THE MUDDLE FAMILIES

THE LINEAGE & HISTORY OF THE MUDDLE FAMILIES OF THE WORLD

INCLUDING VARIANTS MUDDEL, MUDDELL, MUDLE & MODDLE

 

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THE SUSSEX MUDDLE FAMILIES

THE ARDINGLY MUDDLES

 

Introduction

Thomas & Ursula Muddle’s Family

William & Mary Muddle’s Family

John & Mary Ann Muddle’s Family

Henry & Clara Muddle’s Family

Henry & Martha Muddle’s Family

Frederick & Harriet Muddle’s Family

William & Ann Muddle’s Family

Edmund & Sarah Muddle’s Family

William & Anne/Elizabeth Muddle’s Family

Charles & Sarah/Mary Muddle’s Family

Charles & Elizabeth Muddle’s Family

George & Ann Muddell’s Family

Edward & Phoebe Muddell’s Family

Charles & Sarah Muddle’s Family

Thomas & Elizabeth Muddle’s Family

Index of Family Members

Charts

 

 

Thomas & Elizabeth Muddle’s Family

 

Chart of Thomas & Elizabeth Muddle’s Family

 

Thomas Muddle married Elizabeth Still at the Church of the Transfiguration in Pyecombe, Sussex on 26 June 1780. They first lived at Lindfield in Sussex where they had two children born in 1781 and 1783. They then moved to East Grinstead in Sussex where they had five more children born between 1786 and 1801. A poem titled A Poetical Directory of the Inhabitants of East Grinstead written by Thomas Palmer and dated 1 November 1799 contains the line Hugget, Awcocks, Muddle, they are butchers that provisions slay that must be referring to Thomas.[1] When he was about 45 years old Thomas was recorded on the Sussex Militia List of 1803 as a butcher of East Grinstead. Elizabeth died at East Grinstead, at the age of 57, and she was buried in St Swithun’s Churchyard at East Grinstead on 12 April 1816. Two years later Thomas died at East Grinstead, at the age of 60 (not 61 as given on his burial record), and he was buried in St Swithun’s Churchyard at East Grinstead on 26 December 1818.

 

Their children were:

Edmund 1781-1804  Phoebe 1783-1794  Harriet 1786-?  Stephen 1790-1825

Caroline 1794-1823  William 1797-1820  George 1801-?

 

 

 

Thomas and Elizabeth’s eldest child was Edmund Muddle who was born at Lindfield in Sussex, and baptised at All Saints’ Church in Lindfield on 16 October 1781. Edmund never married and was living at Croydon in Surrey when he died at the age of 23, and was buried in the Churchyard of St John the Baptist at Croydon on 23 October 1804, when his name was recorded in the burial register as Edward Muddle.

 

Thomas and Elizabeth’s second child was Phoebe Muddle who was born at Lindfield in Sussex, and baptised at All Saints’ Church in Lindfield on 24 July 1783. Phoebe died at East Grinstead in Sussex, at the age of ten, and she was buried in St Swithun’s Churchyard at East Grinstead on 9 May 1794.

 

Thomas and Elizabeth’s third child was Harriet Muddle who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 23 July 1786. When she was about 20 years old Harriet married John Page at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 26 May 1806. They had one child born at East Grinstead in 1809. Then they moved to Croydon in Surrey where they had nine more children born between 1811 and 1827, the first two of whom were twins. In the census of 6 June 1841 they were living in King Street, Croydon with their youngest child, and John was a shoemaker. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 they were living at 9 Middle Street in Croydon and John was continuing to work as a shoemaker. They had their 40-year-old bachelor son, Thomas, and their grandson, 11-year-old James Stevens, living with them. John died when he was about 70 years old, his death being registered in Croydon registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1851. Seven years later Harriet died at the age of 72, her death being registered in Croydon registration district during the 4th quarter of 1858.

 

 

John and Harriet’s eldest child was William Page who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 29 January 1809.

 

John and Harriet’s second child, one of twins, was Thomas Page who was born at Croydon in Surrey, and baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Croydon on 27 February 1811.. In the census of 30 March 1851 Thomas, still a bachelor at the age of 40, was working as a groom and living with his parents at 9 Middle Street in Croydon.

 

John and Harriet’s third child, one of twins, was Elizabeth Page who was born at Croydon in Surrey, and baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Croydon on 27 February 1811.

 

John and Harriet’s fourth child was Phoebe Page who was born at Croydon in Surrey, and baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Croydon on 23 June 1813.

 

John and Harriet’s fifth child was Caroline Page who was born at Croydon in Surrey, and baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Croydon on 11 October 1815.

 

John and Harriet’s sixth child was James Page who was born at Croydon in Surrey, and baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Croydon on 6 March 1818.

 

John and Harriet’s seventh child was Edmund Page who was born at Croydon in Surrey, and baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Croydon on 22 September 1819.

 

John and Harriet’s eighth child was Rachel Mudelle Page who was born at Croydon in Surrey, and baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Croydon on 28 July 1822.

 

John and Harriet’s ninth child was John Page who was born at Croydon in Surrey, and baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Croydon during October 1824.

 

John and Harriet’s tenth child was Charles Page who was born at Croydon in Surrey, and baptised at St John the Baptist Church in Croydon on 7 October 1827. In the census of 6 June 1841 Charles, at the age of 13, was living with his parents in King Street, Croydon.

 

 

Thomas and Elizabeth’s fourth child was Stephen Muddle who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 14 February 1790. When he was 21 years old Stephen married 20-year-old Elizabeth Istead at St Swithun's Church in East Grinstead on 29 September 1811. Elizabeth had been baptised at St Swithun's Church in East Grinstead on 26 December 1790 as the daughter of Joseph and Mary Histed (according to a note on her burial record). Stephen and Elizabeth lived at East Grinstead where they had eight children born between 1811, less than two months after their marriage, and 1825. When their second child was baptised in 1813 Stephen was described as being a gardener; then at the baptisms of their subsequent children, from 1814 to 1825, he was described as being a labourer, but this was probably just a general term, and he was still actually a gardener, because in the 1821 census and when his daughter Elizabeth married in 1842 he was described as a gardener.

Around the time that their fourth child was born in early 1817 the family seems to have 'fallen on hard times' and become a charge, or potential charge, on the parish of East Grinstead, as the East Grinstead parish authorities had the local Justices of the Peace, Edward Cranston and Magens Dorrien Magens, issue a Removal Order for Stephen Muddle, his wife Elizabeth, and children, Edmund aged 5, Phoebe aged 3, Mary aged 2, and an infant not yet baptised, to be removed to Lindfield. The parish authorities in Lindfield objected to this and appealed at the Lewes Quarter Sessions held on 18 April 1817 to have the JPs order revoked, and after hearing counsel for both side the Quarter Sessions Court quashed the JPs order.[2] This was presumably because the court found that East Grinstead, and not Lindfield, was Stephen's 'Place of legal Settlement', as he had been born in East Grinstead where his father must have obtained legal settlement as a butcher who presumably paid at least the qualifying amount of property rent. Possibly the parish authorities of East Grinstead had tried to argue that as Stephen's father had been born in Lindfield this should also be Stephen's 'Place of legal Settlement', anything to get a charge off the parish's poor rate! Anyway the family stayed in East Grinstead.

In the census of 28 May 1821 Stephen and his family were living in the Town Division of East Grinstead and Stephen was working as a gardener. In one place in the census the family is stated to consist of four males and four females, and in another place to consist of three males and six females; with one male under 5, one in the age range of 20 to 30 and one in the range 30 to 40, three of the females are under 5, one in the age range of 5 to 10, and two in the range 20 to 30. The three males are thought to be Stephen as the one aged 30 to 40, his son William as the one under 5, and his brother George as the one aged 20 to 30; his son Edmund had at this time run away from home but later returned. It's thought the number of females should be seven and that the two aged 20 to 30 are Stephen's wife Elizabeth and his widowed sister-in-law Rachael Muddle, the three under 5 are Stephen's daughters, Elizabeth and Lucy, and Rachael's daughter Caroline, and that there should be two rather than one in the age range 5 to 10 these being Stephen's daughters Phoebe and Mary.

Four years after the census Stephen died at East Grinstead, at the age of 35 (not 33 as given on his burial record), and he was buried in St Swithun's Churchyard at East Grinstead on 13 December 1825 at the same time as his 11-year-old daughter Mary. Had father and daughter possibly died of the same infectious illness or possibly as a result of an accident they were both involved in?

Elizabeth was recorded in the 1828 edition of Pigot & Co.'s Directory of Sussex as being a fruiterer of East Grinstead, and had probably been a fruiterer from at least August 1822 when her eldest son was recorded as not attending the Zion Chapel Sunday School because he was selling fruit for his mother. In the census of 30 May 1831 widow Elizabeth and her family, consisting of one male and five females, were living in the Town Division of East Grinstead. The one male was Elizabeth's youngest son, 8-year-old William, and the five females would have been Elizabeth and probably her four surviving daughters, Phoebe, Elizabeth, Lucy and Caroline, though the age ranges given for these young females are not in full agreement with their actual ages.

In the census of 6 June 1841 Elizabeth, together with four of her unmarried children, Stephen, Lucy, William and Caroline, and her married daughter Phoebe Draper with her husband and two children, was living at Chapel Lane in East Grinstead and she was now working as a charwoman. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Elizabeth was living at an unnamed house in the countryside to the south-east of East Grinstead town with her married daughter Elizabeth Wickens, unmarried daughter Lucy, and grandson William Muddle, who was the son of her widowed son Edmund. Elizabeth was now described as being a ‘hawker, pie and bun seller’, and the family of her married daughter Phoebe Draper was living nearby. In the census of 7 April 1861 Elizabeth was back living in Chapel Lane (now called Chapel Street) at East Grinstead with her married daughter Lucy Simmons, and her granddaughter Eliza Draper, and Elizabeth was now, at the age of 70, described as being a costermonger.

In the census of 2 April 1871 Elizabeth was living with the family her daughter Phoebe Draper in West Street at East Grinstead. Chapel Lane/Street had been renamed West Street so Elizabeth was still living in the same street but in a different house. Elizabeth died at Pirie’s Place, West Street at the age of 89 (not 90 as given on her death certificate and burial record, if the note on her burial record about her baptism is correct), and she was buried by St Swithun’s Church in plot 578 of Queens Street Cemetery in East Grinstead on 12 March 1880. This is the plot that her son William had been buried in during 1877.

 

Their children were:

Edmund 1811-1877  Phoebe 1813-1891  Mary 1814-1825  Stephen 1817-1844

Elizabeth 1819-1889  Lucy 1821-1883  William 1823-1877  Caroline 1825-1897

 

 

Stephen and Elizabeth’s eldest child was Edmund Muddle, also known as Edward, who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex and baptised with the name Edmund at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 24 November 1811.

Edmund was enrolled at the Zion Chapel Sunday School in East Grinstead during the 6 June 1819 to 29 May 1820 school year, when he was 8 years old, but the register records that he didn’t attend during that year. Then during the following school year of 28 May 1820 to 20 May 1821 he attended twice and was then absent after 6 August 1820 having ‘Gone away’ ‘Run away’, presumably this means that he had run away from home when he was just under 9 years old. Edmund was not recorded as living with his parents in the Town Division of East Grinstead in the census of 28 May 1821, but he must have returned home later as he was readmitted to the Zion Chapel Sunday School during the following school year of 27 May 1821 to 19 May 1822 and presumably attended the school as there are no comments in the register to the contrary. During the next school year of 26 May 1822 to 24 May 1823 Edmund was recorded as being absent from 18 August 1822, when he was just under 11 years old, as he was ‘Occupied in selling fruit for his mother’. Edmund presumably never returned to school as there are no further records of him attending.[3]

 

 

When he was 21 years old Edmund, using the name Edward, married Harriet Field at Speldhurst Church in Kent on 2 June 1833. They had two children. They initially lived at East Grinstead where their first child was baptised on 2 February 1834, just 8 months after their marriage. Then when their second child was baptised in 1836 they were living at Rushy Green, Lewisham, Kent, and Edmund was working as a blacksmith. They must have then moved back to East Grinstead as Harriet died there at the age of 32, and was buried in St Swithun’s Churchyard at East Grinstead on 3 January 1843. Edmund is thought to have then moved to Lingfield in Surrey as his second child died there in 1844 and was buried back at East Grinstead.

In the census of 7 April 1861 Edmund was a blacksmith living at 27 Oxford Street in Brighton with 35-year-old nurse Priscilla Muddle, who was recorded as his wife, and two daughters, 19-year-old Matilda Muddle and 12-year-old Eliza Muddle. There is no record of Edmund marrying Priscilla so it seems likely that they were simply living together. What is known of Priscilla's past is that she was the daughter of James and Christina Lowe, and she had been baptised at St John the Baptist Church, Lane End, Longton near Stoke-on Trent in Staffordshire on 26 May 1822. When she was 16 years old Priscilla married George Hewitt at Milwich Parish Church near Stone in Staffordshire on 4 June 1838. George and Priscilla had one child, Matilda Hewitt, who was born on 4 June 1841 while they were living at Bolton's Row in Lane End, Staffordshire, and two days later all three were recorded as living there in the census of 6 June 1841. George, who had worked as a labourer and miner, died of an accidental scold in April 1843, possibly in a boiler house explosion. Priscilla then moved to Beverley in Yorkshire where she had another child, Eliza Hewitt, on 20 June 1848; this child's father was given as blacksmith John Hewitt on both her birth certificate and at her baptism at Atherstone near Tamworth in Warwickshire on 7 January 1849. No record of Priscilla's marriage to a John Hewitt has been found or any other record of this John Hewitt. Neither Priscilla and her two children, nor Edmund Muddle have been found in the 1851 census. It's thought possible that Edmund and Priscilla were then living together and that Edmund was the father of Eliza Hewitt; John Hewitt being a fictitious name made up by Priscilla to make it look as if she was married but giving him Edmund's occupation of blacksmith. It's all very confusing regarding who Eliza's father was, because at the registration of the birth of her first child, before she was married, Eliza gave her maiden name as Hewitt, but then when she married she used the name Muddle and named Edmund as her father, and at the births of her subsequent children she gave her maiden name as Muddle. Another explanation is that Eliza was fathered by John Hewitt but 'adopted' by Edmund when he stated living with Priscilla, possibly when Eliza was very young so that Eliza thought of him as her father but considered Hewitt to be her maiden name. Neither Priscilla nor her daughter Matilda has been found under the name Muddle in any other record than the 1861 census. When in 1891 Matilda Hewitt married the man she had been living with since about 1869, she gave her father's name as George Hewitt and one of the witnesses was her half-sister Eliza Caleno (née Hewitt/Muddle).

Edmund and Priscilla were living at 11 Thomas Street in Brighton when they had a son born there on 17 April 1863; Edmund was then a journeyman blacksmith. But by the time this child was baptised on 1 January 1865 they had moved to Kingston-upon-Thames in Surrey. It seems that Edmund and Priscilla then separated with their son staying with Edmund and Priscilla moving to the area of Tonbridge in Kent, probably to find work. Priscilla under the surname Hewitt was admitted to Tonbridge Union Workhouse on the Saturday 8 September 1866, her admission being ordered by W Cronk the Relieving Officer due to sickness, so she was probably in the workhouse infirmary. Twenty days later, on 28 September 1866, Priscilla died in the workhouse at the age of 44 (not 43 as given on her death certificate), from debility and phthisis (pulmonary tuberculosis), and on her death certificate she was described as having formerly been a domestic servant.

In the census of 2 April 1871 Edmund, now stating that he was a widower, and his son were living in a Lodging House at 51 & 52 Chesterfield Street in Brighton; Edmund was working as a blacksmith and they had two men lodging with them. Edmund’s son died at Brighton in 1875, when 12 years old. Edmund died at the age of 66 (not 67 as given on his death certificate), his death being registered in Farnham registration district in Surrey during the 4th quarter of 1877.

 

 

Edmund and Harriet’s eldest child was William Muddle who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 2 February 1834.

At about 8 o’clock in the evening of Tuesday 25 February 1851 a number of people gathered outside Sackville College in East Grinstead after the funeral of Mrs Alchin who had been an inmate of the college.[4] An anti Puseyite[5] riot ensued in which the hedge was set alight, windows were smashed with stones, a great noise was made by shouting and banging on pots and kettles, and residents were put in fear for their safety. It seems that earlier the relatives and others from the town had objected to the form of burial service that it was proposed to observe at the funeral of Mrs Alchin, and in the afternoon had taken her body from the College and carried out a funeral as they desired.

Two days later a complaint was made to the Justices of the Peace by George Paul that William Muddle, William Evershed, Joseph Simmons, Walter Cotton, John Brinkhurst, George Hooker, Charles Baker, Thomas Potter, Joseph Martin and Charles Lynn were among those who rioted. At the hearing held before the Justices of the Peace on 4 March 1851 the majority of the seven witnesses didn’t name any of the rioters, and only George Paul, who gave the most detailed account, named William Muddle, stating that he saw him in the college field with a crowd beating a tin kettle. After hearing the charge and the evidence all ten of the accused had nothing to say and were committed for trial at the next assizes.[6]

 

 

William had presumably been given bail because four weeks later in the census of 30 March 1851 William, at the age of 17, was working as a farm labourer and living with his grandmother Elizabeth Muddle and two of his aunts in an unnamed house in the countryside to the south-east of East Grinstead town.

The Criminal Registers record that William Muddle with William Evershed, Walter Cotton, John Brinkhurst and Charles Lynn all appeared before the Assizes held at Lewes on 4 August 1851 charged with riot and assault. Charles Lynn was found not guilty and the other four, including William Muddle, were discharged on sureties.[7] W H Hills in his The History of East Grinstead, published in 1906, states that seven, though only five are listed in the criminal registers, of the ten accused were sent for trial at Lewes Assizes, but as they issued a public apology for their conduct and at the assizes pleaded guilty, the case against them was not pressed and they were bound over to come up for judgment if called upon.

The following year, on 18 September 1852, William Muddle enlisted in the Royal Marines at Leatherhead in Surrey. It seems that those recruiting William had some concern about him and wrote to S Winser at East Grinstead (probably Samuel Winser publican at the Ship Inn in East Grinstead in the 1851 census) and the letter that was sent in reply was kept with his attestation papers:

East Grinstead

Sept 20th 1852

Sir

In answer to your letter respecting William Muddle I believe him to be honest but he run away from his situation last Thursday week and if he had come back in the course of a week I have every reason to believe that his Master would have looked over it.

Yours &c S Winser

William’s attestation papers record him as being a 5ft 8Ľin tall labourer with a ruddy complexion, grey eyes, dark brown hair and no distinctive marks. He stated that he had been born at East Grinstead and gave his age as 19 years and 10 months, but he was probably about a year younger than this. He also stated that he was not an apprentice, was not married, and had never before served in any of the armed services. It seems that William was illiterate, as he just made his mark, a very shaky cross that looks as if it was made by someone who had never handled a pen before, where he had to sign his attestation papers. He received 2s 6d when he enlisted and a Ł3 17s 6d bounty for enlisting for 12 years.[8]

William was a private in Company 17 of the Chatham Division of the Royal Marines when, having served nearly half the term he had enlisted for, he died in Melville Hospital, Chatham, Kent on 27 June 1858 at the age of 24 (not 25 as given on his death certificate) from jaundice that he had suffered from for 16 days.

 

Edmund and Harriet’s second child was Edward Muddle, also known as Edmund, who was baptised with the name Edward at St Mary’s Church, Lewisham High Street, Lewisham, Kent, on 31 December 1836. Edward died at Lingfield in Surrey at the age of seven, and he was buried in St Swithun’s Churchyard at East Grinstead on 19 April 1844, under the name Edmund.

 

George and Priscilla’s only child was Matilda Hewitt who was born at Bolton’s Row in Lane End, Staffordshire on 4 June 1841. Then two days later in the census of 6 June 1841 Matilda, at the age of 2 days, was living with her parents at Bolton’s Row. Matilda’s father died in 1843, and in 1848, when her sister Eliza was born, Matilda was presumably living with her mother at Beverley in Yorkshire. In the census of 7 April 1861 Matilda, at the age of 19, was living with her mother and her mother’s partner, Edmund Muddle, at 27 Oxford Street in Brighton, Sussex, and she was going to school.

By 1869, and probably from about 1866, Matilda had started to live with Thomas Whitaker. Thomas was the son of hatter Thomas Whitaker and his wife Emma; he had been born in Brighton and his birth registered during the 4th quarter of 1846. Thomas and Matilda had four known children; their first two were born in Brighton in 1869 and early 1871. In the census of 2 April 1871 they were living at 47 Chesterfield Street in Brighton with their then two children, and Thomas was working as a hatter. They then moved to Aldershot in Hampshire where their other two known children were born in 1873 and 1875.

In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at 2 Cobbitts Cottages in Little Wellington Street, Aldershot with their four children, and Thomas was still a hatter. In this census their surname was recorded as Taylor and they had 2-year-old Joseph Taylor. who was recorded as being their son born in London, living with them; he is not thought to be their son as why would he have been born in London when they were living in Aldershot, but he was possibly a foster child, and it was possibly from him that the name Taylor came and was by mistake given to the whole family by the census enumerator.

IIn the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at 6 Bolton Street in Lambeth, London with their four children. Thomas was continuing to work as a hatter and he was now also an employer; two of those working for him would have been his wife, who was a hatter's trimmer, and his son, who was also a hatter. Later that year after they had been living together for at least 22 years, Thomas, at the age of about 45, and Matilda, at the age of 50, married at St Agnes Church in Newington, London on 28 October 1891. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Thomas and Matilda were boarding with the family of their daughter Alice and her husband, builder's labourer Charles Hole, at 42 Silverthorne Road in Battersea, London, and Thomas was now working as a hatter on his own account at home. In the census of 2 April 1911 Thomas and Matilda were occupying two rooms at 9 Wycliffe Road in Battersea; the other four rooms in the house were occupied by the family of their daughter Alice. Thomas was now working on his own account at home as an umbrella repairer. In this census they recorded that they had been married 44 years, so they had probably started to live together in about 1866; they also stated that they'd had ten children only four of whom were still alive, these are presumably the four known from the censuses.

Matilda had been living at Spondon Road in Tottenham, London when she died in Edmonton Temporary Infirmary on 15 February 1917, at the age of 75, from pneumonia. Four months later Thomas had been living at 48 Haldane Road in Fulham, London when he died in Kensington Infirmary on 7 June 1917, at the age of 70 (not 76 as given on his death certificate), from bronchitis.

On his death certificate Thomas was recorded as having been an umbrella maker. His wife's death certificate stated that Thomas had formerly been a stage comedian, and as family tradition has it that an ancestor had been on the stage under the stage name of Dan Taylor, which is another possible source of the Taylor name in the 1881 census, it's thought likely that Thomas was probably involved in this part-time as a sideline to his hatter's business; his brother-in-law Thomas Caleno had also been involved with the stage.

 

 

Thomas and Matilda’s eldest known child was Thomas Whitaker who was born at Brighton in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1869. In the census of 2 April 1871 Thomas, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at 47 Chesterfield Street in Brighton. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Thomas, now aged 12, was living with his parents at 2 Cobbitts Cottages in Little Wellington Street, Aldershot, Hampshire, and he was going to school. In the census of 5 April 1891 Thomas, at the age of 22, was living with his parents at 6 Bolton Street in Lambeth, London; he was now working as a hatter, presumably for his father.

 

Thomas and Matilda’s second known child was Eliza Rosetta Whitaker, known as Liza, who was born at Brighton in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1871. In the census of 2 April 1871 Eliza, at the age of 2 weeks, was living with her parents at 47 Chesterfield Street in Brighton. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Eliza, now aged 10, was living with her parents at 2 Cobbitts Cottages in Little Wellington Street, Aldershot, Hampshire, and she was going to school. In the census of 5 April 1891 Eliza, at the age of 20, was working as a domestic servant and living with her parents at 6 Bolton Street in Lambeth, London.

 

Thomas and Matilda’s third known child was Alice Rosina Whitaker who was born at Aldershot in Hampshire, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1873. In the census of 3 April 1881 Alice, at the age of 8, was living with her parents at 2 Cobbitts Cottages in Little Wellington Street, Aldershot, Hampshire, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Alice, now aged 18, was working as a domestic servant and living with her parents at 6 Bolton Street in Lambeth, London.

 

Thomas and Matilda’s fourth known child was Priscilla Matilda Whitaker, known as Priss, who was born at Aldershot in Hampshire, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1875. In the census of 3 April 1881 Priscilla, at the age of 6, was living with her parents at 2 Cobbitts Cottages in Little Wellington Street, Aldershot, Hampshire, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Priscilla, now aged 16, was working as a domestic servant and living with her parents at 6 Bolton Street in Lambeth, London.

 

 

Edmund and Priscilla’s eldest child (Priscilla's second child, either fathered or 'adopted' by Edmund) was Eliza Hewitt/Muddle, known as Lizzie, who was born at Beverley in Yorkshire on 20 June 1848, and baptised at St Mary’s Church in Atherstone near Tamworth in Warwickshire on 7 January 1849, as the daughter of John and Priscilla Hewitt. In the census of 7 April 1861 Eliza, at the age of 12, was living with her ‘parents’, Edmund and Priscilla, at 27 Oxford Street in Brighton, and she was going to school.

When she was 22 years old Eliza married 23-year-old Thomas Caleno at St Peter’s Church, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire on 19 January 1870. They were both then living at Stanhope Street in Cheltenham and Thomas was a French Polisher. Thomas was the son of John and Catherine Patrickson, and he had been born at St Giles in London in about 1846. John and Catherine and their elder son Joseph, who were all born in Ireland, are thought to have left Ireland during the Potato Famine and settled in London, with a brief stay in Cheltenham in the late 1850s. For a time before his marriage Thomas is thought to have been a conjuror and to have made-up the name Caleno to use initially as a ‘stage name’, influenced possibly by an association with the famous Victorian music hall comedian Dan Leno. Thomas then went on to replace completely, his name of Patrickson, by the name Caleno.

Thomas and Eliza had nine children, two of whom died in infancy. Their first child was born at 21 Stanhope Street in Cheltenham in 1868, two years before they married, so they had presumably been living together for about three years before their marriage. Their second child was born at Cheltenham soon after their marriage in 1870. This second child died five months later in Southampton registration district in Hampshire.

In the census of 2 April 1871 they were living at 1 St Andrew Street, Plymouth, Devon with their then one surviving child, and Thomas was continuing to work as a French Polisher. Their third child was born at Plymouth in May 1871 when they were living at 2 St Andrew Street. They then moved to Pimlico in London where their other six children were born between 1873 and 1891. They were living at 7 Eccleston Place in Pimlico when their fourth child was born in 1873. Then they were at 34 Hanover Street in Pimlico when their seventh child was born in 1880, and Thomas was still a French Polisher. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at 34 Hanover Street with five of their children; Thomas was working as a carpenter and Eliza as a laundress. When their eighth child died in 1884 they were living at 33 Hanover Street in Pimlico, and Thomas was now a picture frame maker. In January 1891, when their ninth child was born, they were continuing to live at 33 Hanover Street and Thomas was a master picture frame maker. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at 33 Hanover Street with four of their children; Thomas was a picture frame painter working on his own account, and they had five boarders.

Sometime between the 1891 and 1901 censuses Thomas and Eliza separated. In the census of 31 March 1901 Thomas was living alone at 235 Wandsworth Bridge Road in Fulham, London; he was a picture frame maker but no longer his own master. Eliza can not be found in this census. In the census of 2 April 1911 Thomas was living alone at 5 Lampton Road in Hounslow, Middlesex and working on his own account at home as a picture frame maker and french polisher. Eliza and her daughter Mabel were now living at 5 Clifton Road in Southall, Norwood, Middlesex, which was a shop and house, where Eliza was working on her own account as shop keeper for confectionery etc. and Mabel was her assistant.

Thomas was still a picture frame maker when he died at 5 Lampton Road, Hounslow, Middlesex on 14 July 1912, at the age of about 66 (not 61 as given on his death certificate), from valvular disease of the heart. Eighteen years later Eliza had been living at 13 Brathway Road, Wandsworth, London, when she died at 46 Ouseley Road, Balham, London on 24 March 1930, at the age of 81, from cardiovascular degeneration.

 

 

 

Thomas and Eliza’s eldest child was Matilda Margaretta Caleno who was born at 21 Stanhope Street, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire on 16 February 1868. In the census of 2 April 1871 Matilda, at the age of 3, was living with her parents at 1 St Andrew Street, Plymouth, Devon. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Matilda, now aged 13, was living with her parents at 34 Hanover Street, Pimlico, London, and she was going to school.

 

Thomas and Eliza’s second child was Thomas Caleno who was born at Cheltenham in Gloucestershire on 26 January 1870. Thomas died at Southampton in Hampshire on 21 July 1870, when he was just under 6 months old, from variola (smallpox).

 

Thomas and Eliza’s third child was Emily Christina Caleno who was born at 2 St Andrew Street, Plymouth, Devon on 12 May 1871. In the census of 3 April 1881 Emily, at the age of 9, was living with her parents at 34 Hanover Street, Pimlico, London, and she was going to school.

 

Thomas and Eliza’s fourth child was Thomas Caleno who was born at 7 Eccleston Place, Pimlico, London on 31 July 1873. In the census of 3 April 1881 Thomas, at the age of 7, was living with his parents at 34 Hanover Street in Pimlico, and he was going to school. Thomas worked on the railways; he was a guard in 1901 and a ticket inspector in 1909. Thomas, like his brothers, liked to dress-up in stage costume and do a comedy act.

 

 

Thomas and Eliza’s fifth child was Albert William Caleno who was born at Pimlico in London, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1876. In the census of 3 April 1881 Albert, at the age of 5, was living with his parents at 34 Hanover Street in Pimlico, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Albert, now aged 15, was working as a clerk and living with his parents at 33 Hanover Street.

 

Thomas and Eliza’s sixth child was Joseph Caleno who was born at Pimlico in London on 8 May 1878. In the census of 5 April 1891 Joseph, at the age of 12, was living with his parents at 33 Hanover Street in Pimlico.

 

Thomas and Eliza’s seventh child was Ernest Caleno who was born at 34 Hanover Street, Pimlico, London on 15 September 1880. In the census of 3 April 1881 Ernest, at the age of 6 months, was living with his parents at 34 Hanover Street. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Ernest, now aged 10, was living with his parents at 33 Hanover Street.

 

Thomas and Eliza’s eighth child was Stephen Walter Caleno who was born at Pimlico in London, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1882. Stephen died at 33 Hanover Street in Pimlico on 14 May 1884 , when only 2 years old, from cerebral congestion.

 

Thomas and Eliza’s ninth child was Mabel Edith Caleno who was born at 33 Hanover Street, Pimlico, London on 6 January 1891. In the census of 5 April 1891 Mabel, at the age of 3 months, was living with her parents at 33 Hanover Street.

 

 

Edmund and Priscilla’s second child was Stephen Walter Muddle who was born at 11 Thomas Street in Brighton on 17 April 1863, and baptised with the name Stephen Walter Charles Muddle at the Church of All Saints in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey on 1 January 1865. In the census of 2 April 1871 Stephen, at the age of 7, was living with his father in a Lodging House at 51 & 52 Chesterfield Street in Brighton, and he was going to school. Stephen died at the age of 12, his death being registered in Brighton registration district during the 2nd quarter of 1875.

 

 

 

Stephen and Elizabeth’s second child was Phoebe Muddle who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 28 April 1813. Phoebe attended the Zion Chapel Sunday School in East Grinstead.[9] In the census of 28 May 1821 Phoebe, at the age of 8, was living with her parents in the Town Division of East Grinstead, and then in the census of 30 May 1831 Phoebe, now aged 18, was living with her widowed mother in the Town Division of East Grinstead.

When she was 20 years old Phoebe married 23-year-old Charles Draper at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 18 August 1833. Charles was the son of Richard and Elizabeth Draper, and he had been baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 11 March 1810. Charles and Phoebe lived at East Grinstead and they had ten children born between 1834 and 1857, one of whom died in infancy. All these children were born at East Grinstead except their fifth child who was born at Croydon in Surrey during 1845.

In the census of 6 June 1841 Charles, Phoebe and their then two children were living with Phoebe’s widowed mother at Chapel Lane in East Grinstead and Charles was working as a shoemaker. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Charles was continuing to work as a shoemaker and they were living in an unnamed house in the countryside to the south-east of East Grinstead town with their five children, and Phoebe’s mother was living nearby. When they had four of their children baptised in early 1853 they were living at Culton’s Hill in East Grinstead Parish, which may be the same place.

They then moved back into East Grinstead Town, and they were living in Chapel Lane when their seventh child died in September 1854 and their last two children were born there in 1855 and 1857. In the census of 7 April 1861 they where living at Coopers Cottage in Chapel Street (the same road as Chapel Lane) with five of their sons. Charles was now described as being a master shoemaker and three of the family were working for him, Phoebe was a binder, and their two eldest sons, Alfred and Stephen, were assistant shoemakers. In the census of 2 April 1871 they were living at West Street in East Grinstead with three of their sons, two of their grandchildren, and Phoebe’s widowed mother, and Charles was still a shoemaker. This was probably the same house as in 1861 as Chapel Lane/Street had been renamed West Street.

Charles died at East Grinstead at the age of 63, and he was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 30 May 1873 in plot 576 of Queens Street Cemetery in East Grinstead. In the census of 3 April 1881 Phoebe, now described as being an annuitant, was still living in West Street, and she had her two youngest sons, William and Charles, and her grandson Charles Walder living with her. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Phoebe was living with the family of her son Charles at Bramble Cottages in West Street. Next-door in the other half of Bramble Cottages was the family of her son William. Later that year Phoebe died at West Street in East Grinstead at the age of 78 (not 80 as given on her death certificate), and she was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 24 July 1891 with her husband in plot 576 of Queens Street Cemetery in East Grinstead.

 

Their children were:

Ellen 1834-1920  Alfred 1837-1888  Caroline 1841-?  Elizabeth 1843-1933

Stephen 1845-1885  George 1848-1927  Richard 1850-1854

Eliza 1853-1926  William 1855-1945  Charles 1857-1939

 

 

 

Charles and Phoebe’s eldest child was Ellen Draper who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 21 December 1834. In the census of 6 June 1841 Ellen, at the age of 7, was living with her parents in the home of her grandmother Elizabeth Muddle at Chapel Lane in East Grinstead. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Ellen, now aged 16, was living with her parents in an unnamed cottage in the countryside to the south-east of East Grinstead town. In the census of 7 April 1861 Ellen, at the age of 26, was a live-in house servant to the family of umbrella maker Thomas Lulham at 166 North Street in Brighton, Sussex.

When she was 27 years old Ellen married 24-year-old Thomas May at the Church of St Nicholas in Brighton on 21 September 1862. Thomas was then a cabman living at 7 Blackman Street in Brighton, and Ellen was living at 10 St George Place in Brighton. Thomas was the son of flyman Edward May and his wife Jane; he had been born in Brighton and baptised at the Church of St Nicholas in Brighton on 17 June 1838. In the census of 2 April 1871 Thomas and Ellen were living at 24 Queen Street in Brighton, and Thomas was continuing to work as a cabman. They had two children, both sons, born at Brighton in 1872 and 1878. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at 16 Red Cross Street in Brighton with their two sons; Thomas was still a cabman and Ellen was working as a cook.

Thomas died at Brighton, at the age of 47 (not 50 as given on his death certificate), his death being registered during the 1st quarter of 1886. In the census of 5 April 1891 Ellen and her two sons were lodging with the family of Timothy Minell at 5 Little Western Street in Brighton, and Ellen was working as a domestic cook. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Ellen was living with the family of her now married eldest son, Thomas, at 18 Arnold Street in Brighton. In the census of 2 April 1911 Ellen was still living with the family of her son Thomas, but now at 7 Cromwell Street in Brighton, and she was now an Old Age Pensioner. Ellen died at the age of 86 (not 87 as given on her death certificate), her death being registered in Brighton registration district during the 4th quarter of 1920.

 

 

Thomas and Ellen’s eldest child was Thomas May who was born at Brighton in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1872. In the census of 3 April 1881 Thomas, at the age of 8, was living with his parents at 16 Red Cross Street in Brighton. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Thomas, now aged 18, was working as a labourer and, together with his widowed mother and brother, was lodging with the family of Timothy Minell at 5 Little Western Street in Brighton.

 

Thomas and Ellen’s second child was Edward May who was born at Brighton in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1878. In the census of 3 April 1881 Edward, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at 16 Red Cross Street in Brighton. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Edward, now aged 12, was going to school and, together with his widowed mother and brother, was lodging with the family of Timothy Minell at 5 Little Western Street in Brighton.

 

 

Charles and Phoebe’s second child was Alfred Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 15 October 1837. In the census of 6 June 1841 Alfred, at the age of 3, was living with his parents in the home of his grandmother Elizabeth Muddle at Chapel Lane in East Grinstead. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Alfred, now aged 13, was living with his parents in an unnamed cottage in the countryside to the south-east of East Grinstead town. In the census of 7 April 1861 Alfred, at the age of 23, was living with his parents in Coopers Cottage, Chapel Street, East Grinstead, and he was working as an assistant shoemaker, presumably for his father.

When he was 23 years old Alfred married 19-year-old Sarah Jane Draper in Croydon registration district in Surrey during the 3rd quarter of 1861. Sarah was the daughter of John and Elizabeth Draper; she had been born at East Grinstead and her birth registered during the 3rd quarter of 1842. In the census of 2 April 1871 Alfred and Sarah were living in West Street at East Grinstead, and Alfred was working as a bootmaker. They had four children born at East Grinstead between 1873 and 1884, the last of whom died when only 11 weeks old. At the baptisms of their children their address was given as West Street except in 1876 when it was Oak Place, Glen Vue, East Grinstead. In the Census of 3 April 1881 they were living in West Street with their then three children, and Alfred was a boot and shoe maker. Alfred died at the back of West Street in East Grinstead, at the age of 51, and he was buried by St Swithun's Church on 15 October 1888 in plot 553 of Queens Street Cemetery in East Grinstead.

In the census of 5 April 1891 Sarah and her three children were living with the family of her brother-in-law George Draper at 70 West Street, and Sarah was working on her own account as a dressmaker. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Sarah and her two sons were living at 38 West Street. Sarah died at the age of 61, and she was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 16 April 1904, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead.

 

 

Alfred and Sarah’s eldest child was Minnie Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 31 August 1873. In the census of 3 April 1881 Minnie, at the age of 8, was living with her parents in West Street at East Grinstead, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Minnie, now aged 18, was living with her widowed mother and siblings in the home of the family of her father’s brother George Draper at 70 West Street.

 

Alfred and Sarah’s second child was Alfred John Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 24 September 1876. In the census of 3 April 1881 Alfred, at the age of 4, was living with his parents in West Street at East Grinstead, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Alfred, now aged 14, was working as a domestic gardener and living with his widowed mother and his siblings in the home of the family of his father’s brother George Draper at 70 West Street. In the census of 31 March 1901 Alfred, at the age of 24, was working as a plasterer and living with his mother at 38 West Street. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Alfred, still unmarried at the age of 34, was working as a plasterer and living with the family of his uncle and aunt, Charles and Mary Ann Draper, at 50 West Street in East Grinstead.

 

Alfred and Sarah’s third child was Charles Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1879. Charles was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 27 September 1885 when he was about 6 years old. In the census of 3 April 1881 Charles, at the age of 1, was living with his parents in West Street at East Grinstead. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Charles, now aged 11, was living with his widowed mother and siblings in the home of the family of his father’s brother George Draper at 70 West Street, and he was going to school. In the census of 31 March 1901 Charles, at the age of 21, was working as a plasterer and living with his mother at 38 West Street.

 

Alfred and Sarah’s forth child was William Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 23 February 1884. William died when he was only 11 weeks old, and he was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 3 March 1884, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead.

 

 

Charles and Phoebe’s third child was Caroline Draper who was born at East Grinstead in about 1841, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 20 August 1843. In the census of 30 March 1851 Caroline, at the age of 10, was living with her parents in an unnamed cottage in the countryside to the south-east of East Grinstead town. When she was 19 years old Caroline married 22-year-old Edward Walder at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 13 October 1860. They were both then living in East Grinstead and Edward was a railway porter. Edward was the son of James and Sarah Walder, and he had been baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 23 September 1838. In the census of 7 April 1861 Edward and Caroline were living at 8 Glenvue Road in East Grinstead, and Edward was working as a railway porter. They had two children; the first born at Lambeth in London in 1863, and the second at Bethnal Green in London in 1865.

It’s thought that Edward and Caroline separated sometime between the birth of their second child and the 1871 census. Because in the census of 2 April 1871 their two children were living with their maternal grandparents in East Grinstead, and Edward was living at 1 Black Dog Alley, Westminster, London; he was then an unemployed general labourer and he had 29-year-old Harriett Hastell living with him as his housekeeper. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Edward was working as a domestic gardener and living at 111 Heath Road, Clapham, London, in a house he shared with Abraham and Ellen Mallett and a lodger. In the census of 5 April 1891 Edward was living with the family of his married daughter Eliza Holder and he was now a foreman labourer. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Edward, at the age of 62, was working as a lavatory attendant for the London County Council, and boarding with the family of Henry Durrant at 64 Brundon Road, Camberwell, London. Edward died at the age of 68, his death being registered in Camberwell registration district during the 1st quarter of 1907.

No trace of Caroline has been found after the birth of her second child in 1865, and as Edward describes himself as still being married in two of the subsequent censuses it seems likely that Caroline was probably living with another man under his name.

 

 

Edward and Caroline’s eldest child was Eliza Walder whose birth was registered in Lambeth registration district in London during the 1st quarter of 1863. Her baptism was at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 27 September 1863 when she was living at Lower Norwood, which is in Lambeth registration district. In the census of 2 April 1871 Eliza, at the age of 8, was living with her grandparents, Charles and Phoebe Draper, in West Street at East Grinstead.

 

Edward and Caroline’s second child was Charles Walder whose birth was registered in Bethnal Green registration district in London during the 2nd quarter of 1865. In the census of 2 April 1871 Charles, at the age of 5, was living with his grandparents, Charles and Phoebe Draper, in West Street at East Grinstead. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Charles, now aged 16, was working as a bricklayer’s labourer and living with his widowed grandmother, Phoebe Draper, in West Street.

 

 

Charles and Phoebe’s fourth child was Elizabeth Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 20 August 1843. In the census of 30 March 1851 Elizabeth, at the age of 7, was living with her parents in an unnamed cottage in the countryside to the south-east of East Grinstead town. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Elizabeth, now aged 17, was a live-in servant to the family of draper and grocer David Cooper at 2 Belmont, Shirley Common and Road, Millbrook, Hampshire.

When she was about 23 years old Elizabeth married Alfred Rowe at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 5 August 1866. They were both then living in East Grinstead, and Alfred was a boot and shoe closer. They lived at East Grinstead where they had eight children born between 1866 and 1884, the second and seventh of whom died in infancy. In the census of 2 April 1871 they were living in West Street at East Grinstead with their then one child, and Alfred was still working as a boot closer. But by the time their second child was baptised in early 1873 Alfred had become an ostler, and at the baptism of their third child in 1874 Alfred was described as being an ostler at the Swan Inn.

They were still living in West Street when their sixth child was baptised in June 1880. But then in the census of 3 April 1881 they were living in Crown Yard off the High Street in East Grinstead with their then five surviving children, and Alfred was continuing to work as an ostler. Alfred was still an ostler when their seventh child was baptised in 1883. They were still living at Crown Yard when Alfred died at the age of 44; he was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 24 July 1885, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead, and his burial record describes him as late ostler at the Crown Hotel.

Elizabeth was still living in Crown Yard when her seventh child, who was described as being an imbecile, died in 1888 at the age of 5. In the census of 5 April 1891 Elizabeth was living on her own means at 2 Crown Lane in East Grinstead with her six surviving children, and she had 33-year-old bricklayer John Partridge as a lodger. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Elizabeth was living at 11 Cantelupe Road in East Grinstead with her three youngest children and her grandson, 5-year-old Victor Charles Baker. In the census of 2 April 1911 Elizabeth was living at 49 Cantelope Road in East Grinstead with her widowed eldest son, her grandson Alfred James Rowe and her nephew Charles Baker. Elizabeth was presumably keeping house for the three males who were all out at work. Elizabeth died at the age of 90 (not 89 as given on her death certificate), her death being registered in East Grinstead registration district during the 4th quarter of 1933.

 

 

 

Alfred and Elizabeth’s eldest child was Charles John Rowe who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 28 October 1866. In the census of 2 April 1871 Charles, at the age of 4, was living with his parents in West Street at East Grinstead, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Charles, now aged 14, was living with his parents in Crown Yard off the High Street in East Grinstead, and he was still going to school. In the census of 5 April 1891 Charles, at the age of 24, was working as an ostler and living with his widowed mother at 2 Crown Lane in East Grinstead. In 1897 Charles was a hotel servant when he acted as one of the executors of the will of his aunt Caroline Muddle. In the census of 2 April 1911 Charles was a widower living with his mother at 49 Cantelope Road in East Grinstead and still working as a hotel servant.

 

Alfred and Elizabeth’s second child was Alfred Rowe who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth registered during the 4th quarter of 1872. He was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 23 February 1873. Alfred died when he was only 8 months old, and he was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 2 July 1873, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead.

 

Alfred and Elizabeth’s third child was Elizabeth Ann Rowe, known as Bessie, who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised on 27 September 1874 by St Swithun’s Church at Sackville College Chapel in East Grinstead because the parish church was being repaired. In the census of 3 April 1881 Elizabeth, at the age of 6, was living with her parents in Crown Yard off the High Street in East Grinstead, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Elizabeth, now aged 16, was living with her widowed mother at 2 Crown Lane in East Grinstead.

 

Alfred and Elizabeth’s fourth child was William Rowe who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1876. In the census of 3 April 1881 William, at the age of 5, was living with his parents in Crown Yard off the High Street in East Grinstead, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 William, now aged 15, was living with his widowed mother at 2 Crown Lane in East Grinstead.

 

Alfred and Elizabeth’s fifth child was John Rowe who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 28 July 1878. In the census of 3 April 1881 John, at the age of 2, was living with his parents in Crown Yard off the High Street in East Grinstead. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 John, now aged 12, was living with his widowed mother at 2 Crown Lane in East Grinstead. In the census of 31 March 1901 John, at the age of 22, was working as a stableman and living with his mother at 11 Cantelupe Road in East Grinstead.

 

Alfred and Elizabeth’s sixth child was Caroline Rowe, known as Carrie, who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 27 June 1880. In the census of 3 April 1881 Caroline, at the age of nearly 1, was living with her parents in Crown Yard off the High Street in East Grinstead. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Elizabeth, now aged 10, was living with her widowed mother at 2 Crown Lane in East Grinstead. In the census of 31 March 1901 Caroline, at the age of 20, was working as an upholsterer and living with her mother at 11 Cantelupe Road in East Grinstead.

 

Alfred and Elizabeth’s seventh child was Albert Rowe who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1882. He was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 27 May 1883 when he was 12 months old. Albert died at East Grinstead when he was only 5 years old, and he was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 13 April 1888, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead. Albert’s burial record describes him as an ‘imbecile child’.

 

Alfred and Elizabeth’s eighth child was Benjamin Rowe who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1884. Benjamin was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 27 September 1885 when he was 15 months old. In the census of 5 April 1891 Benjamin, at the a ge of 6, was living with his widowed mother at 2 Crown Lane in East Grinstead. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Benjamin, now aged 16, was working as a wood machinist and living with his mother at 11 Cantelupe Road in East Grinstead.

 

 

Charles and Phoebe’s fifth child was Stephen Draper who was born at Croydon in Surrey, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1845. Stephen was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 30 January 1853 at the same time as his brothers George and Richard and sister Eliza. In the census of 30 March 1851 Stephen, at the age of 5, was living with his parents in an unnamed cottage in the countryside to the south-east of East Grinstead town. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Stephen, now aged 15, was living with his parents in Coopers Cottage, Chapel Street, East Grinstead, and he was working as an assistant shoemaker, presumably for his father. In the census of 2 April 1871 Stephen, at the age of 25, was living at the Sussex Arms, West Street, East Grinstead, which was run by his uncle and aunt, William and Elizabeth Wickens, and he was working as a shoemaker.

When he was 26 years old Stephen married 22-year-old Annie Mitchell at Holy Trinity Church in Forest Row on 30 September 1872. Annie was the daughter of Thomas and Ann Mitchell, and she had been baptised as Ann Mitchell at Holy Trinity Church in Forest Row on 6 October 1850. Stephen and Annie lived at East Grinstead where they had four children born between 1873 and 1878. When their first child was baptised in 1873 they were living in the High Street at East Grinstead and Stephen was a publican and shoemaker, then when their second and third children were baptised in 1875 and 1876 they were living at the Rose Inn in East Grinstead High Street and Stephen was a publican.

In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at the Sussex Arms with their four children; Stephen was now the innkeeper there and they had 34-year-old John Post as a live-in ostler. Then when their fourth child was baptised in early 1882 they were living at the Swan Inn, London Road, East Grinstead where Stephen was publican. Stephen was still the innkeeper at the Swan Inn when he died at the age of 39 (not 38 as given on his burial record); he was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 27 May 1885 in plot 531 of Queens Street Cemetery in East Grinstead.

In the census of 5 April 1891 Annie was the landlady at the Swan Inn where she was living with her three youngest children and two live-in servants, John Post who was now 44-years-old and a potman, and 19-year-old general domestic servant Lily Isted. Annie then had five boarders and one visitor staying at the inn. Annie was still the landlady at the Swan Inn when she died at the age of 43, and was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 24 December 1893, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead.

 

 

 

Stephen and Anne’s eldest child was Annie Lily Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 31 August 1873. In the census of 3 April 1881 Annie, at the age of 7, was living with her parents at the Sussex Arms, West Street, East Grinstead, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Annie, now aged 17, was a live-in parlour maid to spinster Frances Pusey at 2 Baldwin Crescent, Camberwell, London.

 

Stephen and Anne’s second child was Arthur Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 28 February 1875. In the census of 3 April 1881 Arthur, at the age of 6, was living with his parents at the Sussex Arms, West Street, East Grinstead, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Arthur, now aged 16, was working as a plumber’s apprentice and living with his widowed mother at the Swan Inn, London Road, East Grinstead.

 

Stephen and Anne’s third child was Clara Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 24 September 1876. In the census of 3 April 1881 Clara, at the age of 4, was living with her parents at the Sussex Arms, West Street, East Grinstead, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Clara, now aged 14, was working as a monitress at school and living with her widowed mother at the Swan Inn, London Road, East Grinstead.

 

Stephen and Anne’s fourth child was George Searle Cecil Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1878. Cecil was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 12 February 1882 when he was 3 years old. In the census of 3 April 1881 George, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at the Sussex Arms, West Street, East Grinstead. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 George, now aged 12, was living with his widowed mother at the Swan Inn, London Road, East Grinstead.

 

 

Charles and Phoebe’s sixth child was George Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1848. George was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 30 January 1853 at the same time as his brothers Stephen and Richard and sister Eliza. In the census of 30 March 1851 George, the age of 3, was living with his parents in an unnamed cottage in the countryside to the south-east of East Grinstead town. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 George, now aged 13, was living with his parents in Coopers Cottage, Chapel Street, East Grinstead, and he was going to school. In the census of 2 April 1871 George, at the age of 23, was working as a carpenter and living with his parents at West Street in East Grinstead.

When he was about 26 years old George married 20-year-old Sarah Hollamby in Tonbridge registration district in Kent during the 1st quarter of 1874. Sarah was the daughter of John and Sarah Hollamby, and her birth had been registered in St Luke registration district in London during the 2nd quarter of 1853. George and Sarah lived at East Grinstead and had ten children born between 1875 and 1897, three of whom died in infancy. All these children were born at East Grinstead except the fourth who was born at Horley in Surrey during 1881. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living in West Street at East Grinstead with their then two surviving children, and George was a carpenter.

From December 1886, when their sixth child was baptised, to March 1893, when their eighth child was baptised, they are recorded as living at 70 West Street, which was also known as 4 Pirie’s Place or 1 Pirie’s Terrace. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at 70 West Street with their now five surviving children, and they also had George’s widowed sister-in-law, Sarah Draper, and her three children living with them. They were still living at 70 West Street when their eighth child died in March 1893 when only 18 days old. In the census of 31 March 1901 they were living at 66 West Street with their six youngest surviving children, and George was continuing to work as a carpenter. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 they were still living at 66 West Street, now with just three of their sons, who were young working adults, still at home; and George was working as a carpenter for a builder.

George died in East Grinstead Cottage Hospital on 16 February 1927, at the age of 78, as a result of the injuries he received when he was knocked down by a van while walking home from the Sussex Arms in thick fog on the evening of 11 February 1927. He was buried in section 1U, grave 80 of Mount Noddy Cemetery in East Grinstead. Four years later Sarah was still living at 66 West Street when she died there at the age of 78, and she was buried with her husband in Mount Noddy Cemetery on 11 June 1931.

 

 

 

George and Sarah’s eldest child was Walter Draper who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1875. Walter was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 28 July 1878 when he was 3 years old, at the same time as his younger brother Charles. In the census of 3 April 1881 Walter, at the age of 5, was living with his parents in West Street at East Grinstead, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Walter, now aged 15, was working as a painter and living with his parents at 70 West Street.

 

George and Sarah’s second child was Charles John Draper who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1878. Charles was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 28 July 1878. Charles died when he was only 1ľ years old, and he was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 2 October 1879, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead.

 

George and Sarah’s third child was George Draper who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1879. George was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 14 March 1890 when he was 10 years old, at the same time as three of his brothers. In the census of 3 April 1881 George, at the age of 18 months, was living with his parents in West Street at East Grinstead. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 George, now aged 11, was living with his parents at 70 West Street, and he was going to school. In the census of 31 March 1901 George, at the age of 21, was working as a carpenter and living with his parents at 66 West Street.

 

George and Sarah’s fourth child was Arthur Draper who was born at Horley in Surrey, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1881. Arthur was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 14 March 1890 when he was 8 years old, at the same time as three of his brothers. In the census of 5 April 1891 Arthur, at the age of 9, was living with his parents at 70 West Street in East Grinstead, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Arthur, now aged 19, was working as a plasterer and living with his parents at 66 West Street.

 

George and Sarah’s fifth child was Albert Henry Draper who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1884. Albert was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 14 March 1890 when he was 6 years old, at the same time as three of his brothers. In the census of 5 April 1891 Albert, at the age of 7, was living with his parents at 70 West Street in East Grinstead, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Albert, now aged 17, was working as an errand boy and living with his parents at 66 West Street. In the census of 2 April 1911 Albert, at the age of 27, was working as a plasterer and still living with his parents at 66 West Street.

 

George and Sarah’s sixth child was Stephen Draper who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and privately baptised by St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 6 December 1886. Stephen died the following day, 7 December 1886, when he was only 48 hours old, and he was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 11 December 1886, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead.

 

George and Sarah’s seventh child was William Alfred Draper who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1889. William was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 14 March 1890 when he was 6 months old, at the same time as three of his brothers. In the census of 5 April 1891 William, at the age of 1, was living with his parents at 70 West Street in East Grinstead. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 William, now aged 11, was living with his parents at 66 West Street. In the census of 2 April 1911 William, at the age of 21, was working as a stationary shop assistant and still living with his parents at 66 West Street.

 

George and Sarah’s eighth child was Richard Draper who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and privately baptised by St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 17 March 1893. Richard died at 70 West Street in East Grinstead when he was only 18 days old, and he was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 23 March 1893, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead.

 

George and Sarah’s ninth child was Edward Draper who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1894. In the census of 31 March 1901 Edward, at the age of 7, was living with his parents at 66 West Street. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Edward, now aged 17, was working as a stationary shop assistant and still living with his parents at 66 West Street.

 

George and Sarah’s tenth child was Percy Cass Draper who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1897. In the census of 31 March 1901 Percy, at the age of 3, was living with his parents at 66 West Street.

 

 

Charles and Phoebe’s seventh child was Richard Draper who was born at East Grinstead in late 1850, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 30 January 1853, at the same time as his brothers Stephen and George and sister Eliza. In the census of 30 March 1851 Richard, at the age of 4 months, was living with his parents in an unnamed cottage in the countryside to the south-east of East Grinstead town. Richard died when he was only 3 years old, and he was buried in St Swithun’s Churchyard on 14 September 1854.

 

Charles and Phoebe’s eighth child was Eliza Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 30 January 1853. In the census of 7 April 1861 Eliza, at the age of 8, was staying with her grandmother, Elizabeth Muddle, at Chapel Street in East Grinstead, and she was going to school. In the census of 2 April 1871 Eliza, now aged 18, was a live-in housemaid to the family of draper and grocer Charles Sawyer in East Grinstead High Street.

When she was 21 years old Eliza married 21-year-old Frank Lindfield at Holy Trinity Church in Forest Row on 26 December 1873. Frank was then a bricklayer living at Forest Row and Eliza was living at East Grinstead. Frank was the son of blacksmith Josiah Lindfield and his wife Jane; Frank had been born at Fletching and his birth registered during the 2nd quarter of 1852.

Frank and Eliza lived at Forest Row where they had eight known children born between 1874 and 1896, the first of whom died when only a few months old. From at least 1878 to 1887 they were living at Ashurst Wood in Forest Row Parish. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at Ashurst Wood with their then two surviving children; Frank was continuing to work as a bricklayer and they had Frank’s brother George living with them. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at 5 Prospect Cottages in Forest Row their now five surviving children, and Frank was now a plasterer. In the census of 31 March 1901 they were living at 7 Phoenix Terrace in Forest Row with six of their children, and Frank was back to being a bricklayer. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at 1 Ye Firs in Ashurst Wood near Forest Row with just two of their children still living at home, and Frank was working as a bricklayer for a builder. In this census they stated that they'd had twelve children of which seven were still living so they must have had four more children who died young and were not recorded in censuses.

Frank died at the age of 61, his death being registered in East Grinstead registration district during the 2nd quarter of 1913. Thirteen years later Eliza died at the age of 73 (not 72 as given on her death certificate), her death being registered in Brighton registration district in Sussex during the 3rd quarter of 1926.

 

 

 

Frank and Eliza’s eldest known child was Alfred Lindfield who born at Forest Row, and privately baptised by Holy Trinity Church in Forest Row on 14 March 1874, then admitted into the church on 26 July 1874. Alfred died when only a few months old, his death being registered in East Grinstead registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1874.

 

Frank and Eliza’s second known child was Josiah Lindfield who born at Forest Row, and baptised at Holy Trinity Church in Forest Row on 26 May 1878. In the census of 3 April 1881 Josiah, at the age of 3, was living with his parents at Ashurst Wood in Forest Row Parish. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Josiah, now aged 13, was working as a milkboy and living with his parents at 5 Prospect Cottages in Forest Row. In the census of 31 March 1901 Josiah, at the age of 23, was working as a bricklayer and living with his parents at 7 Phoenix Terrace in Forest Row.

 

Frank and Eliza’s third known child was Harry Lindfield who born at Forest Row, and baptised at Holy Trinity Church in Forest Row on 11 July 1880. In the census of 3 April 1881 Josiah, at the age of 11 months, was living with his parents at Ashurst Wood in Forest Row Parish. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Harry, now aged 10, was living with his parents at 5 Prospect Cottages in Forest Row, and he was going to school.

 

Frank and Eliza’s fourth known child was Sarah Jane Lindfield who born at Forest Row, and baptised at Holy Trinity Church in Forest Row on 25 November 1883. In the census of 5 April 1891 Sarah, a t the age of 7, was living with her parents at 5 Prospect Cottages in Forest Row, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Sarah, now aged 17, was working as a housemaid and living with her parents at 7 Phoenix Terrace in Forest Row.

 

Frank and Eliza’s fifth known child was Kate Lindfield who born at Forest Row, and baptised at Holy Trinity Church in Forest Row on 17 April 1887. In the census of 5 April 1891 Kate, at the age of 4, was living with her parents at 5 Prospect Cottages in Forest Row, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Kate, now aged 14, was living with her parents at 7 Phoenix Terrace in Forest Row.

 

Frank and Eliza’s sixth known child was Lizzie May Lindfield who born at Forest Row, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1890. In the census of 5 April 1891 Lizzie, at the age of 9 months, was living with her parents at 5 Prospect Cottages in Forest Row. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Lizzie, now aged 10, was living with her parents at 7 Phoenix Terrace in Forest Row. In the census of 2 April 1911 Lizzie, at the age of 20, was working as a domestic cook and living with her parents at 1 Ye Firs in Ashurst Wood near Forest Row.

 

Frank and Eliza’s seventh known child was Alice Emily Lindfield who born at Forest Row, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1892. In the census of 31 March 1901 Alice, at the age of 8, was living with her parents at 7 Phoenix Terrace in Forest Row.

 

Frank and Eliza’s eighth known child was Albert Arthur Lindfield who born at Forest Row, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1896. In the census of 31 March 1901 Albert, at the age of 5, was living with his parents at 7 Phoenix Terrace in Forest Row. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Albert, now aged 15, was working as a domestic gardener and living with his parents at 1 Ye Firs in Ashurst Wood near Forest Row.

 

 

Charles and Phoebe’s ninth child was William Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 29 April 1855. In the census of 7 April 1861 William, at the age of 6, was living with his parents in Coopers Cottage, Chapel Street, East Grinstead, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 William, now aged 16, was working as a labourer and living with his parents at West Street in East Grinstead. In the census of 3 April 1881 William, at the age of 26, was now working as a plasterer and living with his widowed mother in West Street.

When he was 28 years old William married 21-year-old Caroline Harding in Brighton registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1883. Caroline was the daughter of Robert and Emma Harding; she had been born at Edenbridge in Kent, and her birth registered during the 4th quarter of 1862. William and Caroline had seven children born at East Grinstead between 1884 and 1902. At the baptisms of two of their children in 1885 and 1890 they were described as living 'Back of West Street'. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at Bramble Cottages in West Street with their then three children, and William was continuing to work as a plasterer. Living next-door in the other half of Bramble Cottages were the family of William's brother Charles and William's mother. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 William and Caroline were living at Bramble Cottages with their six children, and William was continuing to work as a plasterer. In the census of 2 April 1911 were living at Bramble Cottages with their six of their children and a grandson, and William was still working as a plasterer.

Caroline died at 46 Queens Road in East Grinstead at the age of 82, and she was buried in section 2U, grave 141 of Mount Noddy Cemetery in East Grinstead during the 4th quarter of 1944. Only a few weeks later William died at 98 Railway Approach in East Grinstead at the age of 89, and he was buried with his wife in section 2U, grave 141 of Mount Noddy Cemetery during the 1st quarter of 1945.

 

 

William and Caroline’s eldest child was Alice Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1884. Alice was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 27 September 1885. In the census of 5 April 1891 Alice, at the age of 6, was living with her parents at Bramble Cottages, West Street, East Grinstead. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Alice, now aged 16, was continuing to live with her parents at Bramble Cottages. In the census of 2 April 1911 Alice, at the age of 26, was working as a laundry maid and still living with her parents at Bramble Cottages.

 

William and Caroline’s second child was Edith Helena Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1887. In the census of 5 April 1891 Edith, at the age of 3, was living with her parents at Bramble Cottages, West Street, East Grinstead. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Edith, now aged 13, was continuing to live with her parents at Bramble Cottages. In the census of 2 April 1911 Edith, at the age of 23, was working as a laundry maid and still living with her parents at Bramble Cottages.

 

William and Caroline’s third child was Annie Phoebe Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1890 under the name of just Annie. She was baptised with the name Phoebe Annie by St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 31 August 1890. In the census of 5 April 1891 Annie, at the age of 1, was living with her parents at Bramble Cottages, West Street, East Grinstead. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Annie, now aged 11, was continuing to live with her parents at Bramble Cottages.

 

William and Caroline’s fourth child was William Clement Draper who was born at East Grinstead on 23 November 1892, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 26 April 1893. In the census of 31 March 1901 William, at the age of 8, was living with his parents at Bramble Cottages, West Street, East Grinstead. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 William, now aged 18, was working as an upholsterer and continuing to live with his parents at Bramble Cottages.

 

William and Caroline’s fifth child was Emma Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1895. In the census of 31 March 1901 Emma, at the age of 5, was living with her parents at Bramble Cottages, West Street, East Grinstead. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Emma, now aged 15, was continuing to live with her parents at Bramble Cottages.

 

William and Caroline’s sixth child was Charles Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1899. In the census of 31 March 1901 Charles, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at Bramble Cottages, West Street, East Grinstead. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Charles, now aged 12, was going to school and continuing to live with his parents at Bramble Cottages.

 

William and Caroline’s seventh child was Caroline Frances M Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1902. In the census of 2 April 1911 Caroline, at the age of 8, was living with her parents at Bramble Cottages, West Street, East Grinstead.

 

 

Charles and Phoebe’s tenth child was Charles Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 27 September 1857. In the census of 7 April 1861 Charles, at the age of 3, was living with his parents in Coopers Cottage, Chapel Street, East Grinstead. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Charles, now aged 13, was living with his parents in West Street at East Grinstead. In the census of 3 April 1881 Charles, at the age of 23, was working as a gardener and living with his widowed mother in West Street.

When he was 25 years old Charles married 22-year-old Mary Ann Whyte at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 16 June 1883. They were both then living in East Grinstead, and Charles was still working as a gardener. Mary Ann was the daughter of William and Elizabeth Whyte (or White), and she had been baptised at St Swithun’s Church on 31 March 1861.

Charles and Mary Ann had six children born at East Grinstead between 1884 and 1897, two of whom died in infancy and one as a 12-year-old child. When their second child died in 1886 they were living at the ‘Back of West Street’ and Charles was a grocer’s porter, then when their fourth child was baptised in 1890 they were living at Bramble Cottages in West Street and Charles was a gardener. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at Bramble Cottages with their then three surviving children, and Charles was a grocer’s porter. Living with them were Charles’ mother and a lodger, and the family of Charles’ brother William was living next-door in the other half of Bramble Cottages.

They were living at Bramble Cottages at the back of West Street and Charles was described as being a carman when their eldest son was buried in May 1896. In August 1897 Charles was described as a grocer’s porter when he acted as one of the executors of the will of his aunt Caroline Muddle, but the same month when his fifth child was baptised he was described as a gardener living at 50 West Street. In the census of 31 March 1901 Charles and Mary Ann were living at 50 West Street with their three surviving children, and Charles was a gardener. It seems that Charles must have had two jobs, working as both a grocer’s porter and a gardener at the same time, and the grocer’s porter job probably also involved him being a carman to make deliveries. In the census of 2 April 1911 they were still living at 50 West Street, now with two of their children and a nephew, 34-year-old Alfred John Draper, and Charles was a jobbing gardener.

They were living at 42 West Street when Mary Ann died there at the age of 75, and was buried in section 2U, grave 30 of Mount Noddy Cemetery in East Grinstead on 13 June 1936. Three years later Charles was still a gardener when he died at 46 Portland Road in East Grinstead at the age of 81, and was buried with his wife in section 2U, grave 30 of Mount Noddy Cemetery in East Grinstead on 12 June 1939.

 

 

Charles and Mary Ann’s eldest child was Edwin Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1884. In the census of 5 April 1891 Edwin, at the age of 6, was living with his parents at Bramble Cottages, West Street, East Grinstead. Edwin died at the age of 12, and he was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 8 May 1896, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead.

 

Charles and Mary Ann’s second child was William Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1885. William died when only 11 months old, and he was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 8 July 1886, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead.

 

Charles and Mary Ann’s third child was Maud Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1886. In the census of 5 April 1891 Maud, at the age of 4, was living with her parents at Bramble Cottages, West Street, East Grinstead. Then in the census of 31 March 19 01 Maud, now aged 14, was living with her parents at 50 West Street in East Grinstead.

 

Charles and Mary Ann’s fourth child was Elizabeth Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1890. In the census of 5 April 1891 Elizabeth, at the age of 9 months, was living with her parents at Bramble Cottages, West Street, East Grinstead. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Elizabeth, now aged 10, was living with her parents at 50 West Street in East Grinstead. In the census of 2 April 1911 Elizabeth, at the age of 20, was working as a laundry maid and still living with her parents at 50 West Street.

 

Charles and Mary Ann’s fifth child was Ernest Draper who was born at East Grinstead, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1895. In the census of 31 March 1901 Ernest, at the age of 5, was living with his parents at 50 West Street in East Grinstead. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Ernest, now aged 15, was working as a telegraph messenger boy and continuing to live with his parents at 50 West Street.

 

Charles and Mary Ann’s sixth child was Phoebe Draper who was born at East Grinstead on 1 July 1897 , and privately baptised by St Swithun’s Church on 29 August 1897. Phoebe died when she was only 2 months old, and she was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 3 September 1897, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead.

 

 

Stephen and Elizabeth’s third child was Mary Muddle who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 4 December 1814. Mary attended the Zion Chapel Sunday School in East Grinstead.[10] In the census of 28 May 1821 Mary, at the age of 6, was living with her parents in the Town Division of East Grinstead. Mary died at East Grinstead, at the age of 11 (not 10 as given on her burial record), and she was buried in St Swithun's Churchyard at East Grinstead on 13 December 1825 at the same time as her father was buried there.

 

Stephen and Elizabeth’s fourth child was Stephen Muddle who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun's Church in East Grinstead on 2 February 1817. In the census of 28 May 1821 Stephen, at the age of 4, was living with his parents in the Town Division of East Grinstead. Stephen started to attend the Zion Chapel Sunday School in East Grinstead during the 26 May 1822 to 24 May 1823 school year when he would have been 5 to 6 years old. He continued to attend the Sunday School until the 18 July 1824 when he moved to the Church School.[11] In the census of 30 May 1831 Stephen, now aged 14, was not living with his widowed mother in the Town Division of East Grinstead. Then in the census of 6 June 1841 Stephen, at the age of 24, was working as a farm labourer and living with his widowed mother in Chapel Lane at East Grinstead. Stephen never married. He died at East Grinstead at the age of 27 (not 24 as given on his burial record), and he was buried in St Swithun's Churchyard at East Grinstead on 30 December 1844.

 

Stephen and Elizabeth’s fifth child was Elizabeth Muddle who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 31 January 1819. Elizabeth attended the Zion Chapel Sunday School in East Grinstead.[12] In the census of 28 May 1821 Elizabeth, at the age of 2, was living with her parents in the Town Division of East Grinstead, and then in the census of 30 May 1831 Elizabeth, now aged 12, was living with her widowed mother in the Town Division of East Grinstead.

When she was 23 years old Elizabeth married William Wicking at St Mary's Church in Horne, Surrey on 26 September 1842. They were both then living in Horne and William was working as a sawyer. William was the son of James Wicking and he had been born at Lingfield in Surrey in about 1814. William spelt his surname as Wicking at his marriage and in the 1851 and 1861 censuses but by the 1871 census it was being spelt Wickens. It's thought that William and Elizabeth probably didn't have any children. In the census of 30 March 1851 William was working as a sawyer and living at Dormans Land, Lingfield, Surrey; Elizabeth was staying with her widowed mother in an unnamed house in the countryside to the south-east of East Grinstead town, and she was working as a dressmaker. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 William and Elizabeth were living at Dormans Land and William was continuing to work as a sawyer.

In the census of 2 April 1871 William and Elizabeth were living at the Sussex Arms, West Street, East Grinstead, where William was the beerhouse keeper; they had Elizabeth’s brother William Muddle, sister Caroline Muddle, nephew Stephen Draper, and six lodgers staying with them. William died at the age of 64, and he was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 11 July 1879, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead. In the census of 3 April 1881 Elizabeth was a general dealer living in West Street, and she had her spinster sister Caroline Muddle living with her. Ten years after William’s death Elizabeth had been living at the ‘Back of West Street’ when she died in the Union Workhouse at East Grinstead, at the age of 70. She was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 13 April 1889 in plot 577 of Queens Street Cemetery in East Grinstead.

 

 

Stephen and Elizabeth’s sixth child was Lucy Muddle who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun's Church in East Grinstead on 1 April 1821. In the census of 28 May 1821 Lucy, only a few weeks old, was living with her parents in the Town Division of East Grinstead, and then in the census of 30 May 1831 Lucy, now aged 10, was living with her widowed mother in the Town Division of East Grinstead. In the census of 6 June 1841 Lucy, at the age of 20, was living with her widowed mother at Chapel Lane in East Grinstead. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Lucy, at the age of 30, was living with her mother in an unnamed house in the countryside to the south-east of East Grinstead town, and she was working as a nurse.

Lucy was living at Hever in Kent when, at the age of 37, she married 46-year-old labourer James Hewett/Simmons at St Peter’s Church in Hever on 21 November 1858. At their marriage James gave his age as 33, his surname as Hewett, and the name of his father as Hugh Simmons. James had been baptised at St Mary the Virgin Church in Hartfield on 29 September 1812 as the illegitimate son of Alice Hewett who then married widower Hugh Simmonds at St Mary the Virgin Church in Hartfield on 6 November 1815. James and Lucy always used the name Simmons during their married life. It's thought that James and Lucy most probably didn't have any children.

In the census of 7 April 1861 James was working as a farm labourer and lodging with the family of farm labourer Thomas Gibbs in Mill Lane at East Grinstead; Lucy was than staying with her widowed mother at Chapel Lane (now called Chapel Street) in East Grinstead, and she was described as being a labourer’s wife. In the census of 2 April 1871 James and Lucy were living in a cottage at Saint Hill in East Grinstead, and James was continuing to work as a farm labourer. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 they were still living at Saint Hill; James was still a farm labourer and they had 26-year-old farm labourer Thomas Young as a boarder. They were living at Saint Hill Green when Lucy died at the age of 62, and was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 29 November 1883, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead. In the census of 5 April 1891 James was continuing to live at Saint Hill; he was now working as a gardener and had 78-year-old widow Mary Agent living with him as his housekeeper. Later that year James died at the age of 78, and he was buried by St Swithun’s Church on 15 August 1891, probably in Queens Street Cemetery at East Grinstead.

 

Stephen and Elizabeth’s seventh child was William Muddle who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun's Church in East Grinstead on 20 April 1823. In the census of 30 May 1831 William, at the age of 8, was living with his widowed mother in the Town Division of East Grinstead. Then in the census of 6 June 1841 William, now aged 18, was living with his widowed mother at Chapel Lane in East Grinstead.

When he was about 27 years old William married 22-year-old Ann Sargent at St Luke’s Church, Norwood, Surrey on 11 February 1851. Ann was the daughter of John and Sarah Serjeant; she had been born at Castor in Northamptonshire, and baptised at St Kyneburgha Church in Castor on 25 May 1828.

William and Ann didn’t have any children. In the census of 30 March 1851 they were living with unmarried solicitor Alfred G Blake at 23 George Street, Croydon, Surrey; Ann, who was described as being a servant, was presumably working for Alfred Blake, and William was working as shoemaker. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 they were living at 21 Surrey Street in Brighton; William was continuing to work as a shoemaker and Ann was now a dressmaker. They were looking after two nurse-children, 3-year-old Mary Lynch and 2-year-old Stephen Lynch, who had both been born in Swansea, Wales.

Ann died at East Grinstead at the age of 36 (not 33 as given on her burial record), and she was buried in St Swithun’s Churchyard at East Grinstead on 22 July 1864. In the census of 2 April 1871 William was still a shoemaker and now living at the Sussex Arms, West Street, East Grinstead, which was run by his sister Elizabeth’s husband, William Wickens. William had still been a shoemaker living at West Street when he died in East Grinstead Union Workhouse at the age of 54; he was buried by St Swithun’s Church in plot 578 of Queens Street Cemetery in East Grinstead on 12 October 1877.

 

Stephen and Elizabeth’s eighth child was Caroline Muddle who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun's Church in East Grinstead on 20 February 1825. In the census of 30 May 1831 Caroline, at the age of 6, was living with her widowed mother in the Town Division of East Grinstead. Then in the census of 6 June 1841 Caroline, now aged 16, was living with her widowed mother at Chapel Lane in East Grinstead; she was also recorded in this census as staying with John and Jane Firminger at another house in Chapel Lane.

Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Caroline was a live-in servant for the family of innkeeper John Brooker at the Swan Inn, London Road, East Grinstead. In the census of 7 April 1861 Caroline was still a live-in house servant at the Swan Inn, which was now run by John Brooker’s widow Charlotte.

In the census of 2 April 1871 Caroline was living at the Sussex Arms, West Street, East Grinstead, which was run by her sister Elizabeth’s husband William Wickens; Charlotte was not recorded as having any occupation, but it’s thought that she may have been working for William as a barmaid. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Caroline was living with her now widowed sister Elizabeth Wickens in West Street at East Grinstead, and Caroline was described as being an annuitant. In the census of 5 April 1891 Caroline was living by herself in two rooms in Back Road off West Street, and she was now described as being a retired barmaid.

Caroline never married, and she had still been living in West Street when she died at Westminster Hospital in London on 8 April 1897, at the age of 72. She was buried by St Swithun’s Church in plot 591 of Queens Street Cemetery in East Grinstead on 14 April 1897. Probate of Caroline’s will was granted to her nephew Charles Draper, and Charles Rowe, who was the son of her niece Elizabeth Rowe, at London Probate Registry on 7 August 1897, and valued her effects at Ł140 8s 11d.

 

 

 

Thomas and Elizabeth’s fifth child was Caroline Muddle who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 3 May 1794. When she was 21 years old Caroline married 23-year-old George Harman at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 11 June 1815. George was the son of John and Sarah Harman, and he had been baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 13 May 1792.

George and Caroline lived at East Grinstead where they had four children; the first three were born in 1816, 1816 and 1820, and at their baptisms George was recorded as being a labourer. In the census of 28 May 1821 they were living in the Town Division of East Grinstead in a house occupied by two families headed by George Harman and another, both employed in agriculture; with the families consisting of three males and three females. The three females would have been George's wife Caroline and their two daughters, Elizabeth and Harriet. Two of the three males would have been George and his son William, with the other male probably being a lodger, who was considered a separate family. George and Caroline's fourth child was born in 1822 when they were living on East Grinstead Common and George was continuing to work as a labourer. The year after the birth of their fourth child Caroline died at the age of 29, and she was buried in St Swithun's Churchyard at East Grinstead on 25 August 1823.

Four years after Caroline’s death George, at the age of 35, married Sophia Evershed at St Mary’s Church in Walton-on-Thames, Surrey on 27 May 1827. They had three children; the first born at Cranleigh in Surrey in 1827 and the other two at Godalming in Surrey in 1830 and 1833. Sophia had died by the time of the census of 6 June 1841 as George was then a widower living in Bridge Street at Godalming with his six youngest children, and he was working as a farm labourer. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 George was living with his two sons George and James in Bridge Street at Godalming, and they were all working as farm labourers. In the census of 7 April 1861 George was living with his daughter Mary Ann in Bridge Street, and he was working as a carter. George died at the age of 72, his death being registered in Guildford registration district, which includes Godalming, during the 4th quarter of 1864.

 

 

George and Caroline’s eldest child was Elizabeth Harman who was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 7 January 1816. In the census of 28 May 1821 Elizabeth, at the age of 5, was living with her parents in the Town Division of East Grinstead.

 

George and Caroline’s second child was Harriet Harman who was baptised at St Swithun's Church in East Grinstead on 8 February 1818. In the census of 28 May 1821 Harriet, at the age of 3, was living with her parents in the Town Division of East Grinstead. Then in the census of 6 June 1841 Harriet, at the age of 23, was living with her widowed father and her five younger siblings in Bridge Street, Godalming, Surrey, and she was probably acting as their housekeeper.

 

George and Caroline’s third child was William Harman who was baptised at St Swithun's Church in East Grinstead on 16 April 1820. In the census of 28 May 1821 William, at the age of 1, was living with his parents in the Town Division of East Grinstead. Then in the census of 6 June 1841 William, at the age of 21, was working as a farm labourer and living with his widowed father and five of his siblings in Bridge Street, Godalming, Surrey.

 

George and Caroline’s fourth child was George Harman who was baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 27 October 1822. In the census of 6 June 1841 George, at the age of 18, was working as a farm labourer and living with his widowed father and five of his siblings in Bridge Street, Godalming, Surrey. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 George, now aged 28, was working as a farm labourer and living with his widowed father and brother James in Bridge Street at Godalming.

 

George and Sophia’s eldest child (George’s fifth) was James Harman who was baptised at St Nicholas Church in Cranleigh, Surrey on 4 November 1827. In the census of 6 June 1841 James, at the age of 13, was living with his widowed father and five of his siblings in Bridge Street, Godalming, Surrey. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 James, now aged 23, was working as a farm labourer and living with his widowed father and brother George in Bridge Street at Godalming.

 

George and Sophia’s second child (George’s sixth) was Edmund Harman who was baptised at St Peter and St Paul Church in Godalming, Surrey on 25 July 1830. In the census of 6 June 1841 Edmund, at the age of 11, was living with his widowed father and five of his siblings in Bridge Street at Godalming.

 

George and Sophia’s third child (George’s seventh) was Mary Ann Harman who was baptised at St Peter and St Paul Church in Godalming, Surrey on 10 March 1833. In the census of 6 June 1841 Mary Ann, at the age of 8, was living with her widowed father and five of her siblings in Bridge Street at Godalming. In the census of 7 April 1861 Mary Ann, at the age of 28, was working as a dressmaker and living with her widowed father in Bridge Street at Godalming.

 

 

Thomas and Elizabeth’s sixth child was William Muddle who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 11 August 1797. When he was about 22 years old William married Rachael Ouzman, who was about 20 years old, at St Swithun's Church in East Grinstead on 29 July 1819. They had one child, a daughter, born at East Grinstead less than three months later, and at her baptism William was described as being a servant. Then seven months after their marriage William died at East Grinstead at the age of 22 (not 21 as given on his burial record), and he was buried in St Swithun's Churchyard at East Grinstead on 1 March 1820. In the census of 28 May 1821 Rachael and her daughter were living with the family of her brother-in-law Stephen Muddle in the Town Division of East Grinstead. It's thought that Rachael's family lived at Sydenham near Lewisham in Kent (now part of London) and that sometime after the 1821 census Rachael and her daughter went there to live. Then six years after William's death Rachael died at Sydenham at the age of 27, and she was buried in the Churchyard of St Mary in Lewisham High Street on 7 June 1826.

 

 

William and Rachael’s only child was Caroline Muddle who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun's Church in East Grinstead on 24 October 1819. Her father died in 1820 and in the census of 28 May 1821 Caroline, at the age of 1, was living with her mother in the home of her father's brother Stephen Muddle in the Town Division of East Grinstead. It's thought that sometime later Caroline and her mother probably went to live with some of her mother's relatives at Sydenham near Lewisham where Caroline's mother died in 1826 leaving Caroline an orphan at the age of 6.

In the census of 6 June 1841 Caroline, at the age of 21, was a live-in servant to lodging house keeper Mary Anne Cate at Preston Street in Brighton. Then on 14 January 1843, when she was 23 years old, Caroline had and illegitimate son born at North Weald Bassett near Epping in Essex. When she registered this birth 15 days later, on 29 January 1843, Caroline was living at 34 Wellclose Square, St George's East, Middlesex (now Tower Hamlets, London). This son died at Lambourne in Essex when only 9 months old. Then in 1849, when she was 30 years old, Caroline had another illegitimate son born in the Corporate Co Union (Epping Union Workhouse) at Theydon Garnon near Epping in Essex. In the census of 30 March 1851 Caroline, unmarried at the age of 31, was staying with her uncle and aunt, John and Ann Waters, who were lodging house keepers at 34/35 Wellclose Square, Tower Hamlets, Middlesex. John Waters had married Ann Ouzman at St Mary's Church, Lewisham, Kent on 20 May 1815, so Ann was probably a sister of Caroline's mother.

Caroline married George Waters or possibly just lived with him as no marriage has been found. George was the son of William and Elizabeth Waters; he had been born at West Acre in Norfolk on 12 September 1811, and baptised at All Saints Church in West Acre on 22 September 1811. George was also the nephew of John and Ann Waters, and had been staying with them at the time of the 1851 census as Caroline had been. In the census of 7 April 1861 George and Caroline were living at 9 Montague Place, Poplar, London with Caroline’s surviving illegitimate son Edmund; George was a boarding house keeper and they then had one lodger. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 George and Caroline were living at 38 Chippenham Terrace, Paddington, London, and George was now a horse keeper. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at 4 Woodfield Place in Paddington, and George was working as a general labourer.

Caroline died at the age of 65, her death being registered in Paddington registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1885. Three years later George died at the age of 77 (not 79 as given on his death certificate), his death being registered in Paddington registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1888.

 

 

 

Caroline’s first illegitimate child was Henry Muddle who was born at Weald Gullet in North Weald Bassett near Epping in Essex on 14 January 1843. Henry died at Lambourne in Essex on 12 October 1843 from diseased bowels, when only 9 months old, and he was buried in St Mary & All Saints Churchyard at Lambourne on 14 October 1843. Henry death was registered by Mary Smith who was present at his death at Lambourne. It seems likely that this Mary Smith was the wife of Francis Smith who was living at Lambourne in 1843, and who in the census of 1851 had Henry’s younger brother Edmund as a nurse child. So had they also taken Henry in as a nurse child and were they in someway related to Henry’s mother?

 

Caroline’s second illegitimate child was Edmund Muddle who was born in the Corporate Co Union (Epping Union Workhouse) at Theydon Garnon near Epping in Essex on 9 November 1849. In the census of 30 March 1851 Edmund, at the age of 1, was a nurse child (foster child) living with the family of cordwainer Francis Smith and his wife Mary at Gullett in North Weald Bassett near Epping in Essex.

Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Edmund, at the age of 11, and with the surname Waters, was recorded living with his mother and her husband, George Waters, at 9 Montague Place, Poplar, London, and going to school. But it’s thought possible that Edmund had been ‘adopted’ by Francis and Mary Smith with whom he was a nurse child in 1851 and had taken the name Edward Smith. Because it’s thought to also be him who is shown as the 11-year old schoolboy son, Edward Smith, of Francis and Mary Smith in the same census of 7 April 1861 in Gullett Road at North Weald Bassett. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Edward Smith, at the age of 21, was a live-in groom to Innkeeper John Bambridge at the Sun & Whalebone in Latton near Harlow in Essex. John Bambridge was probably also a stable owner as he employed six grooms and two jockeys.

This is a confusing situation, but there doesn’t seem to be any registration of the birth of an Edward Smith in Epping registration district that could be Francis and Mary’s son, and possibly Edmund was just visiting his mother on census night in 1861 and Francis and Mary recorded him as their son even though he was not actually with them on census night.

 

 

Thomas and Elizabeth’s seventh child was George Muddle who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, and baptised at St Swithun’s Church in East Grinstead on 20 December 1801. George started to attend the Zion Chapel Sunday School in East Grinstead on the 11 April 1813 when he was 11 years old. The school had only open two years before, on 2 June 1811 . He continued to attend the school until the school year of 22 May 1815 to 19 May 1816 when he would have been 14 to 15 years old.[13] In the census of 28 May 1821 George, at the age of 19, was living with the family of his elder brother Stephen Muddle in the Town Division of East Grinstead.


[1] The poem is in a local directory held by East Grinstead Library.

[2] ESRO QO/42 Sussex Quarter Sessions Order Book &

      N Pilbeam & I Nelson Mid Sussex Poor Law Records 1601-1835 SRS Vol.83 p.181

[3] Zion Chapel Sunday School Register held in the archives of the Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion Church at Hailsham, Sussex.

[4] Sackville College was built in the early 1600s as almshouses for 31 poor people of East Grinstead, with money left by Robert Sackville, Earl of Dorset. It was still used for that purpose in 1851.

[5] The Oxford Movement, or Puseyite Movement, whose members were known as Puseyites after one of the movements founders, Edward Bouverie Pusey (1800-1882), who was Regius professor of Hebrew and Canon of Christ Church in Oxford, and a champion of the orthodoxy of revealed religion.

[6] TNA ASSI 36/6 Assize Depositions for Home, Norfolk & South-Eastern Circuit.

[7] TNA HO 27/98 page 215 Criminal Registers, Sussex 1851.

[8] TNA ADM 157/58 f.191 Royal Marines, Chatham Division, Attestation papers of William Muddle.

[9] Zion Chapel Sunday School Register held in the archives of the Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion Church at Hailsham, Sussex.

[10] Zion Chapel Sunday School Register held in the archives of the Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion Church at Hailsham, Sussex.

[11] Zion Chapel Sunday School Register held in the archives of the Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion Church at Hailsham, Sussex.

[12] Zion Chapel Sunday School Register held in the archives of the Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion Church at Hailsham, Sussex.

[13] Zion Chapel Sunday School Register held in the archives of the Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion Church at Hailsham, Sussex.

 

Copyright © Derek Miller 2005-2013

Last updated 5 August 2013

 

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