street in St Pancras, and Susan was living at Chalton Street in St Pancras. This seems to be an address of convenience for George as the report of their marriage in the 8 April 1851 edition of The Sussex Advertiser described George as being of the Stag Inn in Lewes and in the census of 30 March 1851 he was recorded as a publican in North Street in Lewes, which was where the Stag Inn was situated.

They lived at Lewes in Sussex where they had seven children born between 1853 and 1872. When their first child was baptised in mid-1853 they were living in All Saints Parish in Lewes and George was an innkeeper. In the census of 7 April 1861 they were living in Lewes High Street with their then four children, George was a master cooper and they had 41-year-old George Langford as a lodger. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 they were living at 3 North Street in Lewes with five of their children, George was now described as a master carpenter and they had two lodgers, one of whom was still George Langford and the other was 80-year-old Eliza Westfield. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were still living in North Street, now with their six youngest children, and George was continuing to work as a cooper. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at 6 Malling Street in the Cliffe area of Lewes with five of their now adult children, and George, at the age of 72, was working on his own account as a cooper.

George died at Lewes at the age of 79, his death being registered during the 1st quarter of 1898. In the census of 31 March 1901 Susan was living with her son George and his wife at the Rainbow Inn, 179 High Street, Lewes, and she was living on her own means. Susan died at Lewes at the age of 74 (not 76 as given on her death certificate), her death being registered during the 4th quarter of 1902.

 

 

George and Susanís eldest child was Elizabeth Susan Kemp who was born at Lewes in Sussex, and baptised at St John the Baptist Church, Southover, Lewes on 9 June 1853 . In the census of 7 April 1861 Elizabeth, at the age of 8, was living with her parents in Lewes High Street, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Elizabeth, now aged 18, was a live-in nurse to the family of upholsterer William Hamilton at 19 Clifton Road in Brighton. In the census of 5 April 1891 Elizabeth, still unmarried at the age of 38, was working as a ladyís maid and living with her parents at 6 Malling Street in the Cliffe area of Lewes.

 

George and Susanís second child was George Kemp who was born at Lewes in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1855. In the census of 7 April 1861 George, at the age of 6, was living with his parents in Lewes High Street, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 George, now aged 16 was working as a printerís compositor and living with his parents at 3 North Street in Lewes. In the census of 3 April 1881 George, at the age of 26, was continuing to work as a printerís compositor and he was still living with his parents in North Street in Lewes.

In about 1886 when he was about 31 years old George married Mary Ann Card, who was about 41. There were no children from this marriage. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at the Rainbow Inn, 179 High Street, Lewes, where George was working on his own account as the beerhouse keeper. They had Mary Ann's widowed mother, Rose Card, and a young nephew, Charles Card, living with them, and they also had widower William Holloway as a boarder. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 they were still living at the Rainbow Inn where George was working on his own account as the innkeeper. They had George's widowed mother living with them, and also their niece and nephew, Ellen and George Coppard, who were working for George as barmaid and barman. In the census of 2 April 1911 George and Mary Ann were loging in one room of Western House, 28 Western Road, Lewes and George was now working as a compositor.

 

George and Susanís third child was William Kemp who was born at Lewes in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1857. In the census of 7 April 1861 William, at the age of 4, was living with his parents in Lewes High Street, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 William, now aged 14 was living with his parents at 3 North Street in Lewes, and he was still going to school. In the census of 3 April 1881 William, at the age of 24, was an unemployed cooper living with his parents in North Street in Lewes. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 William, still unmarried at the age of 34, was working as a painter and living with his parents at 6 Malling Street in the Cliffe area of Lewes.

 

George and Susanís fourth child was Charles Kemp who was born at Lewes in Sussex in about 1859. In the census of 7 April 1861 Charles, at the age of 2, was living with his parents in Lewes High Street. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Charles, now aged 12 was living with his parents at 3 North Street in Lewes, and he was going to school. In the census of 3 April 1881 Charles, at the age of 22, was working as a painter and living with his parents in North Street in Lewes.

 

George and Susanís fifth child was Lewis Kemp who was born at Lewes in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1862. In the census of 2 April 1871 Lewis, at the age of 8, was living with his parents at 3 North Street in Lewes, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Lewis, now aged 18, was working as a cooper and living with his parents in North Street in Lewes. In the census of 5 April 1891 Lewis, at the age of 28, was continuing to work as a cooper and he was living with his parents at 6 Malling Street in the Cliffe area of Lewes. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Lewis, still unmarried at the age of 38, was still to work as a cooper and boarding with the family of James Russeu at 36 Coleman Street in Brighton.

 

George and Susanís sixth child was Ellen Kemp who was born at Lewes in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1865. In the census of 2 April 1871 Ellen, at the age of 5, was living with her parents at 3 North Street in Lewes, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Ellen, now aged 15, was living with her parents in North Street in Lewes. In the census of 5 April 1891 Ellen, still unmarried at the age of 25, was working as a ladyís maid and living with her parents at 6 Malling Street in the Cliffe area of Lewes. When she was 35 years old Ellen married Herbert Braybrooks in Lewes registration district during the 4th quarter of 1900. In the census of 31 March 1901 they were living at the Police Station, Church Hill, Bexhill, Sussex, and Herbert was a police constable.

 

George and Susanís seventh child was Emily Kemp who was born at Lewes in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1872. In the census of 3 April 1881 Emily, at the age of 8, was living with her parents in North Street in Lewes. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Emily, now aged 18, was working as a dressmaker and living with her parents at 6 Malling Street in the Cliffe area of Lewes. When she was 26 years old Emily married William Wilkins in Lewes registration district during the 2nd quarter of 1899. They had at least one child born in Lewes registration district during 1899. In the census of 31 March 1901 they were living in two rooms at 6 Tichborne Street in Brighton with their young son, and William was a railway policeman.

 

 

William and Emilyís only known child was William George Wilkins whose birth was registered in Lewes registration district during the 4th quarter of 1899. In the census of 31 March 1901 William, at the age of 1, was living with his parents in two rooms at 6 Tichborne Street in Brighton.


[1] ESRO AMS5943/8/6 Copy of the will of William Grames proved by Archdeaconry of Lewes.

[2] ESRO W/SM/D12/p417 Will of Thomas Davey proved by Deanery of South Malling.

[3] ESRO SAS-WG/132 Conveyance.

[4] TNA PROB 6/220 Admon of Hopestill Muddle granted by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury.

[5] ESRO ADA/199 pp.10 to 14 Ditchling Garden Manor Court Book 1826-1856.

[6] ESRO ADA/199 pp.95 to 97 Ditchling Garden Manor Court Book 1826-1856.

[7] R F Hunnisett East Sussex Coronersí Records 1688-1838 SRS Vol.89 p.195.

[8] ESRO ADA/199 pp.114 & 115 Ditchling Garden Manor Court Book 1826-1856.

[9] ESRO PAR308/2/1/3 Ditchling Memoranda Book 1833-1849.

[10] ESRO ADA/199 pp.120 to 121 Ditchling Garden Manor Court Book 1826-1856.

[11] ESRO TD/E 103 Ditchling Tithe Map & Apportionments.

[12] BPMA POST 58/72 British Postal Service Appointment Books.

[13] ESRO ADA/199 pp.166 & 167 Ditchling Garden Manor Court Book 1826-1856.

[14] ESRO ADA/199 pp.205, 206 & 208 Ditchling Garden Manor Court Book 1826-1856.

[15] ESRO ADA/200 pp.45 to 49 Ditchling Garden Manor Court Book 1858-1921.

[16] ESRO ADA/200 pp.65 & 66 Ditchling Garden Manor Court Book 1858-1921.

[17] ESRO ADA/200 pp.74 & 75 Ditchling Garden Manor Court Book 1858-1921.

[18] TNA MH 94/4 Lunacy Commission Metropolitan Licensed Houses Admission Registers 1859-1875.

[19] TNA WO 100/46 f.118 South Africa 1877-1879 Medal Roll for 17th Lancers.

[20] TNA WO 102/7 f.26v Good Conduct Medal Roll for 17th Lancers.

[21] TNA WO 97/3515 Army Discharge Papers for Robert Muddle.

[22] John Stenning A Full Life in Ditchling, Hassocks & Burgess Hill 1919-1997 Country Books 1998

[23] SHC 3043/5/1/1/6 page 719, Brookwood Hospital, Woking, Admissions Register No 6 &

        SHC 3043/5/1/1/7 page 110, Brookwood Hospital, Woking, Admissions Register No 1 &

        TNA MH 94/30, Lunacy Commission County Asylum Rate Aided Patient Admission Registers, 1891.

[24] TNA WO 372/14 First World War Medal Card for Albert Charles Muddle.

[25] TNA BT 27/1607 Outwards Passenger Lists, London June - October 1947.

[26] TNA BT 26/1238/237 Inwards Passenger Lists, SS Mantola Plymouth January - December 1948.

[27] TNA BT 27/1607 Outwards Passenger Lists, London April - August 1949.

[28] TNA BT 26/1288/103 Inwards Passenger Lists, SS Rhodesia Castle London July 1952.

[29] TNA BT 26/1328/56 Inwards Passenger Lists, MV Boschfontein Southampton March 1955.

[30] TNA BT 27/1776/1 Outwards Passenger Lists, SS Warwick Castle London June 1955.

[31] TNA BT 26/1403/129 Inwards Passenger Lists, SS Rhodesia Castle London 19 April 1958.

[32] TNA BT 27/1854 Outwards Passenger Lists, London September 1958.

[33] NARA film T715_6666 Passenger & Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York 1897-1957.

[34] NARA A3426 Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Oswego, New York 1943-1972.

 

Copyright © Derek Miller 2005-2015

Last updated 10 June 2015

 

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